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  • Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty

    Gunther Forg (1952-2013) was a German painter, sculptor, and photographer with an irreverent approach to abstraction. Forg's project tackled the latent instability between image and reality. His painterly surfaces may appear exquisitely sensitive, his installations elegantly precise, but these are mastered and executed with a cold detachment. His deft manipulations of the languages of abstraction obscured a darker message. This publication, the most comprehensive to date, offers an important new understanding of this extraordinary and complex artist. Three years in the making, it reinterprets Forg's oeuvre to reveal an artistic project that raises important questions about the traditional role of an object as a conveyor of fixed meaning. The book's subtitle--"A Fragile Beauty"--is an indication of how Forg successfully manipulated what is behind and beyond an object's appearance.

  • Gates of the Lord - The Tradition of Krishna Paintings

    The Pushtimarg, a Hindu sect established in India in the fifteenth century, possesses a unique culture--reaching back centuries and still vital today--in which art and devotion are deeply intertwined. This important volume, illustrated with more than one hundred vivid images, offers a new, in-depth look at the Pushtimarg and its rich aesthetic traditions, which are largely unknown outside of South Asia.

    Original essays by eminent scholars of Indian art focus on the style of worship, patterns of patronage, and artistic heritage that generated pichvais, large paintings on cloth designed to hang in temples, as well as other paintings for the Pushtimarg. In this expansive study, the authors deftly examine how pichvais were and still are used in the seasonal and daily veneration of Shrinathji, an aspect of Krishna as a child who is the chief deity of the temple town of Nathdwara in Rajasthan. Gates of the Lord introduces readers not only to the visual world of the Pushtimarg, but also to the spirit of Nathdwara.

  • Production and Operations Management: Tutor's Guide: Text and Cases

    Including all examples, answers and cases studies from the parent texts, this is an instruction manual for those involved in the lecturing, learning or practice of production and operations management. It is available free of charge to lecturers adopting either parent text.

  • The Lessons of Tragedy: Statecraft and World Order

    An eloquent call to draw on the lessons of the past to address current threats to international order

    The ancient Greeks hard-wired a tragic sensibility into their culture. By looking disaster squarely in the face, by understanding just how badly things could spiral out of control, they sought to create a communal sense of responsibility and courage--to spur citizens and their leaders to take the difficult actions necessary to avert such a fate. Today, after more than seventy years of great-power peace and a quarter-century of unrivaled global leadership, Americans have lost their sense of tragedy. They have forgotten that the descent into violence and war has been all too common throughout human history. This amnesia has become most pronounced just as Americans and the global order they created are coming under graver threat than at any time in decades.

    In a forceful argument that brims with historical sensibility and policy insights, two distinguished historians argue that a tragic sensibility is necessary if America and its allies are to address the dangers that menace the international order today. Tragedy may be commonplace, Brands and Edel argue, but it is not inevitable--so long as we regain an appreciation of the world's tragic nature before it is too late.

  • Fashion Underground - The World of Susanne Bartsch

    A lavishly illustrated tribute to one of the most remarkable self-invented personalities on the New York fashion scene

    Susanne Bartsch has been the queen of New York City nightlife since the 1980s when she first became famous for spectacular parties, where a diverse crowd brought fashion to the level of performance art. Her most important party was undoubtedly the 1989 Love Ball, a pioneering AIDS benefit that brought the fashion world together. The Love Ball was followed by other parties, which ultimately raised more than $2.5 million for AIDS research and advocacy. Over the years, Bartsch has had a profound impact on the world of fashion and visual culture. She has been a retailer, a fashion show organizer, a muse, and a catalyst. As Holly Brubach wrote in her 1991 New Yorker profile, "If there is a theme that runs through the various jobs Bartsch has held, it is perhaps a fascination with the way people present themselves--with the clothes and the part they play in people's imagination."

    Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch features approximately 80 looks from Bartsch's personal collection of clothing and accessories, including designs by Rachel Auburn, Body Map, Leigh Bowery, John Galliano, Jean Paul Gaultier, Thierry Mugler, Mr. Pearl, Vivienne Westwood, Zaldy, and many others. Dazzling color photographs allow readers to witness the incredible art of transformation.

  • The Neapolitan Crèche at the Art Institute of Chicago

    The 18th-century Neapolitan creche at the Art Institute of Chicago, which contains over 200 figures arranged in a panorama of street life, represents the pinnacle of a rich artistic heritage. This luxurious catalogue is the first to study the creche in the context of art and music history. Essays explore the Neapolitan creche tradition and examine the design of Chicago's example with reference to other important creches in Europe and the United States. Entries on individual figures identify the characters and types they represent, as well as their social and historical meaning and religious significance. Other entries address groups of figures, animals, and cultural themes present in the creche. Together the essays and entries highlight the astonishing realism and potent symbolism of these figures, which range from heavenly angels and the Holy Family around the manger to street vendors and revelers feasting, drinking, and dancing in a tavern.

  • Mechanisms of Inorganic and Organometallic Reactions

    The current volume covers electron transfer reactions, substitution and relation reactions, and reactions of organometallic compounds.

  • Condensed Matter Research Using Neutrons: Today and Tomorrow

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Condensed Matter Re- search Using Neutrons, Today and Tomorrow was held in Abingdon, Oxfordshire for four days beginning 26 March 1984. The Workshop was sponsored by NATO and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. A total of 32 lecturers and participants attended. An objective of the Workshop was to review some dynamic proper- ties of condensed matter that can be studied using neutron spectros- copy. A second objective, no less important, was to identify new topics that might be investigated with advanced spallation neutron sources. The twelve lectures reproduced in this volume bear wit- ness, largely by themselves, to the success of the Workshop in meet- ing these objectives. The many discussions generated by lecturers and participants meant that, in the event, the objectives were in- deed amply satisfied. I should like to thank all those who attended the Horkshop for their part in making it so beneficial and rewarding. I am most grateful to Reinhard Scherm, who acted as my advisor in the organisation of the Workshop. The efforts of Mrs. M. Sherwen and Miss J. Harren made light my burden of administrative duties. The preparation of the manuscript for publication was simplified by the assistance of Miss C. Monypenny.

  • Court, Country, City: British Art and Architecture, 1660-1735

    "The late 17th and early 18th centuries saw profound changes in Britain and in its visual arts. This volume provides fresh perspectives on the art of the late Stuart and early Georgian periods, focusing on the concepts, spaces, and audiences of court, country, and city as reflected in an array of objects, materials, and places. The essays discuss the revolutionary political and economic circumstances of the period, which not only forged a new nation-state but also provided a structural setting for artistic production and reception. Essays cover such diverse topics as tapestry in the age of Charles II and painting in the court of Queen Anne; male friendship portraits; mezzotint and the exchange between painting and print; the interpretation of genres such as still life and marine painting; the concept of remembered places; courtly fashion and furnishing; the codification of rules for painting; and the development of aesthetic theory"--

  • Physical Properties of Amorphous Materials

    The Institute for Amorphous Studies was founded in 1982 as the international center for the investigation of amorphous mate- rials. It has since played an important role in promoting the und er- standing of disordered matter in general. An Institute lecture series on "Fundamentals of Amorphous Materials and Devices" was held during 1982-83 with distinguished speakers from universities and industry. These events were free and open to the public, and were attended by many representatives of the scientific community. The lectures themselves were highly successful inasmuch as they provided not only formal instruction but also an opportunity for vigorous and stimulating debate. That last element could not be captured within the pages of a book I but the lectures concentrated on the latest advances in the field I which is why their essential contents are he re reproduced in collective form. Together they constitute an interdisciplinary status report of the field. The speakers brought many different viewpoints and a variety of back- ground experiences io bear on the problems involved I but though language and conventions vary I the essential unity of the concerns is very clear I as indeed are the ultimate benefits of the many-sided approach.

  • Dangerous Years: Climate Change, the Long Emergency, and the Way Forward

    A leading environmental thinker takes a hard look at the obstacles and possibilities on the long road to sustainability

    This gripping, deeply thoughtful book considers future of civilization in the light of what we know about climate change and related threats. David Orr, an award-winning, internationally recognized leader in the field of sustainability and environmental education, pulls no punches: even with the Paris Agreement of 2015, Earth systems will not reach a new equilibrium for centuries. Earth is becoming a different planet--more threadbare and less biologically diverse, with more acidic oceans and a hotter, more capricious climate. Furthermore, technology will not solve complex problems of sustainability.

    Yet we are not fated to destroy the Earth, Orr insists. He imagines sustainability as a quest and a transition built upon robust and durable democratic and economic institutions, as well as changes in heart and mindset. The transition, he writes, is beginning from the bottom up in communities and neighborhoods. He lays out specific principles and priorities to guide us toward enduring harmony between human and natural systems.

  • Understanding The Contested Auction

    Aimed at all players keen to improve their bidding skills
    A brilliant and original contribution to bridge writing from two outstandingly successful writers, players and teachers

  • Inventing American Exceptionalism: The Origins of American Adversarial Legal Culture, 1800-1877

    A highly engaging account of the developments--not only legal, but also socioeconomic, political, and cultural--that gave rise to Americans' distinctively lawyer-driven legal culture

    When Americans imagine their legal system, it is the adversarial trial--dominated by dueling larger-than-life lawyers undertaking grand public performances--that first comes to mind. But as award-winning author Amalia Kessler reveals in this engrossing history, it was only in the turbulent decades before the Civil War that adversarialism became a defining American practice and ideology, displacing alternative, more judge-driven approaches to procedure. By drawing on a broad range of methods and sources--and by recovering neglected influences (including from Europe)--the author shows how the emergence of the American adversarial legal culture was a product not only of developments internal to law, but also of wider socioeconomic, political, and cultural debates over whether and how to undertake market regulation and pursue racial equality. As a result, adversarialism came to play a key role in defining American legal institutions and practices, as well as national identity.

  • John Baldessari Catalogue Raisonné - Volume Three: 1987 1993

    A comprehensive look at works made by Baldessari between the years 1987 and 1993

    This handsome volume, the third of the John Baldessari (b. 1931) catalogue raisonne project, compiles 400-plus unique works of art made by the influential conceptual artist from 1987 through 1993. Here we see the artist's large-scale photo-based works, many of which employed his signature colored discs painted over the faces of people in the photos, accompanied by entries that trace the shifts and developments in Baldessari's work as his collaged photo narratives achieved maturity and mastery.

    A critical essay by Briony Fer provides a close reading of selected works, giving historical context for Baldessari's art from this period. In addition to a detailed chronology, complete exhibition history, and bibliography, this volume notably features a previously unpublished conversation between Baldessari and the artist Ed Ruscha, which was undertaken specifically for this publication. In the conversation, the artists discuss their early careers in Southern California and the shared thematic concerns in their work.

    The artworks in this volume demonstrate Baldessari's ability to express--and, in many cases, combine--the narrative potential of images and the associative power of language within the boundaries of a single piece.

  • Japanomania in the Nordic Countries, 1875-1918

    This extensive publication, complete with hundreds of illustrations by such renowned artists as Carl Larsson, Edvard Munch, Vilhelm Hammershoi, Helene Schjerfbeck, Pekka Halonen, Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Gerhard Munthe, Pietro Krohn, and Frida Hansen, among others, offers an unprecedented study of Japanese influence on the visual arts in the Nordic countries. This unlikely diffusion of Japanese culture, known collectively as Japonisme, became increasingly apparent in England, France, and elsewhere in Europe during the 19th century, although nowhere was the influence seemingly as pervasive as it was throughout the Nordic countries. The book reveals how the widespread interest in Japanese aesthetics helped to establish notions of a fundamental unity between the arts and transformed the region's visual vocabulary. The adoption of Japanese motifs and styles in Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark gave a necessary cohesion to their existing artistic language, creating a vital balance within and among all of the decorative arts.

  • Against Dharma: Dissent in the Ancient Indian Sciences of Sex and Politics

    An esteemed scholar of Hinduism presents a groundbreaking interpretation of ancient Indian texts and their historic influence on subversive resistance

    Ancient Hindu texts speak of the three aims of human life: dharma, artha, and kama. Translated, these might be called religion, politics, and pleasure, and each is held to be an essential requirement of a full life. Balance among the three is a goal not always met, however, and dharma has historically taken precedence over the other two qualities in Hindu life. Here, historian of religions Wendy Doniger offers a spirited and close reading of ancient Indian writings, unpacking a long but unrecognized history of opposition against dharma.

    Doniger argues that scientific disciplines (shastras) have offered lively and continuous criticism of dharma, or religion, over many centuries. She chronicles the tradition of veiled subversion, uncovers connections to key moments of resistance and voices of dissent throughout Indian history, and offers insights into the Indian theocracy's subversion of science by religion today.

  • Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect

    An insightful and essential new survey of Wyeth's entire career, situating the milestones of his art within the trajectory of 20th-century American life

    This major retrospective catalogue explores the impact of time and place on the work of beloved American painter Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009). While previous publications have mainly analyzed Wyeth's work thematically, this publication places him fully in the context of the long 20th century, tracing his creative development from World War I through the new millennium.

    Published to coincide with the centenary of Wyeth's birth, the book looks at four major chronological periods in the artist's career: Wyeth as a product of the interwar years, when he started to form his own "war memories" through military props and documentary photography he discovered in his father's art studio; the change from his "theatrical" pictures of the 1940s to his own visceral responses to the landscape around Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, and his family's home in Maine; his sudden turn, in 1968, into the realm of erotic art, including a completely new assessment of Wyeth's "Helga pictures"--a series of secret, nude depictions of his neighbor Helga Testorf--within his career as a whole; and his late, self-reflective works, which includes the discussion of his previously unknown painting entitled Goodbye, now believed to be Wyeth's last work.

  • Such Fine Boys

    Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano's spellbinding tale of adolescent schoolmates and the vicissitudes of fate

    As a boarding school student in the early 1960s, Patrick Modiano lived among the troubled teenage sons of wealthy but self-involved parents. In this mesmerizing novel, Modiano weaves together a series of exquisitely crafted stories about such jettisoned boys at the exclusive Valvert School on the outskirts of Paris: abandoned children of privilege, left to create new family ties among themselves. Misfits and heroes, sports champions and good-hearted chums, the boys of Valvert misbehave, run away, get expelled, and engage in various forms of delinquency and disappearance. They emerge into adulthood tragically damaged, still tethered to their adolescent selves, powerless to escape the central loneliness of their lives in an ever-darkening spiral of self-delusion and grim consequence.

    A meditation on nostalgia, the pitfalls of privilege, and the vicissitudes of fate, this book fully demonstrates the powerful mix of sadness, mystery, wonder, and ominous danger that characterizes Modiano's most rewarding fiction.

    • Special feature: J. M. G. Le Clezio's foreword, here in English for the first time, provides a rare and insightful appreciation of one Nobel laureate by another.

  • French Management: Elitism in Action

    This fascinating book is an account of management in the contemporary French business world, looking at the corporate culture of Michelin, L'Air Liquide, L'Oreal, and Carrefour.

  • Tales By Japanese Soldiers

    An absolutely unique book, this is the Second World War in Burma as seen through the eyes of ordinary Japanese soldiers

    Over 305,000 Japanese soldiers fought in Burma between 1942 and 1945; 180,000 of them died. This book, uniquely, tells how the common soldier of the Imperial Japanese Army lived, fought and died in that terrible conflict. Here are straightforward accounts, sometimes moving, often shocking, of what it was like to fight a war in a strange country, far from home, short of food and weapons, confused, facing death from disease and starvation as well as enemy action.

    Sixty-two 'tales', translated from the Japanese, trace the Burma campaign in chronological sequence and together offer a new perspective on a terrible war. Japanese soldiers, navy men, fighter pilots, and others were from a different culture, but they were not the devils of popular legend. Just like their enemies, they were scared young men, fighting to the death a war they didn't understand.

  • Instabilities and Chaos in Quantum Optics, II

    This volume contains tutorial papers from the lectures and seminars presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Instabilities and Chaos in Quantum Optics", held at the "Il Ciocco" Conference Center, Castelvecchio Pascoli, Lucca, Italy, June 28-July 7, 1987. The title of the volume is designated Instabilities and Chaos in Quantum Optics II, because of the nearly coincident publication of a collection of articles on research in this field edited by F.T. Arecchi and R.G. Harrison [Instabilities and Chaos in Quantum Optics, (Springer, Berlin, 1987) 1. That volume provides more detailed information about some of these topics. Together they will serve as a comprehensive and tutorial pair of companion volumes. This school was directed by Prof. Massimo Inguscio, of the Department of Physics, University of Naples, Naples, Italy to whom we express our gratitude on behalf of all lecturers and students. The Scientific Advisory Committee consisted of N.B. Abraham of Bryn Mawr College; F.T. Arecchi of the National Institute of Optics in Florence and the University of Florence, and L.A. Lugiato of the Politechnic Institute of Torino. The school continues the long tradition of Europhysics Summer Schools in Quantum Electronics which have provided instruction and training for young researchers and advanced students working in this field for almost twenty years.

  • Modern Bioelectrochemistry

    As stated by Buckminster Fuller in Operation Manual for Spaceship Earth, "Synergy is the behavior of whole systems unpredicted by separately observed behaviors of any of the system's separate parts". In a similar vein, one might define an intellectual synergy as "an improvement in our understanding of the behavior of a system unpredicted by separately acquired viewpoints of the activities of such a system". Such considerations underlie, and provide a motivation for, an interdisciplinary approach to the problem of unraveling the deeper mysteries of cellular metabolism and organization, and have led a number of pioneering spirits, many represen- ted in the pages which follow, to consider biological systems from an elec- trochemical standpoint. is itself, of course, an interdisciplinary branch of Now electrochemistry science, and there is no doubt that many were introduced to it via Bockris and Reddy's outstanding, wide-ranging and celebrated textbook Modern Electrochemistry. If I am to stick my neck out, and seek to define bioelec- trochemistry, I would take it to refer to "the study of the mutual interac- tions of electrical fields and biological materials, including living systems".

  • Grounds for Dreaming: Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the California Farmworker Movement

    Known as "The Salad Bowl of the World," California's Salinas Valley became an agricultural empire due to the toil of diverse farmworkers, including Latinos. A sweeping critical history of how Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants organized for their rights in the decades leading up to the seminal strikes led by Cesar Chavez, this important work also looks closely at how different groups of Mexicans--U.S. born, bracero, and undocumented--confronted and interacted with one another during this period.

    An incisive study of labor, migration, race, gender, citizenship, and class, Lori Flores's first book offers crucial insights for today's ever-growing U.S. Latino demographic, the farmworker rights movement, and future immigration policy.

  • The Mathematics Lover's Companion: Masterpieces for Everyone

    Twenty-three mathematical masterpieces for exploration and enlightenment

    How can a shape have more than one dimension but fewer than two? What is the best way to elect public officials when more than two candidates are vying for the office? Is it possible for a highly accurate medical test to give mostly incorrect results? Can you tile your floor with regular pentagons? How can you use only the first digit of sales numbers to determine if your accountant is lying? Can mathematics give insights into free will?

    Edward Scheinerman, an accomplished mathematician and enthusiastic educator, answers all these questions and more in this book, a collection of mathematical masterworks. In bite-sized chapters that require only high school algebra, he invites readers to try their hands at solving mathematical puzzles and provides an engaging and friendly tour of numbers, shapes, and uncertainty. The result is an unforgettable introduction to the fundamentals and pleasures of thinking mathematically.

  • Laser Applications in Medicine and Biology

    The use oflasers has entered almost every facet of medicine and biology. Therefore, it is to be expected that the reviews contained in this vol- urne will reflect this diversity. As dinical acceptance has grown with various diagnostic and therapeutic applications, so has the need for a more thorough understanding of the theoretical background for each. This is especially true where a correlation is to be made between the theoretical background and the experimental data. It is only in this way that we can attain the optimal form of any therapy. The basic coupling ofenergy into biological tissue and its conversion into heat is characterized by many parameters. One ofthe most important is pulse duration. The review by Bimgruber in Chapter 6 shows how our knowledge ofthis parameter has been extended.The need for a more basic understanding of the interaction of electromagnetic energy with various kinds of materials has led to investigations on the nature of plasmas- their stability and instability, and how theyexist. Docchio reviews the factors that cause them to occur at a specific locale and then to move away from that site. The availabilityofmany types ofoptical fibers has extended our ability to deliver laser energy from various types oflasers into almost anyselected location. This is particularly useful in medicine, where less invasive ap- proaches to surgery and diagnosis are always helpful. However, as Rol and his colleagues explain, the power-handling capabilities ofoptical fibers limit many applications, particularly for short-duration, high-peak-power laser pulses.

  • Out of the Shadow of a Giant: Hooke, Halley, and the Birth of Science

    What if Newton had never lived? A compelling dual biography argues that Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley easily could have filled the giant's shoes--and deserve credit for the birth of modern science.

    Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose place in history has been overshadowed by the giant figure of Newton, were pioneering scientists within their own right, and instrumental in establishing the Royal Society.

    Although Newton is widely regarded as one of the greatest scientists of all time and the father of the English scientific revolution, John and Mary Gribbin uncover the fascinating story of Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley, whose scientific achievements neatly embrace the hundred years or so during which science as we know it became established. They argue persuasively that, even without Newton, science would have made a great leap forward in the second half of the seventeenth century, headed by two extraordinary figures, Hooke and Halley.

  • Hydrogen in Disordered and Amorphous Solids

    This is the second volume in the NATO ASI series dealing with the topic of hydrogen in solids. The first (V. B76, Metal Hydrides) appeared five years ago and focussed primarily on crystalline phases of hydrided metallic systems. In the intervening period, the amorphous solid state has become an area of intense research activity, encompassing both metallic and non-metallic, e.g. semiconducting, systems. At the same time the problem of storage of hydrogen, which motivated the first ASI, continues to be important. In the case of metallic systems, there were early indications that metallic glasses and disordered alloys may be more corrosion resistant, less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and have a higher hydrogen mobility than ordered metals or intermetallics. All of these properties are desirable for hydrogen storage. Subsequent research has shown that thermodynamic instability is a severe problem in many amorphous metal hydrides. The present ASI has provided an appropriate forum to focus on these issues.

  • Coherence in Atomic Collision Physics

    During the last two decades the experimental investigation of atomic coherence phenomena has made rapid progress. Detailed studies have been performed of angular correlations, spin polarization effects, angular momen- tum transfer, and the alignment parameters which characterize the charge cloud of excited atoms. The enormous growth in the number of these investigations was made possible through substantial development and application of new experimental technology, the development of sophisti- cated theoretical models and numerical methods, and a fine interplay between theory and experiment. This interplay has resulted in a deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms of atomic collision processes. It is the purpose of the chapters in this book to provide introductions for nonspecialists to the various fields of this area as well as to present new experimental and theoretical results and ideas. The interest in spin-dependent interactions in electron-atom scattering has a long history; it dates back to the early investigations of Mott in 1929. While the more traditional measurements in this field were concerned with the determination of spin polarization and asymmetries, the range of investi- gations has been expanded enormously during the last few years and now includes many observables sensitive to one or more of the various spin- dependent interactions. The understanding of these effects requires a theoretical description of the orientation and alignment parameters of the target atoms, of the forma- tion of resonances, of the influence of electron-exchange processes, and of the relativistic interactions inside the atom and between projectile and target.

  • Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World

    In this landmark international history, stretching from the Oscar Wilde scandal to the gay liberation movement, Gregory Woods explores how informal gay and lesbian networks effected seismic changes in twentieth-century culture.

  • Introduction to X-Ray Spectrometric Analysis

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been an established, widely practiced method of instrumental chemical analysis for about 30 years. However, although many colleges and universities offer full-semester courses in optical spectrometric methods of instrumental analysis and in x-ray dif- fraction, very few offer full courses in x-ray spectrometric analysis. Those courses that are given are at the graduate level. Consequently, proficiency in this method must still be acquired by: self-instruction; on-the-job training and experience; "workshops" held by the x-ray instrument manu- facturers; the one- or two-week summer courses offered by a few uni- versities; and certain university courses in analytical and clinical chemistry, metallurgy, mineralogy. geology, ceramics. etc. that devote a small portion of their time to applications of x-ray spectrometry to those respective disciplines. Moreover, with all due respect to the books on x-ray spectrometric analysis now in print, in my opinion none is really suitable as a text or manual for beginners in the discipline. In 1968, when I undertook the writing of the first edition of my previous book, Principles and Practice of X-Ray Spectrometric Analysis, * my objective was to provide a student text. However, when all the material was compiled, I decided to provide a more comprehensive book, which was also lacking at that time. Although that book explains principles, instrumentation, and methods at the begin- ner's level, this material is distributed throughout a mass of detail and more advanced material.

  • A Meeting of Land and Sea: Nature and the Future of Martha's Vineyard

    An eminent ecologist shows how an iconic New England island has been shaped by nature and human history, and how its beloved landscape can be protected

    Full of surprises, bedecked with gorgeous photographs and maps, and supported by unprecedented historical and ecological research, this book awakens a new perspective on the renowned New England island Martha's Vineyard. David Foster explores the powerful natural and cultural forces that have shaped the storied island to arrive at a new interpretation of the land today and a well-informed guide to its conservation in the future.

    Two decades of research by Foster and his colleagues at the Harvard Forest encompass the native people and prehistory of the Vineyard, climate change and coastal dynamics, colonial farming and modern tourism, as well as land planning and conservation efforts. Each of these has helped shape the island of today, and each also illuminates possibilities for future caretakers of the island's ecology. Foster affirms that Martha's Vineyard is far more than just a haven for celebrities, presidents, and moguls; it is a special place with a remarkable history and a population with a proud legacy of caring for the land and its future.

  • Inverse Problems in Differential Equations

    Elucidates the fundamental mathematical structures of inverse problems, analyzing both the information content and the solution of some inverse problems in which the information content of the coefficients and the source term of a given differential equation is not too large. In order to be accessib

  • Advances in X-Ray Analysis

    The continuing success of the Denver X-Ray Conference is, it seems to me, the consequence of three equally important facets of each meeting. These are: 1) the collegial atmosphere and workshops at which experts and novices mix, talk, and informally share information at many levels; 2) the plenary session at which information is presented that intentionally brings new ideas to attendees to broaden the scope of the field; and 3) the traditional sessions in which interesting reports on current research and applications are presented in a timely and professional way. The first and last of these are discussed separately by Paul Predecki and are organized (no small task!) by the entire advisory board. This requires much more than deciding whether yet another workshop on specimen preparation is needed and whom to prevail upon to organize and present it. In fact, few attendees at these workshops ever appreciate the level of effort that Paul and his staff expend to make sure everything comes off smoothly, even when hundreds of copies of handouts need to be whipped off at the last moment, travel problems arise, or unusual audio- visual aids are suddenly needed. But my topic here is the second of the three facets listed above - the plenary session. Organizing this falls to a single individual, on the theory that one person can then approach enough others as speakers to put together a unified and yet diverse program of related and interesting review papers.

  • Surface and Colloid Science

    Ever since the first volume appeared in 1969, this series has received good reviews in a variety of periodicals published in different corners of the world. It would seem that the work has fulfilled its purpose as outlined in the Preface to Volume 1. The rapidly increasing interest in surface and colloid science by people engaged in industrial research and development, and in environmental, ecological, medical, pharmaceutical, and other areas, justifies the continuation of such an effort. The Surface and Colloid Science series originated with John Wiley and Sons and has been continued with Plenum Press. This volume is the third with the present publisher, and is the best assurance of our mutual interest to proceed with this work. Some books in the series, as was the case with Volume 11, may appear under the editorship of other workers in the field. For reasons of continuity, a sequential numbering system will be maintained. This editor hopes to provide the scientific and technical community with high-quality contributions in surface and colloid science in the future. He invites specialists to submit definitive chapters on any topic within the broad area of our discipline for inclusion in this series.

  • Kentucky Renaissance: The Lexington Camera Club and Its Community, 1954-1974

    A groundbreaking study of the extraordinary photographers, writers, printmakers, and publishers who formed a flourishing modernist community in Kentucky

    Dozens of American cities witnessed the founding of camera clubs in the first half of the 20th century, though few boasted as many accomplished artists as the one based in Lexington, Kentucky. This pioneering book provides the most absorbing account to date of the Lexington Camera Club, an under-studied group of artists whose ranks included Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Van Deren Coke, Robert C. May, James Baker Hall, and Cranston Ritchie. These and other members of the Lexington Camera Club explored the craft and expressive potential of photography. They captured Kentucky's dramatic natural landscape and experimented widely with different techniques, including creating double and multiple exposures or shooting deliberately out-of-focus images.

    In addition to compiling images by these photographers, this book examines their relationships with writers, publishers, and printmakers based in Kentucky at the time, such as Wendell Berry, Guy Davenport, Jonathan Greene, and Thomas Merton. Moreover, the publication seeks to highlight the unique contributions that the Lexington Camera Club made to 20th-century photography, thus broadening a narrative of modern art that has long focused on New York and Chicago. Featuring a wealth of new scholarship, this fascinating catalogue asserts the importance and artistic achievement of these often overlooked photographers and their circle.

  • Pharaoh: King of Ancient Egypt

    A fresh look at the British Museum's celebrated and extensive ancient Egyptian collection from across three thousand years

    Pharaoh: King of Ancient Egypt introduces readers to three thousand years of Egypt's ancient history by unveiling its famous rulers--the pharaohs--using some of the finest objects from the vast holdings of the British Museum, along with masterworks from the collection fo the Cleveland Museum of Art.. In an introductory essay, Margaret Maitland looks at Egyptian kingship in terms of both ideology and practicality. Then Aude Semat considers the Egyptian image of kingship, its roles and its uses. In ten additional sections, Marie Vandenbeusch delves into themes related to the land of ancient Egypt, conceptions of kingship, the exercise of power, royal daily life, war and diplomacy, and death and afterlife. Detailed entries by Vandenbeusch and Semat cover key works relating to the pharaohs. These objects, beautifully illustrated in 180 photographs, include monumental sculpture, architectural pieces, funerary objects, exquisite jewelry, and papyri.

    The rulers of ancient Egypt were not always male, or even always Egyptian. At times, Egypt was divided by civil war, conquered by foreign powers, or ruled by competing kings. Many of the objects surviving from ancient Egypt represent the image a pharaoh wanted to project, but this publication also looks past the myth to explore the realities and immense challenges of ruling one of the greatest civilizations the world has seen.

  • Public Lies and Private Truths: An Anatomy of Public Relations

    This study exposes the workings of the PR industry, highlighting the key players, and showing how to succeed by making contacts and developing networks. The book covers the skills for success, such as the ability to sort and assimilate facts quickly, to write and speak cogently, and to understand the motivation of competitors. A comparison is made of the perceptions and realities of public relations in Britain, North America and continental Europe, along with the implications for a unified Europe.

  • The Knowledge Game: The Revolution in Learning and Communication in the Workplace

    This is a record of the process of active learning as a small company discovers the potential of electronic communication for their publishing programme. It then provides an account of early practice in relationship marketing and action learning as developed in International Management Centres (IMC). The text explains how electronic publishing can transform the educational process, and explores how electronic customer databases have changed marketing and promotion practices. It maintains that electronic media will result in a new breed of more confident, more democratic and responsible workers, who make decisions, pursue needed information, network worldwide and will become a marketing intelligentsia.

  • Bridge Over Troubled Waters

    David Bird is acknowledged as the world's best when it comes to humorous bridge fiction. As the bridge cruise traverses the Far East, the bridge organiser, Richard Knight, visits Pat Pong - the notorious red-light district of Bangkok - and is enticed by three attractive Thai girls into a bridge game. Other hilarious adventures take place in a drug den in Hong Kong, in backpacker land in Bali, in a Shinto monastery in Kyoto, and in the Double Bay Club in Sydney.

    A mixture of top-class bridge, exhilarating narrative and a host of true-to-life characters.

  • Presbyopia Research: From Molecular Biology to Visual Adaptation

    Seeing is life. Seeing is transfonning luminous col- We wish to extend our academic and theoretical ored stimulations and shapes into amental represen- knowledge and also to complete and exchange our tation, structured in space and in time. But seeing is technical and professional experience to prepare also opening onto the world that surrounds us: it is corrective means for the future. thus a means for communicating and learning. Numerous questions have yet to be answered, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, a philosopher worth such as: quoting during the bicentennial of the French Revo- lution of which he was an instigator, stated, "of all - Will it one day be possible to defer or stop the the senses, vision is that wh ich can be the least aging of the accommodative apparatus? readily separated from judgments of the mind. " - Is further improvement of the current corrective Sight is increasingly called on in our modern means possible, whether spectacles or contact world. Maturity is affected at about 40-45 years by lenses? the on set of presbyopia. Atthat age, which demands - How are behavioral and psychological presbyope all our intellectual and physical means, our sight typologies to be integrated in the course of exam- should be irreproachable. Our efficiency must not be ination, prescription, and fitting with corrective diminished.

  • Nature by Design: The Practice of Biophilic Design

    Biophilia is the theory that people possess an inherent affinity for nature, which developed during the long course of human evolution. In recent years, studies have revealed that this inclination continues to be a vital component to human health and wellbeing. Given the pace and scale of construction today with its adversarial, dominative relationship with nature, the integration of nature with the built environment is one of the greatest challenges of our time.

    In this sweeping examination, Stephen Kellert describes the basic principles, practices, and options for successfully implementing biophilic design. He shows us what is--and isn't--good biophilic design using examples of workplaces, healthcare facilities, schools, commercial centers, religious structures, and hospitality settings. This book will to appeal to architects, designers, engineers, scholars of human evolutionary biology, and--with more than one hundred striking images of designs--anyone interested in nature-inspired spaces.

  • The Vampire: A New History

    An authoritative new history of the vampire, two hundred years after it first appeared on the literary scene Published to mark the bicentenary of John Polidori's publication of The Vampyre, Nick Groom's detailed new account illuminates the complex history of the iconic creature. The vampire first came to public prominence in the early eighteenth century, when Enlightenment science collided with Eastern European folklore and apparently verified outbreaks of vampirism, capturing the attention of medical researchers, political commentators, social theorists, theologians, and philosophers. Groom accordingly traces the vampire from its role as a monster embodying humankind's fears, to that of an unlikely hero for the marginalised and excluded in the twenty-first century. Drawing on literary and artistic representations, as well as medical, forensic, empirical, and sociopolitical perspectives, this rich and eerie history presents the vampire as a strikingly complex being that has been used to express the traumas and contradictions of the human condition.

  • Dynamics of Forest Insect Populations: Patterns, Causes, Implications

    Insects multiply. Destruction reigns. There is dismay, followed by outcry, and demands to Authority. Authority remembers its experts or appoints some: they ought to know. The experts advise a Cure. The Cure can be almost anything: holy water from Mecca, a Government Commis- sion, a culture of bacteria, poison, prayers denunciatory or tactful, a new god, a trap, a Pied Piper. The Cures have only one thing in common: with a little patience they always work. They have never been known entirely to fail. Likewise they have never been known to prevent the next outbreak. For the cycle of abundance and scarcity has a rhythm of its own, and the Cures are applied just when the plague of insects is going to abate through its own loss of momentum. -Abridged, with insects in place of voles, from C. Elton, 1924, Voles, Mice and Lemmings, with permission of Oxford University Press This book is an enquiry into the "natural rhythms" of insect abundance in forested ecosystems and into the forces that give rise to these rhythms. Forests form unique environ- ments for such studies because one can find them growing under relatively natural (pri- meval) conditions as well as under the domination of human actions. Also, the slow growth and turnover rates of forested ecosystems enable us to investigate insect popula- tion dynamics in a plant environment that remains relatively constant or changes only slowly, this in contrast to agricultural systems, where change is often drastic and frequent.

  • Art and Nature in the Middle Ages

    This splendidly illustrated book explores the universal and multifaceted theme of nature as manifested in Western European art of the Middle Ages. Fascinating essays consider the concept in the context of medieval philosophy, theology, and poetry. The masterpieces highlighted here, from the distinguished collection of the Musee de Cluny, span the 12th through the 16th centuries and include an impressive array of objects destined for both religious and secular purposes---from exquisite stained glass and carved capitals to spectacular enameled jewelry, illuminated manuscripts, and woven tapestries. Art and Nature in the Middle Ages provides an essential understanding of the symbolism and significance of motifs taken from the natural world, as well as the technical mastery of the medieval artisans who produced these remarkable objects.

  • Finitely Axiomatizable Theories

    This is the only monograph devoted to the expressibility of finitely axiomatizable theories, a classical subject in mathematical logic. The volume summarizes investigations in the field that have led to much of the current progress, treating systematically all positive results concerning expressibility. Also included in this unique text are solutions to both the Vaught-Morely problem and the Hanf problem, and a number of new natural questions that provide prospects for further development of the theory.

  • David Wiesner & the Art of Wordless Storytelling

    The first publication to show the creative process of David Wiesner, one of the world's most acclaimed children's book illustrators

    A master of storytelling through pictures and three-time winner of the Caldecott Medal, David Wiesner (b. 1956) is one of the most highly acclaimed book illustrators in the world. This handsome volume is the first to examine his creative process and his many sources of inspiration. The book features dozens of lavish color plates, from early work to the exquisitely wrought watercolors that are the basis of his best-known books, along with pages excerpted from his forthcoming first graphic novel, Fish Girl. Also included are works by some of the artists most influential to Wiesner, including Marvel comic book legends, Surrealist and avant-garde masters, and mid-20th-century graphic artists. While illustration has often been marginalized in the world of fine art, the vibrant interplay among paintings, prints, comic books, graphic novels, iconic 20th-century films, and cartoons in Wiesner's art gives evidence to the complexity of the American tradition of picture book illustration.

  • Photon Migration in Tissues

    This book is formulated from a number of presentations made at a one-day workshop on the subject of Photon Migration in Tissues. The meeting was held in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania, April, 1988. The workshop was an impromptu effort to bring together scientists to discuss photon migration in animal tissues and appropriate models. The rapid emergence of the ideas of Townes and Schalow in their invention of the then called maser, now laser opened up completely unexpected possibilities for biomedical research. Timing of rapid biochemical reaction, identification of unstable intermediates, spectroscopy of short lived fluorescent states were all goals to be expected and achieved. At the same time continuous light spectroscopy of tissue slices and of the myocardium, and eventually of the brain have the to the the neonate emerged over years. Shifting red end of spectrum, Butler and Norris clearly showed how transparent plant materials and the human hand could be illuminated in this region and Jobsis applied their idea to the neonate brain using a multiwavelength technique.

  • Steven Spielberg: A Life in Films

    A film-centric portrait of the extraordinarily gifted movie director whose decades-long influence on American popular culture is unprecedented

    "Everything about me is in my films," Steven Spielberg has said. Taking this as a key to understanding the hugely successful moviemaker, Molly Haskell explores the full range of Spielberg's works for the light they shine upon the man himself. Through such powerhouse hits as Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., Jurassic Park, and Indiana Jones, to lesser-known masterworks like A.I. and Empire of the Sun, to the haunting Schindler's List, Haskell shows how Spielberg's uniquely evocative filmmaking and story-telling reveal the many ways in which his life, work, and times are entwined.

    Organizing chapters around specific films, the distinguished critic discusses how Spielberg's childhood in non-Jewish suburbs, his parents' traumatic divorce, his return to Judaism upon his son's birth, and other events echo in his work. She offers a brilliant portrait of the extraordinary director--a fearful boy living through his imagination who grew into a man whose openness, generosity of spirit, and creativity have enchanted audiences for more than 40 years.

  • Physics and Applications of Pseudosparks

    These proceedings examine the physics for high current emission and conduction observed in hollow cathode-hollow anode switches including the pseudospark and BLT, particularly centered around the triggering and conduction phase. New applications include highly emissive cathodes for microwave devices

  • The Royal Academy of Arts: History and Collections

    Published in association with the Royal Academy of Arts, London

    Animated by an unprecedented study of its collections, this book tells the story of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, and illuminates the history of art in Britain over the past two and a half centuries. Thousands of paintings, sculptures, drawings, and engravings, as well as silver, furniture, medals, and historic photographs, make up this monumental collection, featured here in stunning illustrations, and including an array of little-studied works of art and other objects of the highest quality. The works of art complement an archive of 600,000 documents and the first library in Britain dedicated to the fine arts. This fresh history reveals the central role of the Royal Academy in British national life, especially during the 19th century. It also explores periods of turmoil in the 20th century, when the Academy sought either to defy or to come to terms with modernism, challenging linear histories and frequently held notions of progress and innovation.

  • Improve Your Bridge Memory

    This is a brilliant and original book. Three sections cover beginner, intermediate and advanced players. The tastiest morsels are to be found in the intermediate section where the author discusses how to remember vital principles in bidding and play.

  • The Chessboard and the Web: Strategies of Connection in a Networked World

    From a renowned foreign-policy expert, a new paradigm for strategy in the twenty-first century

    In 1961, Thomas Schelling's The Strategy of Conflict used game theory to radically reenvision the U.S.-Soviet relationship and establish the basis of international relations for the rest of the Cold War. Now, Anne-Marie Slaughter--one of Foreign Policy's Top 100 Global Thinkers from 2009 to 2012, and the first woman to serve as director of the State Department Office of Policy Planning--applies network theory to develop a new set of strategies for the post-Cold War world. While chessboard-style competitive relationships still exist--U.S.-Iranian relations, for example--many other situations demand that we look not at individual entities but at their links to one another. We must learn to understand, shape, and build on those connections.

    Concise and accessible, based on real-world situations, on a lucid understanding of network science, and on a clear taxonomy of strategies, this will be a go-to resource for anyone looking for a new way to think about strategy in politics or business.

  • Human Lactation 3: The Effects of Milk on the Recipient Infant

    Four years ago the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) brought together a group of scientists to Belmont, Maryland to examine the status of human milk banking. During those deliberations, the idea was generated to organize a series of research conferences concerning human lactation and the composition and biological effects of human milk. The first one, organized by Robert G. Jensen from the University of Connecticut and Margaret C. Neville from the University of Colorado, dealt with methodologic issues. An additional meeting to explore the effects of maternal and environmental factors upon human lactation and the composition of human milk was organized by Margit Hamosh from Georgetown University and me, and was held in January, 1986 in Oaxaca, Mexico. Those meetings provided the foundation for the design of the present conference, 'The Effects of Human Milk Upon the Recipient Infant'. In addition to a grant from the NICHD, the conference was generously supported by Milupa AG from the Federal Republic of Germany; Wyeth Limited and Mead Johnson of Canada; and Ross Laboratories, Heinz USA, the Mead Johnson Nutritional Group, Wyeth International Limited, Gerber Products Company, the La Leche League International, Glaxo Incorporated and Sandoz Pharmaceutical Corporation from the United States.

  • Information Processing in Medical Imaging

    This book summarizes the proceedings of the 10th international conference on Infonnation Pro- cessing in Medical Imaging (IPMI-lO), held in June, 1987, in Zeist, The Netherlands. IPMI is a biennial conference, organized alternately in Europe and North America. The subject of the conference is the use of physics, mathematics, computer science, and engineering in the of medical images. The intent of the conference is to fonnation, processing and interpretation provide a forum where new ideas and results of research in medical imaging can be presented and amply discussed. Accordingly, the programme can comprise only a limited number of papers. The scientific committee of IPMI-lO selected 41 papers for presentation, although a total of 102 extended abstracts of on the average high quality had been submitted. All selected contri- butions are included in these proceedings. During of the preparations of the conference the organizers received the tragic news of the death of Francois Erbsmann, the initiator of IPMI, and organizer of the first conference in 1969 in Brussels. Francois always emphasized that the backbone of the IPMI meetings should be promising young and active researchers rather than established scientists in the field. As an appreciation of this idea, and in thankful remembrance of Francois' stimulating work, the IPMI-board has taken the initiative to present the Francois Erbsmann prize for the most significant contribution to the conference by a young investigator.

  • Hawaiian Modern - The Architecture of Vladimir Ossipoff

    An illuminating study of the architecture of one of the 20th century's most important tropical modernists



    Vladimir Ossipoff (1907-1998), known as the "master of Hawaiian architecture," was at the forefront of the postwar phenomenon known as tropical modernism. Although he practiced at a time of rapid growth and social change in Hawai`i, Ossipoff criticized large-scale development and advocated environmentally sensitive designs, developing a distinctive form of architecture appropriate to the lush topography, microclimates, and vernacular traditions of the Hawaiian islands.

    This stunning book, now available for the first time in paperback, surveys Ossipoff's buildings, which demonstrate a striking interplay of indoor and outdoor space, as well as a vibrant and glamorous architectural style that has proven delightfully particular to its place and durable over time.


  • Terrestrial Space Radiation and Its Biological Effects

    x

  • Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology: Festschrift in Honor of Eugene Wigner

    Our volume in the annual review series on this occasion represents a departure from our usual practice in that it serves as a Festschrift for Eugene Wigner. Dr. Wigner has won many honours in his long, wide ranging and distinguished career spanning so many upheavals in civilized life. The editors and the authors, indeed the whole nuclear engineering community, will wish to join in a modest but further acknowledgement of the contributions he has made to nuclear engineering, not least to the morality and professionalism of nuclear engineering in a year that has raised such international concerns over safety. It suffices to make a bald statement of Eugene Wigner's life and times here, for the first article of the volume is a loving appreciation by his long-time colleague, Alvin Weinberg, an evaluation of his contribution historically during and after the Second World War but equally an account of the philosophy which Wigner provided to the burgeoning profession. Eugene Wigner was born 17th November, 1902 in Budapest, Hungary and his early schooling is described by Dr. Weinberg.

  • Modern Painters, Old Masters: The Art of Imitation from the Pre-Raphaelites to the First World War

    With the rise of museums in the 19th century, including the formation in 1824 of the National Gallery in London, as well as the proliferation of widely available published reproductions, the art of the past became visible and accessible in Victorian England as never before. Inspired by the work of Sandro Botticelli, Jan van Eyck, Diego Velazquez, and others, British artists elevated contemporary art to new heights through a creative process that emphasized imitation and emulation. Elizabeth Prettejohn analyzes the ways in which the Old Masters were interpreted by critics, curators, and scholars, and argues that Victorian artists were, paradoxically, at their most original when they imitated the Old Masters most faithfully. Covering the arc of Victorian art from the Pre-Raphaelites through to the early modernists, this volume traces the ways in which artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, and William Orpen engaged with the art of the past and produced some of the greatest art of the later 19th century.

  • Origins, Invention, Revision: Studying the History of Art and Architecture

    An illuminating collection of essays from the preeminent scholar of architectural history and theory

    One of the most distinguished scholars in the fields of architectural history and theory today, James Sloss Ackerman is best known for his work on Italian masters such as Palladio and Michelangelo. In this collection of essays, Ackerman offers insight into his formation and development as a scholar, as well as reflections on a range of topics. Concise, lucid, and original, this book presents deep syntheses alongside innovative approaches and a broadening geographical and chronological reach. Ackerman's enduring fascination with architecture was one unforeseen consequence of his military service in World War II, and the collection includes a revealing account of his part in the liberation of Milan as a soldier in the Fifth American Regiment. These essays represent a unique, personal journey--from the Italian Renaissance to the classical architecture of India and the work of Frank Gehry at the new museum of the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris.

  • Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism 1910-1950

    A comprehensive look at four transformative decades that put Mexico's modern art on the map

    In the wake of the 1910-20 Revolution, Mexico emerged as a center of modern art, closely watched around the world. Highlighted are the achievements of the tres grandes (three greats)--Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros--and other renowned figures such as Rufino Tamayo and Frida Kahlo, but the book goes beyond these well-known names to present a fuller picture of the period from 1910 to 1950.

    Fourteen essays by authors from both the United States and Mexico offer a thorough reassessment of Mexican modernism from multiple perspectives. Some of the texts delve into thematic topics--developments in mural painting, the role of the government in the arts, intersections between modern art and cinema, and the impact of Mexican art in the United States--while others explore specific modernist genres--such as printmaking, photography, and architecture. This beautifully illustrated book offers a comprehensive look at the period that brought Mexico onto the world stage during a period of political upheaval and dramatic social change.

  • Figuring History: Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas

    Contemporary artists Robert Colescott (1925-2009), Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955), and Mickalene Thomas (b. 1971) are distinguished by their attention to a history of representation, which they re-visit and revise to reflect on individual and collective Black experience. Equally engaged with social and political histories, and the history of art, Colescott, Marshall, and Thomas have created works that at times poignantly and satirically critique dominant narratives and posit alternatives. By considering these artists together, this thought-provoking book expands our understanding of contemporary history painting, a genre first defined during the 17th century and known for didactic paintings that often depicted Biblical or mythological subjects, and expressed the tastes and narratives of a ruling class. Colescott, Marshall, and Thomas marry appreciation of these traditional forms of representation to a deep understanding of contemporary American culture to create insightful works that disrupt historic narratives and read canonic art history against the grain.

  • In Situ Expression of Tumor Immunity: Contemporary Topics in Immunobiology

    Because of several valid (and some invalid) reasons, the research field of tumor immunology has been declining in popularity. The Simplistic dogmas, articles of faith, and theories of the late 1960s and early 1970s on the immuno- logical mechanisms of the host-tumor interrelationships have frequently been refuted by some of the new developments in cancer biology, cancer biochem- istry, and immunology. Furthermore, some of the conventional assays used to monitor "tumor-host immune relations" did not always reflect the host's true clinical situation or his prognosis. Several approaches to immunological interven- tion were less successful than expected. In addition, the concept of "immune surveillance," which was basic to many researchers in the field of cancer im- munology, seemed to fall apart. Much of the criticism was based on results from solid, well-performed, and well-controlled experiments, but there was also un- just criticism based on ill-conceived and badly performed studies, and on misin- terpretations of experimental data. There are many misconceptions about the tumor-host relationship. It is very often assumed that tumor immunity, as expressed systemically, is truly reflected at the tumor site. Several studies reported in this volume and elsewhere indicate that such is not always the case. Certain immune effectors may be selectively prevented from reaching the tumor site or the close vicinity of the tumor cells because of mechanical or chemical barriers, whereas others may be selectively attracted to the site by chemotaxis or other mechanisms.

  • Digital Seismology and Fine Modeling of the Lithosphere

    Proceedings of the International School of Applied Geophysics on [title] held March 1987, Erice, Italy. Presents updated seismic techniques for the exploration of the shallower structure of the Earth as well as for the understanding of the dynamic processes taking place in the crust and upper mantle. Also the theoretical background leading to techn

  • Darkroom Techniques

    This text covers a selection of printing and image manipulation techniques aimed at encouraging creative experimentation with whatever equipment, from simple home kit to fully equipped darkroom, is available.

  • Grave New World: The End of Globalization, The Return of History

    A controversial look at the end of globalization and what it means for prosperity, peace, and the global economic order

    Globalization, long considered the best route to economic prosperity, is not inevitable. An approach built on the principles of free trade and, since the 1980s, open capital markets, is beginning to fracture. With disappointing growth rates across the Western world, nations are no longer willing to sacrifice national interests for global growth; nor are their leaders able--or willing--to sell the idea of pursuing a global agenda of prosperity to their citizens.

    Combining historical analysis with current affairs, economist Stephen D. King provides a provocative and engaging account of why globalization is being rejected, what a world ruled by rival states with conflicting aims might look like, and how the pursuit of nationalist agendas could result in a race to the bottom. King argues that a rejection of globalization and a return to "autarky" will risk economic and political conflict, and he uses lessons from history to gauge how best to avoid the worst possible outcomes.

  • A Little History of Economics

    A lively, inviting account of the history of economics, told through events from ancient to modern times and the ideas of great thinkers in the field
    What causes poverty? Are economic crises inevitable under capitalism? Is government intervention in an economy a helpful approach or a disastrous idea? The answers to such basic economic questions matter to everyone, yet the unfamiliar jargon and math of economics can seem daunting. This clear, accessible, and even humorous book is ideal for young readers new to economics and for all readers who seek a better understanding of the full sweep of economic history and ideas.

    Economic historian Niall Kishtainy organizes short, chronological chapters that center on big ideas and events. He recounts the contributions of key thinkers including Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and others, while examining topics ranging from the invention of money and the rise of agrarianism to the Great Depression, entrepreneurship, environmental destruction, inequality, and behavioral economics. The result is a uniquely enjoyable volume that succeeds in illuminating the economic ideas and forces that shape our world.

  • The Virtual University: An Action Paradigm and Process for Workplace Learning

    In the 21st century, this book predicts that adults will learn new things in different ways and at different times. It outlines how workplace learning will develop over the next few years. It shows, through examples, how some organizations are already leading the way. As workplace skills become increasingly important, this book shows how new technology can help to increase those skills.

  • Local Density Theory of Polarizability

    During the past decade the theoretical physics community has learned how to evaluate accurately polarizabilities and susceptibilities for many-electron systems such as atoms, solids, and liquids. The most accurate numerical technique employs a method often called the Time-Dependent Local Density Approximation, which is abbreviated TDLDA. The present volume is a review of recent research on the theory of po- larizabilities and susceptibilities. Both authors have been doing these cal- culations. However, this review surveys the entire field, summarizing the research of many contributors. The application of an external field, either ac or de, will induce a dipole moment which can be calculated and compared with experiment. For mod- erately strong fields, both linear and nonlinear processes contribute to the moment. We cover topics such as polarizability, hyperpolarizability, pho- toionization, phonons, and piezoelectricity. Density functional theory in the Local Density Approximation (LDA) has been shown to be a very accurate method for calculating ground state prop- erties of electronic system. For static external fields, the induced moments are properties of the ground state. Then the calculation of the polarizability - is very accurate. For ac fields, the moment is not part of the ground state. However, the TDLDA methods are still very accurate.

  • The Only Game in Town: Central Banks, Instability, and Avoiding the Next Collapse

    An incisive analysis of the state of the global economy and what the future holds. Surrounded by sluggish growth, high rates of unemployment, rising inequality, growing financial instability and increased social tensions, pessimism about our future abounds. Dr. Mohamed A. El-Erian, one of the world's most influential economic thinkers, explains lucidly the realities of the economic choices that we will soon face. The path that the global economy and markets are on is ending. But what comes thereafter is far from predestined. It critically depends on choices that we make as households and companies, and decisions that our political representatives take. The Only Game in Town details how the world is increasingly being shaken, both from above and from below. It illuminates the growing internal contradictions, the constraints that are undermining growth and prosperity, and the radical overhaul in thinking that is required. In the aftermath of the financial crisis, central banks were handed responsibility for the fate of the global economy. Lifting the veil on the inner workings of these powerful and innovative institutions, El-Erian explains why they cannot save us this time around. Laying out a road map for growth, The Only Game in Town shows how and why collaboration between central bankers, policymakers and business leaders is essential. Drawing on insights from behavioral science, economics and finance, this book provides the tools needed to understand the uncertainties that lie ahead and return us to a path of prosperity. Thought provoking and insightful, this book is required reading for investors, policymakers, and anyone interested in the future.

  • Listening In: Cybersecurity in an Insecure Age

    A cybersecurity expert and former Google privacy analyst's urgent call to protect devices and networks against malicious hackers​

    New technologies have provided both incredible convenience and new threats. The same kinds of digital networks that allow you to hail a ride using your smartphone let power grid operators control a country's electricity--and these personal, corporate, and government systems are all vulnerable. In Ukraine, unknown hackers shut off electricity to nearly 230,000 people for six hours. North Korean hackers destroyed networks at Sony Pictures in retaliation for a film that mocked Kim Jong-un. And Russian cyberattackers leaked Democratic National Committee emails in an attempt to sway a U.S. presidential election.

    And yet despite such documented risks, government agencies, whose investigations and surveillance are stymied by encryption, push for a weakening of protections. In this accessible and riveting read, Susan Landau makes a compelling case for the need to secure our data, explaining how we must maintain cybersecurity in an insecure age.

  • Catalytic Ammonia Synthesis: Fundamentals and Practice

    The phenomenon of catalysis is found in many homogeneous and heterogeneous systems undergoing chemical change, where it effects the rates of approach to the equilibrium state in processes as diverse as those found in the stars, the earth's mantle, living organisms, and the various chemistries utilized by industry. The economies and the living standards of both developed and developing countries depend to varying degrees upon the efficacy of their chemical industries. Con- sequently, this century has seen a wide exploration and expansion of catalytic chemistry together with an intensive investigation of specific, essential processes like those contributing to life-supporting agricultures. Prime among the latter must surely be the "fixation" of atmospheric nitrogen by catalytic hydrogenation to anhydrous ammonia, still the preferred synthetic precursor of the nitrogenous components of fertilizers. In each decade contemporary concepts and techniques have been used to further the understanding, as yet incomplete, of the catalyst, the adsorbates, the surface reactions, and the technology of large-scale operation. The contributors to the present volume review the state of the art, the science, and the technology; they reveal existing lacunae, and suggest ways forward. Around the turn of the century, Sabatier's school was extending the descriptive catalytic chemistry of hydrogenation by metals to include almost all types of multiple bond. The triple bond of dinitrogen, which continued to be more resistant than the somewhat similar bonds in carbon monoxide and ethyne, defied their efforts.

  • Understanding Duplicate Pairs

    Few of the millions of rubber bridge players ever play duplicate, but it is rare to find anyone who has played the game who has not become addicted to it.
    This book explains clearly the tactics employed in good duplicate pairs ? why the bidding is highly competitive and why overtricks are at a premium. Written by two top bridge teachers who are also world-famous authors ? Ron Klinger is in addition a celebrated International player ? UNDERSTANDING DUPLICATE PAIRS will enable any competent bridge player to play duplicate with confidence ? and success.

  • Computer-Enhanced Analytical Spectroscopy

    The Second Hidden Peak Symposium on Computer-Enhanced Analytical Spectroscopy, held in June, 1988, at the Snowbird Resort (Salt Lake City, Utah), centered around twelve keynote lectures delivered by some of the foremost experts and pioneers in this rapidly expanding field. The editor is highly indebted to each of these colleagues for contributing a chapter to the second volume of Computer-Enhanced Analytical Spec- troscopy. The primary objective of this volume is to present a repre- sentative cross-section of current activities in the field while balancing out the lighter coverage of some topics and areas in Volume 1. An exciting new topic, remote IR sensing, is covered in Chapters 4 and 5. Deconvolution and signal-processing methods have now been extended to UV/VIS (Chapter 1) and GC/MS (Chapter 3) applications. Furthermore, the development and testing of novel factor analysis techniques in the areas of UV /VIS and IR spectroscopy are discussed in Chapters 2 and 12, respectively. Fundamental aspects of library search techniques are presented in Chapters 7 (MS) and 9 (NMR). Chapters 6, 10, and 11 cover selected uses of expert systems in NMR, IR, and MS, respectively. Finally, an integrated expert system approach to the interpretation of GC/IR/MS data is outlined in Chapter 8. In an attempt to facilitate access to the various topics for the newcomer to the field, the twelve chapters have been organized into two main parts: Unsupervised Methods: Spectral Enhancement, Deconvolu- tion, and Data Reduction, and Supervised Methods: Expert Systems, Modeling, and Quantitation.

  • Eugene O'neill: A Life in Four Acts

    A major new biography of the Nobel Prize-winning playwright whose brilliantly original plays revolutionized American theater

    Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize

    This extraordinary new biography fully captures the intimacies of Eugene O'Neill's tumultuous life and the profound impact of his work on American drama. Robert M. Dowling innovatively recounts O'Neill's life in four acts, thus highlighting how the stories he told for the stage interweave with his actual life stories. Each episode also uncovers how O'Neill's work was utterly intertwined with, and galvanized by, the culture and history of his time.

    Much is new in this extensively researched book: connections between O'Neill's plays and his political and philosophical worldview; insights into his Irish upbringing and lifelong torment over losing faith in God; his vital role in African American cultural history; unpublished photographs, including a unique offstage picture of him with his lover Louise Bryant; new evidence of O'Neill's desire to become a novelist and what this reveals about his unique dramatic voice; and a startling revelation about the release of Long Day's Journey Into Night in defiance of his explicit instructions. This biography is also the first to discuss O'Neill's lost play Exorcism (a single copy of which was only recently recovered), a dramatization of his own suicide attempt.

    Written with lively informality yet a scholar's strict accuracy, Eugene O'Neill: A Life in Four Acts is a biography that America's foremost playwright richly deserves.

  • Mel Bochner Voices

    Mel Bochner (b. 1940) is recognized as one of the leading figures in the development of Conceptual art in New York in the 1960s and 1970s. He pioneered the introduction of the use of language in the visual, probing the way they relate to one another to make us more attentive to the unspoken codes that underpin our visual engagement with the world.

    Featuring color plates of more than thirty new, previously unpublished paintings, and accompanied by an essay by Jeremy Sigler, this handsome publication offers a new perspective on Mel Bochner's career-long engagement with language and painting. Sigler points to how Bochner's newest images poignantly signal a return to visceral materiality, revealing the unexpected painterly roots of his body of work.

  • All You Want Is Money, All You Need Is Love: Sex and Romance in Modern India

    An examination of India's bourgeois, its lifestyle and aspirations as manifested in fiction and film. It begins by looking at heroines and notions of idealized womanhood in a historical perspective, and examines how these are reworked in modern narratives, how conflicts are resolved and new models developed. A major theme is the redefinition of love and romance among the Indian middle classes, as part of the creation of a bourgeois individual revolving around love, romance and marriage. The book concentrates on the most radical of India's metropolitan bourgeoisies, that of the city of Mumbai (Bombay).

  • Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis and Immunological Techniques

    This text is a summary of basic principles and techniques and is dedicated to all those students who have been told by their mentors, "Go forth and do two-dimensional gels and have the results on my desk tomorrow. " No attempt has been made in this text to provide exhaustive lists of references related to basic principles or techniques or to list every com- pany or supplier involved in this area of research. Nevertheless, it is hoped that sufficient information is given to help a new investigator or student appreciate the complexities but develop sufficient expertise to carry out these techniques successfully. The discussions are designed to instill in basic science and clinical investigators of all levels of expertise an appreciation of the power of combining a variety of techniques as well as to provide basic insight into the theories, complexities, and problems frequently encountered with electrophoretic and immunochemical meth- ods. Bonnie S. Dunbar Houston v Acknowledgments I wish to thank my students and staff for their patience and support throughout the preparation of this text. I would like to acknowledge my appreciation for my extensive discussions with Dr. David Sammons (Uni- versity of Arizona) and to Dr. N. L. and Dr. N. G. Anderson and their colleagues (Argonne National Laboratory) for their invaluable advice and suggestions in this area over the years. I thank my research assistant, Ms.

  • The Tunnels of Cu Chi: A Remarkable Story of War

    The story of an extraordinary campaign in the Vietnam War - fought in a 200-mile labyrinth of underground tunnels and chambers.

    The campaign in the tunnels of Cu Chi was fought with cunning and savagery between Viet Cong guerrillas and special teams of US infantrymen called 'Tunnel Rats'. The location: the 200-mile labyrinth of underground tunnels and secret chambers that the Viet Cong had dug around Saigon.

    The Tunnel Rats were GIs of legendary skill and courage. Armed only with knives and pistols, they fought hand-to-hand against a cruel and ingenious enemy inside the booby-trapped blackness of the tunnels. For the Viet Cong the tunnel network became their battlefield, their barracks, their arms factories and their hospitals, as the ground above was pounded to dust by American shells and bombs.

  • Metal Interactions With Boron Clusters

    Molecular clusters, in the broad sense that the term is commonly understood, today comprise an enormous class of species extending into virtually every important area of chemistry: "naked" metal clusters, transition metal carbonyl clusters, hydrocarbon cages such as cubane (C H ) and dodecahedrane (C H ), 8 8 20 20 organometallic cluster complexes, enzymes containing Fe S or MoFe S 4 4 3 4 cores, high polymers based on carborane units, and, of course, the many kinds of polyhedral borane species. So large is the area spanned by these diverse classes that any attempt to deal with them comprehensively in one volume would, to say the least, be ambitious-and also premature. We are presently at a stage where intriguing relationships between the various cluster families are becoming apparent (particularly in terms of bonding descriptions), and despite large dif- ferences in their chemistry an underlying unity is gradually developing in the field. For example, structural changes occurring in Fe S cores as electrons are 4 4 pumped in and out, in some measure resemble those observed in boranes and carboranes. The cleavage of alkynes via incorporation into carborane cages and subsequent cage rearrangement, a sequence familiar to boron chemists, is a thermodynamically favored process which may be related to the behavior of unsaturated hydrocarbons on metal surfaces; analogies of this sort have drawn attention from theorists and experimentalists.

  • Alex Katz - This Is Now

    A handsomely illustrated look at the landscape paintings of a contemporary American master

    Over the course of a seven-decade career, American artist Alex Katz (b. 1927) has conveyed his singular vision of the world through paintings that fuse realism and abstraction, allowing details to dissolve into bold swaths of color. Though perhaps best known for his portraits, Katz has consistently painted the natural world throughout his career, particularly over the past decade. This beautiful publication takes a fresh look at his landscape paintings through the themes of nature, perception, the passage of time, and contemporary notions of the sublime. These works reveal the American painter's virtuosic control of materials and the absolute clarity and power of his vision, made evident by stripping away unnecessary information to capture the essence of his subjects. Featuring works of art from the 1950s to today, Alex Katz, This Is Now is the most extensive look at Katz's treatment of landscape in nearly 20 years. The book includes essays by curator Michael Rooks, art critic Margaret Graham, and David Salle--an artist whose own work is influenced by Katz--and poems by John Godfrey and Vincent Katz, who is an art critic as well as the artist's son, providing a timely and important new assessment of the work of this renowned artist.

  • The Witch: A History of Fear, from Ancient Times to the Present

    Why have societies all across the world feared witchcraft? This book delves deeply into its context, beliefs, and origins in Europe's history

    The witch came to prominence--and often a painful death--in early modern Europe, yet her origins are much more geographically diverse and historically deep. In this landmark book, Ronald Hutton traces witchcraft from the ancient world to the early-modern stake.

    This book sets the notorious European witch trials in the widest and deepest possible perspective and traces the major historiographical developments of witchcraft. Hutton, a renowned expert on ancient, medieval, and modern paganism and witchcraft beliefs, combines Anglo-American and continental scholarly approaches to examine attitudes on witchcraft and the treatment of suspected witches across the world, including in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Australia, and North and South America, and from ancient pagan times to current interpretations. His fresh anthropological and ethnographical approach focuses on cultural inheritance and change while considering shamanism, folk religion, the range of witch trials, and how the fear of witchcraft might be eradicated.

  • Diagnostic Dysmorphology

    This text provides a systematic approach to the diagnosis of children with multiple birth defects. It outlines the embryologic origins of normal and abnormal physical development, describes the major and minor structural anomalies in each of 20 anatomic regions, and teaches techniques of observation and synthesis useful in dysmorphologic diagnosis. Medical specialists will find Dr. Aase's book invaluable both as an instructive tool and as a clinical reference guide.

  • Revelation - A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary

    In this landmark commentary, Craig R. Koester offers a comprehensive look at a powerful and controversial early Christian text, the book of Revelation. Originally written for Christian communities in Asia Minor, Revelation depicts scenes of cosmic conflict in which God, the creator of the world, overcomes the forces of destruction and makes all things new. This often misunderstood portion of the New Testament repeatedly surprises readers by warning that judgment is imminent, only to interrupt the visions of terror with messages of hope and redemption.

    Koester provides richly textured descriptions of the book's setting and language, making extensive use of Greek and Latin inscriptions, classical texts, and ancient Jewish writings, including the Dead Sea Scrolls. While Revelation has often been viewed as world-negating, this commentary focuses on its deep engagement with social, religious, and economic issues. It also addresses the book's volatile history of interpretation and its cultural impact over the centuries. The result is a groundbreaking study that provides powerful insights and sets new directions for the continued appreciation of this visionary religious text.

  • Henry the Young King, 1155-1183

    This first modern study of Henry the Young King, eldest son of Henry II but the least known Plantagenet monarch, explores the brief but eventful life of the only English ruler after the Norman Conquest to be created co-ruler in his father's lifetime. Crowned at fifteen to secure an undisputed succession, Henry played a central role in the politics of Henry II's great empire and was hailed as the embodiment of chivalry. Yet, consistently denied direct rule, the Young King was provoked first into heading a major rebellion against his father, then to waging a bitter war against his brother Richard for control of Aquitaine, dying before reaching the age of thirty having never assumed actual power. In this remarkable history, Matthew Strickland provides a richly colored portrait of an all-but-forgotten royal figure tutored by Thomas Becket, trained in arms by the great knight William Marshal, and incited to rebellion by his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine, while using his career to explore the nature of kingship, succession, dynastic politics, and rebellion in twelfth-century England and France.

  • Magnetism Diagrams for Transition Metal Ions

    The study ofmagneticproperties as a method to determine molecularand electronic structure of the ground state has a long tradition, in particular as far as metal complexes and solids of the transition metals are concerned. In the early days of the development, the emphasiswas placedon the observation ofdeviationsfrom the "spin-only" magnetic moment, the underlying assumption being that the value of themomentatroomtemperaturewouldsufficetodetermine boththeoxidationstate of the metal and the stereochemistry of the complex. The increasing number of deviations from these simple rules shifted the interest of researchers to the more detailed study ofthe temperature dependence of the magnetic moment. Most of the experimentalresults was then limited to measurementson powderedsubstancesand totemperatures between 77 and 300 K. Although themajorityofdataarestillofthis type, magnetic studies down to or even below 4. 2 K have become more common within the last few years as the sophistication of the equipment has increased. In addition, the investigation of magnetic anisotropies and principal magnetic suscep tibilities received a new impetus. In order to make the best possible use of the theory, magnetism diagrams based on calculations by the ligand field theory were produced. As a rule, these diagrams show the effective magnetic moment as a function of the temperature and of any N additional parameters of interest. The first magnetism diagrams applicable to d electronicconfigurationswerepublished 30 yearsago byKotani. Thesediagrams are limited to the configurations (t2g)N, N = 1 to 4, in octahedral symmetry."

  • The Guggenheim: Frank Lloyd Wright's Iconoclastic Masterpiece

    The captivating tale of the plans and personalities behind one of New York City's most radical and recognizable buildings

    Considered the crowning achievement of Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan is often called iconic. But it is in fact iconoclastic, standing in stark contrast to the surrounding metropolis and setting a new standard for the postwar art museum. Commissioned to design the building in 1943 by the museum's founding curator, Baroness Hilla von Rebay, Wright established residence in the Plaza Hotel in order to oversee the project. Over the next 17 years, Wright continuously clashed with his clients over the cost and the design, a conflict that extended to the city of New York and its cultural establishment.

    Against all odds, Wright held fast to his radical design concept of an inverted ziggurat and spiraling ramp, built with a continuous beam--a shape recalling the form of an hourglass. Construction was only completed in 1959, six months after Wright's death. The building's initial critical response ultimately gave way to near-universal admiration, as it came to be seen as an architectural masterpiece. This essential text, offering a behind-the-scenes story of the Guggenheim along with a careful reading of its architecture, is beautifully illustrated with more than 150 images, including plans, drawings, and rare photographs of the building under construction.

  • Immunopharmacology Reviews

    Immunopharmacology as a field of scientific endeavor had its origins more than thirty years ago in the application of antibody-based techniques to assays of hormones and drugs in tissues and body fluids. More recently, the field has been redefined to include a primary focus on the immune system as a target of xenobiotic action. Advances in the field of immunology have made it apparent that the immune system, like other organ systems, declines in its function as a result of aging, viral infections like AIDS, and other immunotoxic influences, giving rise to secondary immunodeficiency. Deficiencyof the immune system in turn leads to infections, autoimmune diseases, and an increased incidence of certain cancers. The notion of treating the failing immune system is relatively new; however, more than a decade of research on cancer and AIDS has created the burgeoning new clinical field of immunotherapy. Immunopharmacology then stands as the preclinical and clinical science of immune manipulation. As such, like its parent field of pharmacology, it includes within its scope basic studies of immune mechanisms as they relate to the pathogenesis of inflammation and immunologic disturbances. As with pharma- cology, the perspective is always a therapeutic one. Studies of immune and inflammatory processes emphasize the use of pharmacologic probes and drugs to elucidate the underlying biochemical pharmacology.

  • The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World


    A new edition of the best-selling classic - published with a special introduction to mark its tenth anniversary.

    'A veritable tour de force, gradually and skilfully revealed. I know of no better exposition of the current state of functional brain neuroscience.'--W. F. Bynum, TLS. 'A profound examination.'--Philip Pullman. 'Persuasively argues that our society is suffering from the consequences of an over-dominant left hemisphere losing touch with its natural regulative `master' the right. Brilliant and disturbing.'--Salley Vickers, a Guardian 'Best Book of the Year'. 'Clear, penetrating, lively, thorough and fascinating. . . . I couldn't put it down.'--Mary Midgley, The Guardian

  • Molecular Characterization of Composite Interfaces

    This book is an extended version of the proceedings of the Symposium on Polymer Composites, Interfaces, which was held under the auspices of the Division of Polymer Chemistry, American Chemical Society (ACS) during the annual ACS meeting in Seattle, March, 1983. The importance of the interface in composite materials has been recognized since the inception of modern composite technology. Specifically, silane coupling agents were developed for glass fiber reinforced compOSites at a very early date. Ever since then the diversity of composite materials and the development of various surface treatment methods have led to the establishment of an "interface art." A trial-and-error approach has dominated the interfacial aspects of composite technology until very recently. With the advent of modern analytical techniques for surface characterization, it became possible to study detailed surface and interface structures. It was hoped that this symposium would catalyze such a fundamental and scientific approach in composite studies. For this reason, the symposium was structured to verify the influence of interfacial structures on the mechanical and physical performance of composites and to improve our knowledge of the microstructure of composite interfaces. As the word -composite" indicates, interdisciplinary interaction is indispensable for proper understanding of multiphase systems.

  • Matthew Barney: Otto Trilogy

    A generously illustrated look at the intricate narrative threads of three of the artist's earliest works, and their continued resonance today

    Celebrated for works blending performance, video, and sculpture, Matthew Barney has created complex narratives that emerge across series since his earliest exhibitions. Matthew Barney: OTTO Trilogy is the first book to trace the progression of three significant early projects--Facility of INCLINE, Facility of DECLINE, and OTTOshaft-- and to reveal the narrative system that links them. Titled after former football player Jim Otto, the series explores the training, discipline, and physical limits of the body alongside questions of sexual difference and desire. Featuring an illuminating introduction by Nancy Spector; an essay by Maggie Nelson on the works' exploration of psychology, bodies, image-making, narrative, and abstraction; and a new text by the artist, this generously illustrated volume includes previously unpublished artist's sketches, behind-the-scenes photographs, research material, and video stills. It is the definitive publication on this important series, and offers a key to understanding many of the themes that thread throughout Barney's oeuvre.

  • Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet

    A riveting new examination of the leading progressive justice of his era, published in the centennial year of his confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court

    According to Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis was "the Jewish Jefferson," the greatest critic of what he called "the curse of bigness," in business and government, since the author of the Declaration of Independence. Published to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation on June 1, 1916, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet argues that Brandeis was the most farseeing constitutional philosopher of the twentieth century. In addition to writing the most famous article on the right to privacy, he also wrote the most important Supreme Court opinions about free speech, freedom from government surveillance, and freedom of thought and opinion. And as the leader of the American Zionist movement, he convinced Woodrow Wilson and the British government to recognize a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Combining narrative biography with a passionate argument for why Brandeis matters today, Rosen explores what Brandeis, the Jeffersonian prophet, can teach us about historic and contemporary questions involving the Constitution, monopoly, corporate and federal power, technology, privacy, free speech, and Zionism.

  • Ion Chromatography

    Bewitched is an odd word with which to begin a chemical textbook. Yet that is a fair description of how I reacted on first leaming of ion exchange and imagining what might be done with it. That initial fascination has not left me these many years later, and it has provided much ofthe motivation for writing this book. The perceived need for a text on the fundamentals of ion chromatography provided the rest. Many readers will have a general idea of what ion chromatography is and what it does. Briefly, for those who do not, it is an umbrella term for a variety of chromatographie methods for the rapid and sensitive analysis of mixtures of ionic species. It has become highly developed in the last decade, and while it is now routinely used for the determination of organic as weH as inorganic ions, its initial impact was greatest in the area of inorganic analysis. In the past the determination of inorganic ions, particularly anions, meant laborious, time-con- suming, and often not very sensitive "wet chemieal" methods. In the last ten years that has changed radically as ion chromatography has supplanted these older methods.

  • Multicriteria Optimization in Engineering and in the Sciences

    We are rarely asked to. make decisions based on only one criterion; most often, decisions are based on several usually confticting, criteria. In nature, if the design of a system evolves to some final, optimal state, then it must include a balance for the interaction of the system with its surroundings- certainly a design based on a variety of criteria. Furthermore, the diversity of nature's designs suggests an infinity of such optimal states. In another sense, decisions simultaneously optimize a finite number of criteria, while there is usually an infinity of optimal solutions. Multicriteria optimization provides the mathematical framework to accommodate these demands. Multicriteria optimization has its roots in mathematical economics, in particular, in consumer economics as considered by Edgeworth and Pareto. The critical question in an exchange economy concerns the "equilibrium point" at which each of N consumers has achieved the best possible deal for hirnself or herself. Ultimately, this is a collective decision in which any further gain by one consumer can occur only at the expense of at least one other consumer. Such an equilibrium concept was first introduced by Edgeworth in 1881 in his book on mathematical psychics. Today, such an optimum is variously called "Pareto optimum" (after the Italian-French welfare economist who continued and expanded Edgeworth's work), "effi. cient," "nondominated," and so on.

  • Jane Austen: A Brief Life


    Every devoted reader feels that, in some way, they know Jane Austen. But how can we make sense of her extraordinary achievements? At a time when most women received so little formal education and none could obtain a place at university, how did Austen come to write novels that have commanded the attention of some of the most brilliant minds ever since? Why were hers the books that Darwin knew by heart and Churchill read during the Blitz?

    In this graceful introduction to the author's life and works, Fiona Stafford offers a fresh and accessible discussion of Austen's six astonishing novels, set in the context of their time.

    Newly updated, Jane Austen: A Brief Life gives us a rich and sympathetic insight into a writer who was just as much the Romantic genius as Keats, Shelley or Byron full of youthful exuberance, intensely creative once she had found her individual voice, and dead before she reached middle age.

  • Gardening With Flowers

    Combining three "Wisley Handbooks" in a single volume, this gardening companion should be a useful illustrated reference work. The books incorporated in the volume are "Herbaceous Perennials", "Bedding Plants" and "Fragrant and Aromatic Plants".

  • Regional Policy in a Changing World

    Inspired by the realization that, in most countries, the commitment to regional development is determined by national ideological swings rather than the socio-economic conditions in a particular region (here meaning an area smaller than a country). Surveys and evaluates the history of regional polic

  • Advances in X-Ray Analysis

    The 37th Annual Denver Conference on Applications of X-Ray Analysis was held August 1-5, 1988, at the Sheraton Steamboat Resort and Conference Center, Steamboat Springs, Colorado. As usual, alternating with x-ray diffraction, the emphasis this year was x-ray fluorescence, but as has been the pattern for several occasions over the last few years, the Plenary Session did not deal with that subject, specifically. In an attempt to introduce the audience to one of the new developments in x-ray analysis, the title of the session was "High Brilliance Sources/Applications," and dealt exclusively with synchrotron radiation, a topic which has made a very large impact on the x-ray community over the last decade. As the organizer and co-chairman of the Plenary Session (with Paul Predecki), it is my responsibility to report on that session here. The Conference had the privilege of obtaining the services of some of the preeminent practitioners of research using this remarkable x-ray source; they presented the audience with unusually lucid descriptions of the work which has been accomplished in the development and application of the continuous, high intensity, tunable, polarized and collimated x-rays available from no facility other than these specialized storage rings. The opening lecture (and I use that term intentionally) was an enthusiastic description of "What is Synchrotron Radiation?" by Professor Boris Batterman of Cornell University and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Sourc(! (CHESS).

  • Cassell Spelling Dictionary

    This guide lists over 35,000 words, including slang, technical vocabulary and commonly used foreign words. In addition, it shows American and other alternative spellings, distinguishes between commonly confused words and contains guidance notes on spelling rules.

  • The Golden Rules Of Declarer Play

    Who needs rules on how to play as a declarer? The truth is that the instincts people have come to depend upon are often honed from a few basic guidelines. This book provides all those guidelines as well as the reasoning behind them and also explains when you should not follow the rules. By assuming only a minimum of knowledge, the authors have brought the subject within the reach of many players and introduce the beginner gradually by placing the slightly trickier topics towards the end of the book.

  • The Gifted Passage: Young Men in Classic Maya Art and Text

    In this thought-provoking book, preeminent scholar Stephen Houston turns his attention to the crucial role of young males in Classic Maya society, drawing on evidence from art, writing, and material culture. The Gifted Passage establishes that adolescent men in Maya art were the subjects and makers of hieroglyphics, painted ceramics, and murals, in works that helped to shape and reflect masculinity in Maya civilization. The political volatility of the Classic Maya period gave male adolescents valuable status as potential heirs, and many of the most precious surviving ceramics likely celebrated their coming-of-age rituals. The ardent hope was that youths would grow into effective kings and noblemen, capable of leadership in battle and service in royal courts. Aiming to shift mainstream conceptions of the Maya, Houston argues that adolescent men were not simply present in images and texts, but central to both.

  • A Traveller's History of South East Asia

    A lucid and concise introduction to the histories of the modern countries of South East Asia, providing an essential guide for both tourists and the general reader. It spans the history of the region from 'Java Man' some one million years ago to the development of high-tech, sky-scraper cities of the new millennium. South East Asia has always inter-reacted with the wider world, and throughout the book the ability of South East Asians to absorb and adapt alien influences whether from Europe or the rest of Asia - is stressed. Readers will appreciate how South East Asia's soul has been preserved against tremendous external pressures.

  • The Carbonic Anhydrases: Cellular Physiology and Molecular Genetics

    As we approach the twenty-first century the problems of industrialization are evident: we find there is a greenhouse effect, the ozone layer is being depleted, the rain is acidified, and there is a terrible problem of increasing C0 concentrations in the atmo- 2 sphere. The carbonic anhydrases are a unique family of enzymes that solve these problems in the human body: they are responsible for converting C0 (a gas) to 2 HC0-, which is the biggest intracellular buffer, with a concomitant decrease in a 3 hydroxyl ion. Globally, the functions of the carbonic anhydrases in photosynthesis in rain forests and in the algae and plankton that cover our oceans indicate that they are also of utmost importance in the maintenance of the acid-base balance on our planet. Although the whole field of C0 metabolism is enormous and still rapidly 2 expanding, because of the research interests of the editors this book is mainly concerned with mammalian carbonic anhydrases. However, if the interested reader intends to purify carbonic anhydrases from nonmammalian sources, Dr. Cheg- widden has provided the necessary information in Chapter 7. The carbonic anhydrases were first discovered in 1933; until1976 there were thought to be only two isozymes. Since then CA ill, IY, V, VI, and Vll have been discovered and well characterized. There is, of course, no reason to believe that we have found them all.

  • Progress in Medical Radiation Physics

    The Progress in Medical Radiation Physics series presents in-depth reviews of many of the significant developments resulting from the application of physics to medicine. This series is intended to span the gap between research papers published in scientific journals, which tend to lack details, and complete textbooks or theses, which are usually far more detailed than necessary to provide a working knowledge of the subject. Each chapter in this series is designed to provide just enough information to enable readers to both fully understand the development described and apply the technique or concept, if they so desire. Thorough references are provided for those who wish to consider the original literature. In this way, it is hoped that the Progress in Medical Radiation Physics series will be a catalyst encouraging medical physicists to apply new techniques and developments in their daily practice. Colin G. Orton ix Contents 1-1. The Tracking Cobalt Project: From Moving-Beam Therapy to Three-Dimensional Programmed Irradiation W. A. Jennings 1. Introduction 2. Establishing Moving-Beam Techniques at the Royal Northern Hospital, 1945-1955 4 2.1. Alternative Moving-Beam Techniques 4 2.2.

  • The Paston Treasure: Microcosm of the Known World

    The Paston Treasure, a spectacular painting from the 1660s now held at Norwich Castle Museum, depicts a wealth of objects from the collection of a local landed family. This deeply researched volume uses the painting as a portal to the history of the collection, exploring the objects, their context, and the wider world they occupied. Drawing on an impressive range of fields, including history of art and collections, technical art history, musicology, history of science, and the social and cultural history of the 17th century, the book weaves together narratives of the family and their possessions, as well as the institutions that eventually acquired them. Essays, vignettes, and catalogue entries comprise this multidisciplinary exposition, uniting objects depicted in the painting for the first time in nearly 300 years.

  • Epic Tales from Ancient India: Paintings from the San Diego Museum of Art

    Exploring the topic of narrativity in Indian art, this beautiful and deeply researched book considers illustrations to the Bhagavata Purana, the Ramayana, the Ragamala, and a range of texts in the Persian language, notably the Shahnama. Featuring stunning reproductions of paintings made between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries from the Edwin Binney 3rd Collection at The San Diego Museum of Art, the publication includes thorough and fascinating explanations of the narrative of each text, including how that narrative is visually conveyed. Essays examine why these particular stories are so enduring, why patrons may have chosen to have a copy of a particular text made for their own collections, and how artists responded to the challenge of creating new versions of venerable classics.

  • Mossbauer Spectroscopy Applied to Inorganic Chemistry

    Volume 2 presents the latest applications of M ssbauer spectroscopy to the study of magnetic materials. Topics include: Surface and thin film analysis, iron-based amorphous ribbons and wires, diffusion studies, analytical methods for M ssbauer spectral analysis of complex materials, and quasicrystalline materials among others. These discussions will be invaluable to materials scientists, inorganic chemists, and solid-state chemists.

  • Hell No: The Forgotten Power of the Vietnam Peace Movement

    Why those who protested the Vietnam War must be honored, remembered, and appreciated

    "Hell no" was the battle cry of the largest peace movement in American history--the effort to end the Vietnam War, which included thousands of veterans. The movement was divided among radicals, revolutionaries, sectarians, moderates, and militants, which legions of paid FBI informants and government provocateurs tried to destroy. Despite these obstacles millions marched, resisted the draft on campuses, and forced two sitting presidents from office. This movement was a watershed in our history, yet today it is in danger of being forgotten, condemned by its critics for everything from cowardice to stab-in-the-back betrayal.

    In this indispensable essay, Tom Hayden, a principal anti-Vietnam War organizer, calls to account elites who want to forget the Vietnam peace movement and excoriates those who trivialize its impact, engage in caricature of protesters and question their patriotism. In so doing, he seeks both a reckoning and a healing of national memory.

  • Sarah Osborn's World: The Rise of Evangelical Christianity in Early America

    A charismatic leader among eighteenth-century American evangelical Christians, Sarah Osborn recorded the details of her life and spiritual quest for more than thirty years. Her eloquent writings open a new window on the roots of the evangelical movement.

  • A Little History of Archaeology

    The thrilling history of archaeological adventure, with tales of danger, debate, audacious explorers, and astonishing discoveries around the globe

    What is archaeology? The word may bring to mind images of golden pharaohs and lost civilizations, or Neanderthal skulls and Ice Age cave art. Archaeology is all of these, but also far more: the only science to encompass the entire span of human history--more than three million years!

    This Little History tells the riveting stories of some of the great archaeologists and their amazing discoveries around the globe: ancient Egyptian tombs, Mayan ruins, the first colonial settlements at Jamestown, mysterious Stonehenge, the incredibly preserved Pompeii, and many, many more. In forty brief, exciting chapters, the book recounts archaeology's development from its eighteenth-century origins to its twenty-first-century technological advances, including remote sensing capabilities and satellite imagery techniques that have revolutionized the field. Shining light on the most intriguing events in the history of the field, this absolutely up-to-date book illuminates archaeology's controversies, discoveries, heroes and scoundrels, global sites, and newest methods for curious readers of every age.

  • Conversations in Jazz: The Ralph J. Gleason Interviews

    An extraordinary collection of revealing, personal interviews with fourteen jazz music legends

    During his nearly forty years as a music journalist, Ralph J. Gleason recorded many in-depth interviews with some of the greatest jazz musicians of all time. These informal sessions, conducted mostly in Gleason's Berkeley, California, home, have never been transcribed and published in full until now.

    This remarkable volume, a must-read for any jazz fan, serious musician, or musicologist, reveals fascinating, little-known details about these gifted artists, their lives, their personas, and, of course, their music. Bill Evans discusses his battle with severe depression, while John Coltrane talks about McCoy Tyner's integral role in shaping the sound of the Coltrane quartet, praising the pianist enthusiastically. Included also are interviews with Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins, Quincy Jones, Jon Hendricks, and the immortal Duke Ellington, plus seven more of the most notable names in twentieth-century jazz.

  • The Story of Greece and Rome

    The extraordinary story of the intermingled civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, spanning more than six millennia from the late Bronze Age to the seventh century

    The magnificent civilization created by the ancient Greeks and Romans is the greatest legacy of the classical world. However, narratives about the "civilized" Greek and Roman empires resisting the barbarians at the gate are far from accurate. Tony Spawforth, an esteemed scholar, author, and media contributor, follows the thread of civilization through more than six millennia of history. His story reveals that Greek and Roman civilization, to varying degrees, was supremely and surprisingly receptive to external influences, particularly from the East.

    From the rise of the Mycenaean world of the sixteenth century B.C., Spawforth traces a path through the ancient Aegean to the zenith of the Hellenic state and the rise of the Roman empire, the coming of Christianity and the consequences of the first caliphate. Deeply informed, provocative, and entirely fresh, this is the first and only accessible work that tells the extraordinary story of the classical world in its entirety.

  • Art and Optics in the Hereford Map: An English Mappa Mundi, C. 1300

    A single, monumental mappa mundi (world map), made around 1300 for Hereford Cathedral, survives intact from the Middle Ages. As Marcia Kupfer reveals in her arresting new study, this celebrated testament to medieval learning has long been profoundly misunderstood. Features of the colored and gilded map that baffle modern expectations are typically dismissed as the product of careless execution. Kupfer argues that they should rightly be seen as part of the map's encoded commentary on the nature of vision itself. Optical conceits and perspectival games formed part of the map's language of vision, were central to its commission, and shaped its display, formal design, and allegorical fabric. These discoveries compel a sweeping revision of the artwork's intellectual and art-historical genealogy, as well as its function and aesthetic significance, shedding new light on the impact of scientific discourses in late medieval art.

  • Folk Costumes of the World

    Folk costumes express both the character of communities and their ethnic origins. This book demonstrates their diversity and ingenuity with examples of the embroidery and weaving of these costumes, which are still being created today.

  • Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry

    A new look at the art of one of the most charming and idiosyncratic personalities of early 20th-century New York

    Florine Stettheimer (1871-1944) was a New York original: a society lady who hosted an avant-garde salon in her Manhattan home, a bohemian and a flapper, a poet, a theater designer, and above all an influential painter with a sharp satirical wit. Stettheimer collaborated with Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson, befriended (and took French lessons from) Marcel Duchamp, and was a member of Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe's artistic and intellectual circle. Beautifully illustrated with 150 color images, including the majority of the artist's extant paintings, as well as drawings, theater designs, and ephemera, this volume also highlights Stettheimer's poetry and gives her a long overdue critical reassessment.

    The essays published here--as well as a roundtable discussion by seven leading contemporary female artists--overturn the traditional perception of Stettheimer as an artist of mere novelties. Her work is linked not only to American modernism and the New York bohemian scene before World War II but also to a range of art practices active today. Flamboyant and epicurean, she was an astute documenter of New York and parodist of her social milieu; her highly decorative scenes borrowed from Surrealism and contributed to the beginnings of a feminist aesthetic.

  • Medieval Europe

    A spirited and thought-provoking history of the vast changes that transformed Europe during the 1,000-year span of the Middle Ages

    The millennium between the breakup of the western Roman Empire and the Reformation was a long and hugely transformative period--one not easily chronicled within the scope of a few hundred pages. Yet distinguished historian Chris Wickham has taken up the challenge in this landmark book, and he succeeds in producing the most riveting account of medieval Europe in a generation.

    Tracking the entire sweep of the Middle Ages across Europe, Wickham focuses on important changes century by century, including such pivotal crises and moments as the fall of the western Roman Empire, Charlemagne's reforms, the feudal revolution, the challenge of heresy, the destruction of the Byzantine Empire, the rebuilding of late medieval states, and the appalling devastation of the Black Death. He provides illuminating vignettes that underscore how shifting social, economic, and political circumstances affected individual lives and international events. Wickham offers both a new conception of Europe's medieval period and a provocative revision of exactly how and why the Middle Ages matter.

  • The Secretary's Software Survival Guide

    For secretaries who are starting out, and for temps, this is a guide to the software packages which you might use at work. The book is divided into five main sections: file management; word-processing; spreadsheets; databases; and presentations packages.

  • A Little History of Religion

    For curious readers young and old, a rich and colorful history of religion from humanity's earliest days to our own contentious times

    In an era of hardening religious attitudes and explosive religious violence, this book offers a welcome antidote. Richard Holloway retells the entire history of religion--from the dawn of religious belief to the twenty-first century--with deepest respect and a keen commitment to accuracy. Writing for those with faith and those without, and especially for young readers, he encourages curiosity and tolerance, accentuates nuance and mystery, and calmly restores a sense of the value of faith.

    Ranging far beyond the major world religions of Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, and Hinduism, Holloway also examines where religious belief comes from, the search for meaning throughout history, today's fascinations with Scientology and creationism, religiously motivated violence, hostilities between religious people and secularists, and more. Holloway proves an empathic yet discerning guide to the enduring significance of faith and its power from ancient times to our own.

  • Advances in Human Genetics

    The latest in the series of literature reviews designed to keep specialists in genetics and related fields abreast of current developments. The five articles cover the lethal osteochondrodysplasias, mutations in type I procollagen genes that cause osteogenesis imperfecta, structural defects in inher

  • Hitler's Monsters: A Supernatural History of the Third Reich

    The definitive history of the supernatural in Nazi Germany, exploring the occult ideas, esoteric sciences, and pagan religions touted by the Third Reich in the service of power

    The Nazi fascination with the occult is legendary, yet today it is often dismissed as Himmler's personal obsession or wildly overstated for its novelty. Preposterous though it was, however, supernatural thinking was inextricable from the Nazi project. The regime enlisted astrology and the paranormal, paganism, Indo-Aryan mythology, witchcraft, miracle weapons, and the lost kingdom of Atlantis in reimagining German politics and society and recasting German science and religion. In this eye-opening history, Eric Kurlander reveals how the Third Reich's relationship to the supernatural was far from straightforward. Even as popular occultism and superstition were intermittently rooted out, suppressed, and outlawed, the Nazis drew upon a wide variety of occult practices and esoteric sciences to gain power, shape propaganda and policy, and pursue their dreams of racial utopia and empire.

  • Cassell Spelling Dictionary

    An easy-to-use spelling guide to over 35,000 words, this book is designed as a companion for anyone who uses words, at home, at school or in the office. It includes technical words, slang words and foreign words, American and other alternative spellings, and guidance notes on spelling rules.

  • The Origins of Everything in 100 Pages (more or less)

    Covering 13.8 billion years in some 100 pages, a calculatedly concise, wryly intelligent history of everything, from the Big Bang to the advent of human civilization

    With wonder, wit, and flair--and in record time and space--geophysicist David Bercovici explains how everything came to be everywhere, from the creation of stars and galaxies to the formation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans, to the origin of life and human civilization. Bercovici marries humor and legitimate scientific intrigue, rocketing readers across nearly fourteen billion years and making connections between the essential theories that give us our current understanding of topics as varied as particle physics, plate tectonics, and photosynthesis. Bercovici's unique literary endeavor is a treasure trove of real, compelling science and fascinating history, providing both science lovers and complete neophytes with an unforgettable introduction to the fields of cosmology, geology, genetics, climate science, human evolution, and more.

  • Astro Noise: A Survival Guide for Living Under Total Surveillance

    A multifaceted response to issues concerning personal privacy and government power by writers, artists, and others

    The filmmaker, artist, and journalist Laura Poitras has explored the themes of mass surveillance, "war on terror," drone program, Guantanamo, and torture in her work for more than ten years. In 2013, Poitras was contacted by Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency subcontractor who leaked classified information about government-sponsored surveillance. Her resulting documentary, Citizenfour, which won an Academy Award for best documentary feature in 2015, is the third film in her post-9/11 film trilogy.

    For this volume, Poitras has invited authors ranging from artists and novelists to technologists and academics to respond to the modern-day state of mass surveillance. Among them are the acclaimed author Dave Eggers, the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, the former Guantanamo Bay detainee Lakhdar Boumediene, the writer and researcher Kate Crawford, and Edward Snowden, to name but a few. Some contributors worked directly with Poitras and the archive of documents leaked by Snowden; others contributed fictional reinterpretations of spycraft. The result is a "how-to" guide for living in a society that collects extraordinary amounts of information on individuals. Questioning the role of surveillance and advocating for collective privacy are central tennets for Poitras, who has long engaged with and supported free-software technologists.

  • William Hogarth: A Complete Catalogue of the Paintings

    William Hogarth (1697-1764) was among the first British-born artists to rise to international recognition and acclaim and to this day he is considered one of the country's most celebrated and innovative masters. His output encompassed engravings, paintings, prints, and editorial cartoons that presaged western sequential art. This comprehensive catalogue of his paintings brings together over twenty years of scholarly research and expertise on the artist, and serves to highlight the remarkable diversity of his accomplishments in this medium. Portraits, history paintings, theater pictures, and genre pieces are lavishly reproduced alongside detailed entries on each painting, including much previously unpublished material relating to his oeuvre. This deeply informed publication affirms Hogarth's legacy and testifies to the artist's enduring reputation.

  • Clinical Behavioral Medicine: Some Concepts and Procedures

    This book is an effort to integrate some clinical observations, theoretical concepts, and promising clinical procedures that relate psychological variables to physiological variables. My primary emphasis is on what psychological and behavioral concepts and procedures are most likely to enable us to influence physiological functions. The book covers ques- tions that have fascinated me and with which I have struggled in daily clinical practice. What types of people are most at risk for physical disor- ders or dysfunctions? Why do some people present psychosocial con- flicts somatically and others behaviorally? What is the placebo effect and how does it work? How do you arrange the conditions to alter maladap- tive belief systems that contribute to psychopathology and patho- physiology? Do beliefs have biological consequences? When I was in private clinical practice, and even today in my medi- cal school clinical practice situation, I set aside one day each week to puzzle over the theoretical questions that my clinical experience gener- ates. Often isolating these underlying theoretical questions provides guidance into the most relevant empirical literature. I have found that this weekly ritual, which I started in private practice many years ago, appears to increase my clinical efficacy or at least makes clinical work more exciting. I find the unexamined clinical practice hard to endure. Kurt Lewin once said, "There is nothing so practical as a good theory.

  • Public Lands Conflict and Resolution: Managing National Forest Disputes

    The United States Forest Service, perhaps more than any other federal agency, has made great strides during the past two decades revolution- izing its public involvement efforts and reshaping its profile through the hiring of professionals in many disciplinary areas long absent in the agency. In fact, to a large extent, the agency has been doing precisely what everyone has been clamoring for it to do: involving the public more in its decisions; hiring more wildlife biologists, recreation specialists, sociologists, planners, and individuals with "people skills"; and, fur- thermore, taking a more comprehensive and long-term view in planning the future of the national forests. The result has been significant-in some ways, monumental-changes in the agency and its land manage- ment practices. There are provisions for public input in almost all as- pects of national forest management today. The profeSSional disciplines represented throughout the agency's ranks are markedly more diverse than they have ever been. Moreover, no stone is left untumed in the agency's current forest-planning effort, undoubtedly the most compre- hensive, interdisciplinary planning effort ever undertaken by a resource agency in the United States. Regardless of the dramatic change that has occurred in the U. S. Forest Service since the early 1970s, the agency is still plagued by con- flicts arising from dissatisfaction th how it is doing business.

  • Fabulous Monsters: Dracula, Alice, Superman, and Other Literary Friends

    An original look at how literary characters can transcend their books to guide our lives, by one of the world's most eminent bibliophiles

    Charmingly written in his signature engaging erudite style, Alberto Manguel examines how literary characters can have changing identities, and can suddenly shift from behind their conventional stories to teach us about the complexities of love, loss, and life.

    In this personal reckoning with his favorite characters, including Jim from Huckleberry Finn, Phoebe from The Catcher in the Rye, Job and Jonah from the Bible, Quasimodo, the Hippogriff, Little Red Riding Hood, Captain Nemo, Hamlet's mother, and Dr. Frankenstein's Monster, the author shares his unique powers as a reader, encouraging us to establish our own unique literary relationships. An intimate introduction and Manguel's own "doodles" complete this delightfully magical book.

  • Implications of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Its Manipulation: Basic Science Aspects

    Understanding the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and recogniz- ing its clinical relevance require a concert of scientific disciplines applied from a view- point of integrative physiology rather than from only molecular or analytical approaches. It is this broad scope that is emphasized in this book. In my opinion, four original contributions define the field as it exists today. The first, a monograph by Broman,1 entitled The Permeability of the Cerebrospinal Vessels in Normal and Pathological Conditions, was the model for many subsequent clinical and 3 experimental studies on BBB pathology. Second, experiments by Davson, summarized in his book entitled Physiology of the Ocular and Cerebrospinal Fluids, indicated that passive entry of nonelectrolytes into brain from blood is governed largely by their lipid 4 solubility. This research supported the original suggestion by Gesell and Hertzman that cerebral membranes have the semipermeability properties of cell membranes. The modem era of the barrier was introduced with the 1965 paper by Crone,2 entitled "Facilitated transfer of glucose from blood to brain tissue. " This paper identified stereospecific, facilitated transport of glucose as part of a system of regulatory barrier properties at a time when only a barrier to passive diffusion had been contemplated. Finally, the 1967 paper by Reese and Kamovsky, 11 entitled "Fine structural localization of a blood-brain barrier to exogenous peroxidase," sited the barrier at the continuous layer of cerebrovascular endothelial cells, which are connected by tight junctions.

  • Electron-Atom and Electron-Molecule Collisions

    The papers collected in this volume have been presented during a workshop on "Electron-Atom and Molecule Collisions" held at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of the University of Bielefeld in May 1980. This workshop, part of a larger program concerned with the "Properties and Reactions of Isolated Molecules and Atoms," focused on the theory and computational techniques for the quanti- tative description of electron scattering phenomena. With the advances which have been made in the accurate quantum mechanical characterisation of bound states of atoms and molecules, the more complicated description of the unbound systems and resonances important in electron collision processes has matured too. As expli- cated in detail in the articles of this volume, the theory for the quantitative explanation of elastic and inelastic electron molecule collisions, of photo- and multiple photon ionization and even for electron impact ionization is well developed in a form which lends itself to a complete quantitative ab initio interpretation and pre- diction of the observable effects. Many of the experiences gained and the techniques which have evolved over the years in the com- putational characterization of bound states have become an essential basis for this development. To be sure, much needs to be done before we have a complete and detailed theoretical understanding of the known collisional processes and of the phenomena and effects, which may still be un- covered with the continuing refinement of the experimental tech- niques.

  • Paul: The Pagans' Apostle

    A groundbreaking new portrait of the apostle Paul, from one of today's leading historians of antiquity

    Often seen as the author of timeless Christian theology, Paul himself heatedly maintained that he lived and worked in history's closing hours. His letters propel his readers into two ancient worlds, one Jewish, one pagan. The first was incandescent with apocalyptic hopes, expecting God through his messiah to fulfill his ancient promises of redemption to Israel. The second teemed with ancient actors, not only human but also divine: angry superhuman forces, jealous demons, and hostile cosmic gods. Both worlds are Paul's, and his convictions about the first shaped his actions in the second.

    Only by situating Paul within this charged social context of gods and humans, pagans and Jews, cities, synagogues, and competing Christ-following assemblies can we begin to understand his mission and message. This original and provocative book offers a dramatically new perspective on one of history's seminal figures.

  • The Land Is Full: Addressing Overpopulation in Israel

    An assessment of how Israel's extraordinary population growth undermines the country's environment, social equity, and quality of life--and what must be done about it

    During the past sixty-eight years, Israel's population has increased from one to eight million people. Such exponential growth has produced acute environmental and social crises in this tiny country. Alon Tal, one of Israel's foremost environmentalists, considers the ramifications of the extraordinary demographic shift, from burgeoning pollution and dwindling natural resources to overburdened infrastructure and overcrowding. Based on extensive fieldwork and interviews, the book examines the origins of Israel's population policies and how they must change to support a sustainable future.

  • Survey of London: South-east Marylebone

    Providing essential knowledge about the British capital's built environment, these two volumes cover a large portion of the parish of St. Marylebone, bounded to the south by Oxford Street and to the north by the Marylebone Road, and stretching from just west of Marylebone High Street to the parish boundary along Cleveland Street near Tottenham Court Road to the east. This area is rich in historic buildings and includes some of London's most celebrated addresses, including Portland Place, Cavendish Square, and Harley Street. Among the most important buildings covered in this superbly illustrated book are Robert and James Adam's development of Portland Place, where the Royal Institute of British Architects' headquarters is a notable 20th-century insertion. Other landmarks include Marylebone Parish Church, All Saints Margaret Street and All Souls Langham Place, and the vast, recently demolished Middlesex Hospital. In addition to new photography, this volume includes meticulous architectural drawings and detailed coverage of the topography.

  • Rachel Harrison - G-L-O-R-I-A

    Linking two influential figures in American art, this fascinating catalogue explores the intersection between works by modern master Robert Rauschenberg (1925--2008) and innovative contemporary artist Rachel Harrison (b. 1966). Taking its name from Gloria, an iconic Rauschenberg work in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, the book covers multiple aspects of Harrison's career thus far, and uses her work as a lens to explore the lasting influence of Rauschenberg. Two essays underline the reason for this pairing: one, by Beau Rutland, takes a thematic approach to the interplay between Rauschenberg's and Harrison's practices; the other, by Johanna Burton, presents a more nuanced look at Harrison's oeuvre. Harrison herself debuts new digital collages created specifically for this publication. The first book to compare Rauschenberg and Harrison, Rachel Harrison: G-L-O-R-I-A brings a completely new perspective to these well-known subjects.

  • Amorphous Solids and the Liquid State

    This book has its origins in the 1982 Spring College held at the Interna- tional Centre for Theoretical Physics, Miramare, Trieste. The primary aim is to give a broad coverage of liquids and amorphous solids, at a level suitable for graduate students and research workers in condensed-matter physics, physical chemistry, and materials science. The book is intended for experimental workers with interests in the basic theory. While the topics covered are many, it was planned to place special emphasis on both static structure and dynamics, including electronic transport. This emphasis is evident from the rather complete coverage of the determination of static structure from both diffraction experiments and, for amorphous solids especially, from model building. The theory of the structure of liquids and liquid mixtures is then dealt with from the standpoint of, first, basic statistical mechanics and, subsequently, pair potentials constructed from the electron theory of simple metals and their alloys. The discussion of static structure is completed in two chapters with rather different emphases on liquid surfaces and interfaces. The first deals with the basic statistical mechanics of neutral and charged interfaces, while the second is concerned with solvation and double-layer effects. Dynamic structure is introduced by a comprehensive discussion of single-particle motion in liquids. This is followed by the structure and dynamics of charged fluids, where again much basic statistical mechanics is developed.

  • Art History and Emergency: Crises in the Visual Arts and Humanities

    Art History and Emergency assesses art history's role and responsibilities in what has been described as the "humanities crisis"--the perceived decline in the practical applications of the humanities in modern times. This timely collection of critical essays and creative pieces addresses several thought-provoking questions on the subject. For instance, as this so-called crisis is but the latest of many, what part has "crisis" played in the humanities' history? How are artists, art historians, and professionals in related disciplines responding to current pressures to prove their worth? How does one defend the practical value of knowing how to think deeply about objects and images without losing the intellectual intensity that characterizes the best work in the discipline? Does art history as we know it have a future?

  • Coal Combustion and Gasification

    The use of coal is required to help satisfy the world's energy needs. Yet coal is a difficult fossil fuel to consume efficiently and cleanly. We believe that its clean and efficient use can be increased through improved technology based on a thorough understanding of fundamental physical and chemical processes that occur during consumption. The principal objective of this book is to provide a current summary of this technology. The past technology for describing and analyzing coal furnaces and combus- tors has relied largely on empirical inputs for the complex flow and chemical reactions that occur while more formally treating the heat-transfer effects. GrOWing concern over control of combustion-generated air pollutants revealed a lack of understanding of the relevant fundamental physical and chemical mechanisms. Recent technical advances in computer speed and storage capacity, and in numerical prediction of recirculating turbulent flows, two-phase flows, and flows with chemical reaction have opened new opportunities for describing and modeling such complex combustion systems in greater detail. We believe that most of the requisite component models to permit a more fundamental description of coal combustion processes are available. At the same time there is worldwide interest in the use of coal, and progress in modeling of coal reaction processes has been steady.

  • By Tank into Normandy

    'One of the best half-dozen personal accounts of the Normandy campaign' - Richard Holmes

    Stuart Hills embarked his Sherman DD tank on to an LCT at 6.45 a.m., Sunday 4 June 1944. He was 20 years old, unblooded, fresh from a public-school background and Officer Cadet training. He was going to war. Two days later, his tank sunk, he and his crew landed from a rubber dinghy with just the clothes they stood in. After that, the struggles through the Normandy bocage in a replacement tank (of the non-swimming variety), engaging the enemy in a constant round of close encounters, led to a swift mastering of the art of tank warfare and remarkable survival in the midst of carnage and destruction. His story of that journey through hell to victory makes for compulsive reading.

  • Network Computers Versus High Performance Computers

    This work sets out to explain the implications of networking technology for the business community. It presents current developments and also looks forward to the 21st century. It addresses the challenges associated with industrial computing, explains the role of the Internet in corporate communications, and predicts the expansion of mobile computing. Terminology and definitions developed at the University of California are introduced and made accessible.

  • Brewer's Theatre: A Phrase and Fable Dictionary

    Both an invaluable reference source and an excellent book for browsers, this dictionary contains a blend of facts and anecdotes that will be of absorbing fascination to anyone with an interest in the theatre and its history. Its scope is impressively wide, with coverage ranging from biographies of writers, performers and directors; to plot summaries of major plays and descriptions of famous first performances; to definitions of theatrical jargon; to articles on the development of the theatre, from ancient Greek times to the present. Attention is also focused on the many aspects of popular and folk drama, and to the different forms that the theatre takes in different parts of the world. With an approach that manages to be both informed and entertaining, this is a book that captures all the variety - and the excitement - of the theatre and its history.

  • The Winchester: The Gun That Built an American Dynasty

    A fascinating history of the family behind the popular firearm that changed America and the world

    Arguably the world's most famous firearm, the Winchester Repeating Rifle was sought after by a cast of characters ranging from the settlers of the American West to the Ottoman Empire's Army. Laura Trevelyan, a descendant of the Winchester family, offers an engrossing personal history of the colorful New England clan responsible for the creation and manufacture of the "Gun that Won the West." Trevelyan chronicles the rise and fortunes of a great American arms dynasty, from Oliver Winchester's involvement with the Volcanic Arms Company in 1855 through the turbulent decades of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She explores the evolution of an iconic, paradigm-changing weapon that has become a part of American culture; a longtime favorite of collectors and gun enthusiasts that has been celebrated in fiction, glorified in Hollywood, and applauded in endorsements from the likes of Annie Oakley, Theodore Roosevelt, Ernest Hemingway, and Native American tribesmen who called it "the spirit gun."

  • Conversations about Sculpture

    "The rhythm of the body moving through space has been the motivating source of most of my work."--Richard Serra

    Drawn from talks between celebrated artist Richard Serra and acclaimed art historian Hal Foster held over a fifteen-year period, this volume offers revelations into Serra's prolific six-decade career and the ideas that have informed his working practice. Conversations about Sculpture is both an intimate look at Serra's life and work, with candid reflections on personal moments of discovery, and a provocative examination of sculptural form from antiquity to today. Serra and Foster explore such subjects as the artist's work in steel mills as a young man; the impact of music, dance, and architecture on his art; the importance of materiality and site specificity to his aesthetic; the controversies and contradictions his work has faced; and his belief in sculpture as experience. They also discuss sources of inspiration--from Donatello and Brancusi to Japanese gardens and Machu Picchu--revealing a history of sculpture across time and culture through the eyes of one of the medium's most brilliant figures.

    Introduced with an insightful preface by Foster, this probing dialogue is beautifully illustrated with duotone images that bring to life both Serra's work and his key commitments.

  • William Ivey Long: Costume Designs 2007-2016

    William Ivey Long (b. 1947) is a leading costume designer for the stage, film, and television, whose creativity, artistry, and craftsmanship have earned him ovations throughout the theater community and beyond. A defining presence on Broadway, he has won six Tony Awards for costume design and a National Arts Award for Fashion. Ivey is unique in the history of costume design, operating at once in the atelier traditions of court costumers of Louis XIV and in the dazzling mode of contemporary Parisian couturiers. His work combines an understanding of art history with bespoke fashion skills to create visual illusion and material reality.

    William Ivey Long tells the story of an American legend through a review of his illustrious career and an analysis of his work; copious illustrations of his sketches, fabric swatches, and costume designs; and discussion of the productions brought to life by his award-winning costumes, including Cinderella, Little Dancer, Grease Live!, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show Let's Do the Time Warp Again.

  • Red Flags: Why Xi's China Is in Jeopardy

    A trusted economic commentator provides a penetrating account of the threats to China's continued economic rise Under President Xi Jinping, China has become a large and confident power both at home and abroad, but the country also faces serious challenges. In this critical take on China's future, economist George Magnus explores four key traps that China must confront and overcome in order to thrive: debt, middle income, the Renminbi, and an aging population. Looking at the political direction President Xi Jinping is taking, Magnus argues that Xi's authoritarian and repressive philosophy is ultimately not compatible with the country's economic aspirations. Thorough and well researched, the book also investigates the potential for conflicts over trade, China's evolving relationship with Trump, and the country's attempt to win influence and control in Eurasia through the Belt and Road initiative.

  • Martha Rosler: Irrespective

    The work of Martha Rosler is perennially incisive, provocative, political, and timely, exploring a range of issues from everyday life and the media to architecture and the built environment, especially as they affect women. Over her prolific career, Rosler has returned to themes of social justice, popular culture, food, gardens and the natural world, and the intersection of aesthetics and ethics. Martha Rosler: Irrespective is the only survey of the artist's vital and enduring work, examining it across media including photocollage, video and film, installation, actions, and books. In addition to a rich array of artworks, this book presents texts by distinguished critics and art historians, and a candid and insightful conversation with the artist. Through her interrogations of the Vietnam War, the War on Terror, feminism, gentrification, and other timely issues, Rosler has persistently bridged art and activism. This important catalogue comes at a moment when work like Rosler's has the power to inspire change.

  • Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables

    A major reevaluation of an iconic 20th-century American artist

    This comprehensive study of Grant Wood (1891-1942) is packed with extensive new scholarship and provides fresh insight into the career of one of the key figures of 20th-century American art. Working primarily in the traditional genres of portraiture and landscape, Wood infused his paintings with a palpable tension that is grounded in the profound epistemological and social upheavals of his time. Exploring Wood's oeuvre from a variety of perspectives, this book presents the artist's work in all of its subtle complexity and eschews the idea that Wood can be categorized simply as a Regionalist painter.

    Generously illustrated, Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables includes several works published here for the first time, as well as new photography of other paintings. The essays in the volume contextualize Wood's work within a much larger art-historical framework than has previously been considered; renowned scholars address topics such as the artist's literary influences, the role of gender identity in his paintings, and the parallels between Wood's work and the contemporaneous European movements of Surrealism, Neue Sachlichkeit, Precisionism, Art Deco design, and the Arts and Crafts movement. Through a careful reconsideration of Wood's career, creative process, technique, iconography, and critical reception, this book reveals for the first time the deep significance and cosmopolitan breadth of Wood's artistic vision.

  • Turner's Modern and Ancient Ports: Passages Through Time

    An engaging look at one of the central motifs in the work of the great 19th-century painter

    Widely considered Britain's greatest painter, Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) is best known for his light-filled landscapes and seascapes. A relentless traveler, Turner often turned his artistic attention to the theme of modern and ancient ports. In the mid-1820s, Turner exhibited two monumental, and controversial, paintings of ports: Cologne and Dieppe. Shocking for their intense luminosity and yellow tonality, as well as for Turner's unorthodox handling of paint, these works marked a transition in the artist's career as he moved away from naturalism and toward a new, poetic topography.

    This in-depth study of these two seminal paintings also addresses a wide selection of Turner's works in both oil and watercolor from the 1820s, placing them in the context of radical changes in British social and economic structures taking place at the time. Drawing from period travel accounts, contemporary critical commentary, and new technical analyses of Turner's work, this magnificently illustrated book brings a fresh, new perspective to the pivotal middle years of Turner's career.

  • Gynecologic Endocrinology

    It has been exactly five years since I was privileged to write the foreword for the previous edition of this distinguished book on gynecologic endocrinology. Reproductive endocrinology has been established as a separate respected area in the general field of endocrinology, as well as in obstetrics and gynecology. Years ago the reproductive endocrinologist took long periods of time to answer questions, since most of the studies done then used bioassay methods. These studies were hastened by the work of Berson and Yalow with their development of the radioimmunoassay. They were later awarded the Nobel Prize for this work, since it unlocked many avenues of investigation in the field of endocrinology. It is now possible to measure small quantities of hormones in various biological tissues. Since that time high-pressure liquid chro- matography and mass spectrometry have unlocked further secrets in this field with their capability of measuring ever smaller quantities of substances as well as their metabolites. Giant strides have been made in other diagnostic methods that interface with gynecologic endocrinology, notably in the field of radiology in the arena of tomography and CAT scans, and now nuclear magnetic resonance. Progress will be pushed still further, and this fourth edition again identifies the leading edge of knowledge. Such new areas embrace the physiology of relaxin, the ontogeny of sexual differentiation, diagnostic procedures on the cervix, functional dysmenorrhea and anorexia nervosa, idiopathic edema, and the misunderstood premenstrual tension syndrome.

  • Francis Picabia Catalogue Raisonne : Volume II (1915-1927)

    The second of an important multi-volume catalogue project, this publication features work by Francis Picabia (1879-1953) that dates from 1915 into mid-1927. Beginning with Picabia's elaboration of a personal machinist aesthetic, the book continues by looking at the artist's central role in the formulation of the Paris Dada movement. That irreverent movement included Picabia's increasingly provocative mechanomorphic compositions, complemented by his unorthodox writings and graphic designs as well as socially powerful performances. In the 1920s, Picabia turned to striking geometrical abstractions, subversive figurative art, and a collaboration in 1924 with the Swedish Ballet. The volume finishes with a look at Picabia's creations of the mid-1920s, which included memorable collages and flamboyant figurative compositions known as the "monsters."

  • Natural Capital: Valuing Our Planet

    Hard-hitting recommendations for what must be done to manage global natural capital and reverse environmental destruction

    Natural capital is what nature provides to us for free. Renewables--like species--keep on coming, provided we do not drive them towards extinction. Non-renewables--like oil and gas--can only be used once. Together, they are the foundation that ensures our survival and well-being, and the basis of all economic activity. In the face of the global, local, and national destruction of biodiversity and ecosystems, economist Dieter Helm here offers a crucial set of strategies for establishing natural capital policy that is balanced, economically sustainable, and politically viable.

    Helm shows why the commonly held view that environmental protection poses obstacles to economic progress is false, and he explains why the environment must be at the very core of economic planning. He presents the first real attempt to calibrate, measure, and value natural capital from an economic perspective and goes on to outline a stable new framework for sustainable growth. Bristling with ideas of immediate global relevance, Helm's book shifts the parameters of current environmental debate. As inspiring as his trailblazing The Carbon Crunch, this volume will be essential reading for anyone concerned with reversing the headlong destruction of our environment.

  • The Reoviridae

    It is now just 20 years since Gomatos and his co-workers at the Rocke- feller University showed that the nucleic acid in reovirus particles is double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). This discovery created great excitement, for dsRNA was at that time under intense investigation as the replicative form of viral genomes consisting of single-stranded RNA. An equally interesting and important finding followed soon after: it was found that the reovirus genome consists, not of a single nucleic acid molecule, but of 10 discrete "segments," each with its specific sequence content and each transcribed into its own messenger RNA. It is clear now that these segments are genes. Not surprisingly, the availability of a viral genome 10 unlinked genes has permitted some unique lines of in- consisting of vestigation in molecular biology. Mammalian and avian reoviruses proved to be but the first of several viruses recognized as sharing Similarity in size and morphology and ge- nomes consisting of 10, II, or 12 separate genes. These viruses are dis- tributed throughout living organisms; among the natural hosts of mem- bers of this virus family are vertebrates, Insects, and plants. Members of the Reoviridae family differ widely in the virulence that they exhibit toward their hosts . . For example, the first discovered mam- malian reovirus literally is, as the name signifies, a "respiratory enteric orphan" virus, that is, a virus unassociated with disease.

  • Mona Hatoum: Terra Infirma

    A fresh and engaging look at the groundbreaking work of contemporary artist Mona Hatoum

    The work of London-based artist Mona Hatoum (b. 1952) addresses the growing unease of an ever-expanding world that is as technologically networked as it is fractured by war and exile. Best known for sculptures that transform domestic objects such as kitchen utensils or cribs into things strange and threatening, Hatoum conducts multilayered investigations of the body, politics, and gender that express a powerful and pervasive sense of precariousness. Her works are never simple and often elicit conflicting emotions, such as fascination and fear, desire and revulsion.

    This copiously illustrated presentation of Hatoum's oeuvre offers critical and art historical essays by Michelle White and Anna C. Chave and imaginative texts by Rebecca Solnit and Adania Shibli, which contextualize the artist's work and its relationship to Surrealism, Minimalism, feminism, and politics. With extensive discussions on a selection of significant sculptures and installations, some of which are previously unpublished, Mona Hatoum: Terra Infirma provides an insightful look at one of the most exciting and influential artists working today.

  • Theory of Multiphoton Processes

    My aim in this book has been to give an account of the theoretical methods of analysis of multiphoton processes in atomic physics. In this account I have emphasized systematic methods as opposed to ad hoc approaches. Both perturbative and nonperturbative methods are presented with il- lustrative results of concrete applications. The perturbation theory is the primary tool of analysis of nonresonant multiphoton processes. It is developed here in conjunction with a diagrammatic language and is also renormalized to free it from the unwanted divergences which accompany the ordinary treatment when higher-order corrections are considered. The nonperturbative methods (i.e., methods other than that of power series ex- pansion in the field strength) become particularly important for consistent treatments of problems involving, for example, intermediate resonances, high field strengths, and finite pulse duration. The specifically nonpertur- bative methods for multiphoton transitions are presented in Chapters 6-11. The methods of resolvent equations and of effective Hamiltonians are developed for both the stationary and the time-dependent fields. The densi- ty matrix method is presented in conjunction with the problems of relaxa- tion and of fluctuating fields. The Floquet theory is presented both in the energy domain and in the time domain. Also treated are the methods of continued fractions, recursive iterative equations, and chain Hamiltonians.

  • Applications of Circularly Polarized Radiation Using Synchrotron and Ordinary Sources

    viii The experimental research presented at the conference and reported here deals mainly with the visible wavelength region and slight extensions to either side (roughly from 150 nrn to 1000 nrn, 8. 3 eV to 1. 2 eV). A single exception was that dealing with a description of spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at energies up to 40 eV (31 nm). This work was done using circularly polarized radiation emitted above and below the plane of the circulating electrons in a synchrotron ring. The device at BESSY (West Germany) in which the experiments were carried out seems to be the only one presently capable of providing circularly polarized radiation in the X--ray through vacuum ultraviolet energy range. A much more intense source is needed in this range. A possible solution was proposed which could provide not only circularly polarized photons over a wide energy range, but could in principle modulate the polarization of the beam between two orthogonal polarization states. Realization of this device, or an equivalent one, would be a vital step towards the goal of determining all components of the Mueller matrix for each spectroscopic experiment. A variety of theoretical treatments are presented describing the different phenomena emerging from the interaction of matter and polarized radiation in a wide range of energies. From this work we expect to learn what are the most useful wavelength regions and what types of samples are the most suitable for study.

  • The Horse in Ancient Greek Art

    A unique illustrated book, focusing on the significance of the horse in ancient Greek culture

    Horses were revered in ancient Greece as symbols of wealth, power, and status. On stunning black- and red-figure vases, in sculpture, and in other media, Greek artists depicted the daily care of horses, chariot and horseback races, scenes of combat, and mythological horse-hybrids such as satyrs and the winged Pegasus.

    This richly illustrated and handsomely designed volume includes over 80 objects showing scenes of ancient equestrian life. Essays by notable scholars of ancient Greek art and archaeology explore the indelible presence and significance horses occupied in numerous facets of ancient Greek culture, including myth, war, sport, and competition, shedding new light on horsemanship from the 8th through the 4th century BCE.

  • The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions

    A thought-provoking reflection on why secular national liberation movements are so often challenged by militant religious revivals

    Many of the successful campaigns for national liberation in the years following World War II were initially based on democratic and secular ideals. Once established, however, the newly independent nations had to deal with entirely unexpected religious fierceness. Michael Walzer, one of America's foremost political thinkers, examines this perplexing trend by studying India, Israel, and Algeria, three nations whose founding principles and institutions have been sharply attacked by three completely different groups of religious revivalists: Hindu militants, ultra-Orthodox Jews and messianic Zionists, and Islamic radicals. In his provocative, well-reasoned discussion, Walzer asks, Why have these secular democratic movements been unable to reproduce their political culture beyond one or two generations? In a postscript, he compares the difficulties of contemporary secularism to the successful establishment of secular politics in the early American republic--thereby making an argument for American exceptionalism but gravely noting that we may be less exceptional today.

  • Mossbauer Spectroscopy Applied to Inorganic Chemistry

    In 1988 the Mossbauer effect community completed 30 years of continual contribution to the fields of nuclear physics, solid state science, and a variety of related disciplines. To celebrate this anniversary, Professor Gonser of the Universitat des Saarlandes has contributed a chapter to this volume on the history of the effect. Although Mossbauer spectroscopy has reached its mature years, the chapters in this volume illustrate that it is still a dynamic field of science with applications to topics ranging from permanent magnets to biologi- cal mineralization. During the discussion of a possible chapter for this volume, a potential author asked, "Do we really need another Mossbauer book?" The editors responded in the affirmative because they believe that a volume of this type offers several advantages. First, it provides the author with an opportunity to write a personal view of the subject, either with or without extensive pedagogic content. Second, there is no artificially imposed restriction on length. In response to the question, "How long should my chapter be?," we have responded that it should be as long as is necessary to clearly present, explain, and evaluate the topic. In this type of book, it is not necessary to condense the topic into two, four, or eight pages as is now so often a requirement for publication in the research literature.

  • Indian Art of the Americas at the Art Institute of Chicago

    A stunning survey of the indigenous art, architecture, and spiritual beliefs of the Americas, from the Precolumbian era to the 20th century

    This landmark publication catalogues the Art Institute of Chicago's outstanding collection of Indian art of the Americas, one of the foremost of its kind in the United States. Showcasing a host of previously unpublished objects dating from the Precolumbian era to the 20th century, the book marks the first time these holdings have been comprehensively documented. Richard Townsend and Elizabeth Pope weave an overarching narrative that ranges from the Midwestern United States to the Yucatan Peninsula to the heart of South America. While exploring artists' myriad economic, historical, linguistic, and social backgrounds, the authors demonstrate that they shared both a deep, underlying cosmological view and the desire to secure their communities' prosperity by affirming connections to the sacred forces of the natural world. The critical essays focus on topics that bridge traditions across North, Central, and South America, including materials, methods of manufacture, the diversity of stylistic features, and the iconography and functions of various objects. Gorgeously illustrated in color with more than 500 vibrant images, this handsome catalogue serves as the definitive survey of an unparalleled collection.

  • Detroit After Dark: Photographs from the Collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts

    An exploration of the tradition of night photography in the city of Detroit by well-known artists from the 1950s until today

    This book is the first to explore photographic representations of Detroit during the hours from dusk until dawn, featuring work by artists including Robert Frank, Leni Sinclair, Steve Shaw, Russ Marshall, and Dave Jordano, among others. The city's streets, architecture, vast industrial complexes, night clubs, and unique subcultures are captured here in otherworldly visions of the nighttime urban landscape from the 1950s to the present day. These images offer a unique interpretation of Detroit, its industry, culture, and turbulent history through the second half of the 20th century and into the 21st. This book also provides context for the work by addressing historically significant artists who have contributed to the genre, including Ilse Bing, Brassai, Andre Kertesz, Berenice Abbott, and others.

  • Cytomegalovirus: Biology and Infection

    Although there are a number of excellent current reviews on one or another aspect of cytomegalovirus, the last comprehensive treatment of this subject was that of Krech et al. (197la). In view of the amazing advances in the virological, epidemiologic, and clinical knowledge of cytomegaloviruses, an up-to-date book is needed. Such a work should cover many areas of expertise and a voluminous technical literature. Each area might have been reviewed and analyzed by workers more expert than myself. However, I have embarked on the entire venture alone in order to attain unity and continuity in this book, characteristics that are not easily achieved in the more popular multiauthored works. I have tried to review the Iiterature and provide a critical summary for each area discussed. To do this, I provide as much of the primary data of the relevant works as needed and not just the qualitative conclusions. Inevitably, the flow of the narrative may be interrupted by dry facts and figures. However, such information is essential to make this a meaningful reference work. But for those not interested in such details, I have provided at what I hope are crucial points critiques and summaries. This book is not an exhaustive review of all the literature. This is probably no Ionger possible or even desirable. By selection, however, one runs the risk of having missed or ignored important papers. I am keenly aware of this, and I wish to apologize for such oversight, if that is possible.

  • Edlis/Neeson Collection: The Art Institute of Chicago

    Marking an important moment in the Art Institute of Chicago's 136-year history, this book documents an exceptional gift to the museum: the Edlis/Neeson Collection, consisting of 44 stellar works of contemporary art. Among the highlights are major paintings by some of the 20th century's best-known artists, including Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol. Also included in the gift are paintings, photographs, and sculptures by icons of contemporary art such as Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, and Cindy Sherman.

    This catalogue places the Edlis/Neeson Collection in direct dialogue with works already in the Art Institute's holdings. An essay by James Rondeau situates the gift in the context of the museum's history and uses it to illustrate the growth and development of Pop Art. Most importantly, this book celebrates a transformative gift that allows the Art Institute to claim the most important collection of modern and contemporary art in any encyclopedic institution in the world.

  • Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

    This volume (Parts A and B) contains the edited papers presented at the annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation held at Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME on July 24-28, 1989. The Review was organized by the Center for Advanced NDE at the Ames Laboratory of the U. S. Department of Energy, in cooperation with the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, USDOE, and the Materials Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The statistics for the 1989 Review of Progress in QNDE include a total of over 460 participants from the U. S. and nine foreign countries who presented some 325 papers. Over the years this conference has grown into one of the largest, most significant gatherings of NDE researchers and engineers in the world. The meeting was divided into 35 sessions, with as many as four sessions running concurrently, and covering all stages of NDE development from basic research investigations to early engineering applications and all methods of inspection science from ultrasonics to x-ray tomography. The Editors have organized the papers in the Proceedings according to topical subject headings, rather than in the original order of presentation. This rearrangement yields a more user-friendly reference work and follows a pattern now familiar to regular attendees of the Review. Some changes in the headings and their subcategories have been introduced to accommodate dynamic evolution of the field, as we observe it.

  • Traditional Buildings of Britain

    The third edition of the leading introduction to traditional buildings contains a completely new chapter that carries forward the story to the Vernacular Revival of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and shows its influence on houses of today.

  • Nutrition, Aging, and the Elderly

    The proportion of the population over 65 years of age is increasing steadily in most industrialized countries. In the United States the proportion of elderly people has risen from four percent in 1900 to 11 % in 1978, and is projected to be 14% by the year 2000. The occurrence of debilitating chronic diseases in the elderly increases with each additional year. These diseases, along with the natural loss of tissue function that occurs throughout adult life, impose a heavy burden on the health care system. Nutri- tion plays an important etiologic role in many of these degenerative changes. Conse- quently, the aging segment of the population presents a challenge to the nutrition scientist, who should be able to recommend optimal intakes of nutrients to minimize the functional losses associated with aging and to optimize the health of those already elderly. This sixth volume in the series Human Nutrition: A Comprehensive Treatise provides a conspectus of the various interactions of nutrition with the aging process and a comprehensive survey of current knowledge of the amounts of individual nutrients needed by the elderly. The volume begins with a general survey of the multifaceted relationship of nutrition to aging, followed by four chapters on how nutrition can affect age-related changes in selected body functions. The next six chapters cover the avail- able evidence regarding the needs of the elderly for dietary energy, protein, calcium, trace elements, vitamins, and fiber.

  • Unpacking My Library: Artists and Their Books

    A captivating tour of the bookshelves of ten leading artists, exploring the intricate connections between reading, artistic practice, and identity

    Taking its inspiration from Walter Benjamin's seminal 1931 essay, the Unpacking My Library series charts a spirited exploration of the reading and book collecting practices of today's leading thinkers. Artists and Their Books showcases the personal libraries of ten important contemporary artists based in the United States (Mark Dion, Theaster Gates, Wangechi Mutu, Ed Ruscha, and Carrie Mae Weems), Canada (Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller), and the United Kingdom (Billy Childish, Tracey Emin, and Martin Parr). Through engaging interviews, the artists discuss the necessity of reading and the meaning of books in their lives and careers.

    This is a book about books, but it even more importantly highlights the role of literature in shaping an artist's self-presentation and persona. Photographs of each artist's bookshelves present an evocative glimpse of personal taste, of well-loved and rare volumes, and of the individual touches that make a bookshelf one's own. The interviews are accompanied by "top ten" reading lists assembled by each artist, an introduction by Jo Steffens, and Marcel Proust's seminal essay "On Reading."

  • Robert Ryman

    A comprehensive study highlighting the interplay of context and meaning in Robert Ryman's work

    This remarkable volume, featuring new photography and original essays by a formidable array of scholars and curators, is the most expansive and thorough investigation of the work of American painter Robert Ryman in over two decades. Arguing that the relationships between his paintings are key to understanding his diverse output, the book offers more faithful reproductions and subtler details of the paintings than have previously been available, and attends closely to the artist's own strategies of display.

    Ryman's paintings are readily identified by their predominantly achromatic surfaces, but his exploration of the values and effects of white was never limited to paint. His experimentations with canvas, board, paper, aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglas have evolved into a material vocabulary as revolutionary as his use of white. The texts featured here reflect on the importance of Ryman's practice to contemporary art: Robert Storr, curator of Ryman's 1993 retrospective, places the painter in historical context while Courtney J. Martin, curator of his 2015-16 exhibition at Dia Chelsea, looks at Ryman's three-dimensional works. Drawings scholar Allegra Pesenti investigates his drawing practice; music historian John Szwed traces the influence of jazz in Ryman's early works; and artist Charles Gaines asks what, in a Ryman, is real.

  • The Old Boys: The Decline and Rise of the Public School

    To many in the United Kingdom, the British public school remains the disliked and mistrusted embodiment of privilege and elitism. They have educated many of the country's top bankers and politicians over the centuries right up to the present, including the present Prime Minister. David Turner's vibrant history of Great Britain's public schools, from the foundation of Winchester College in 1382 to the modern day, offers a fresh reappraisal of the controversial educational system. Turner argues that public schools are, in fact, good for the nation and are presently enjoying their true "Golden Age," countering the long-held belief that these institutions achieved their greatest glory during Great Britain's Victorian Era. Turner's engrossing and enlightening work is rife with colorful stories of schoolboy revolts, eccentric heads, shocking corruption, and financial collapse. His thoughtful appreciation of these learning establishments follows the progression of public schools from their sometimes brutal and inglorious pasts through their present incarnations as vital contributors to the economic, scientific, and political future of the country.

  • Cassell's Dictionary of Slang

    With its unparalleled coverage of English slang of all types (from 18th-century cant to contemporary gay slang), and its uncluttered editorial apparatus, Cassell's Dictionary of Slang was warmly received when its first edition appeared in 1998. 'Brilliant.' said Mark Lawson on BBC2's The Late Review; 'This is a terrific piece of work - learned, entertaining, funny, stimulating' said Jonathan Meades in The Evening Standard. But now the world's best single-volume dictionary of English slang is about to get even better. Jonathon Green has spent the last seven years on a vast project: to research in depth the English slang vocabulary and to hunt down and record written instances of the use of as many slang words as possible. This has entailed trawling through more than 4000 books - plus song lyrics, TV and movie scripts, and many newspapers and magazines - for relevant material. The research has thrown up some fascinating results - not least the revelation that much of the slang lexicon is far older than scholars have been hitherto aware.The full fruits of this research will appear in due course in a vast multi-volume publication; but its first fruits can be seen in Cassell's Dictionary of Slang: 2nd edition (CDS2). Jonathon's research has not only uncovered many thousands of new slang words and expressions (12,000 of which will appear in CDS2), but has also enabled him to make a myriad improvements to the existing dictionary text. Thus, while the core of entries have been kept in place, new research has ensured that many aspects, whether dating, definitions or etymologies, have been notably improved.

  • The Cranks Bible: A Timeless Collection of Vegetarian Recipes

    This is the definitive classic collection of Nadine Abensur?s recipes for Cranks, displaying the exciting breadth of vegetarian cuisine, clearly in tune with today?s modern style of creative and nutritious eating. Features delicious vegetarian recipes for all occasions, centred around key food groups. Also includes enticing ingredient stories and advice on how to buy and get the best from your ingredients.

  • Mathematical Methods in Chemistry and Physics

    Imposingly thick text derived from a one-semester course intended to acquaint advanced undergraduate (and beginning graduate) students with the concepts and methods of linear mathematics. Though physics is referred to in the title, the book is in almost every organizational and notational respect

  • Morality and Citizenship in Education

    The first section of the book compares and contrasts 'declinist' accounts of the current moral predicament with the somewhat more optimistic approach derived from recent sociological analyses. The second section is more directly devoted to the role of schools in educating about values, morality and citizenship. Specific curricular issues such as the values of enterprise and enterprise culture, educating about citizenship, and the ambiguities about the meaning of the term 'spiritual' are dealt with in successive chapters.

  • The Gift of the Gab: How Eloquence Works

    A many-faceted exploration of spoken eloquence: how it works, how it has evolved, and how to tap its remarkable power

    We all know eloquence when we hear it. But what exactly is it? And how might we gain more of it for ourselves? This entertaining and, yes, eloquent book illuminates the power of language from a linguistic point of view and provides fascinating insights into the way we use words. David Crystal, a world-renowned expert on the history and usage of the English language, probes the intricate workings of eloquence. His lively analysis encompasses everyday situations (wedding speeches, business presentations, storytelling) as well as the oratory of great public gatherings.

    Crystal focuses on the here and now of eloquent speaking--from pitch, pace, and prosody to jokes, appropriateness, and how to wield a microphone. He explains what is going on moment by moment and examines each facet of eloquence. He also investigates topics such as the way current technologies help or hinder our verbal powers, the psychological effects of verbal excellence, and why certain places or peoples are thought to be more eloquent than others. In the core analysis of the book, Crystal offers an extended and close dissection of Barack Obama's electrifying "Yes we can" speech of 2008, in which the president demonstrated full mastery of virtually every element of eloquence--from the simple use of parallelism and an awareness of what not to say, to his brilliant conclusion constructed around two powerful words: dreams and answers.

  • The Gardener's Dictionary of Horticultural Terms

    This text, with over 2900 entries and 1200 explanatory diagrams, covers in non-technical language all gardening, horticultural and botanical terms generally encountered in the sphere of gardening.

  • Evolutionary Biology

    Presents detailed discussions on the systematic, ecological, and evolutionary implications of the pollination of terrestrial orchids of Southern Australia and the Mediterranean; variation and diversity in deep-sea echinoids; the molecular evolution of the alcohol dehydrogenase genes in Drosophila;

  • HF Communications: A Systems Approach

    Communications using the high frequency spectrum (2--30 MHz) have experienced a considerable resurgence. In recent years, powerful microcomputers and VLSI technology have greatly enhanced the prospects of overcoming many of the unique problems that formerly afflicted the HF systems designer. The aim of this book, therefore, is to provide a firm foundation for the design, evaluation and operational use of HF communications, with systems issues as the primary perspective.; The approach provides an understanding of the way in which various elements of the system contribute to the overall HF communications link performance.; Mathematics is introduced only where needed to clarify or illustrate key issues. The book will be vital to the professional communications engineer, already familiar with many of the problems but requiring a consolidated systems view of the subject; to the engineering student and research worker as a reference text which demonstrates how modern technology can be used to solve problems posed to the HF user; and to non- specialists and consultants within the communications industry.

  • Pietro Bembo and the Intellectual Pleasures of a Renaissance Writer and Art Collector

    One of the most influential scholars of the Renaissance, Pietro Bembo (1470-1547) gained fame not only for his literary theory and poetry, but for his incredible collection of art and antiquities. Drawing on anecdotes from Bembo's letters and unpublished archival material, Susan Nalezyty analyzes how Bembo's collection functioned as a source of inspiration for artists like Titian and writers like Giovanni della Casa. As visitors to the collection marveled at the quality and variety of the displayed objects, Bembo encouraged investigations into the ways in which contemporary art compared with ancient objects. Often straddling the line between the visual and literary worlds, these critical discussions catalyzed artistic experiments that led to new modes of creative expression. This generously illustrated volume brings Bembo's collection to life and reveals its key role in the development of Renaissance artistic philosophy and historical study of the classical past.

  • Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of Genius

    An accessible survey on a genius artist, published to accompany the 500th anniversary of Bosch's death

    Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450-1516) lived and worked in 's-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands, where he created enigmatic paintings and drawings full of bizarre creatures, phantasmagoric monsters, and terrifying nightmares. He also depicted detailed landscapes and found inspiration in fundamental moral concepts: seduction, sin, and judgment. This beautiful book accompanies a major exhibition on Bosch's work in his native city, and will feature important new research on his 25 known paintings and 20 drawings. The book, divided into six sections, covers the entirety of the artist's career. It discusses in detail Bosch's Pilgrimage of Life, Bosch and the Life of Christ, his role as a draughtsman, his depictions of saints, and his visualization of Judgment Day and the hereafter, among other topics, and is handsomely illustrated by new photography undertaken by the Bosch Research and Conservation Project Team.

  • Azaleas: Their Care and Cultivation

    Both evergreen and deciduous, azaleas make marvellous garden shrubs, providing colour each spring and early summer. Christopher Fairweather is a life-long enthusiast and in this book he shows how to achieve the best results by providing the best conditions.

  • Latest Readings

    An esteemed literary critic shares his final musings on books, his children, and his own impending death. In 2010, Clive James was diagnosed with terminal leukemia. Deciding that 'if you don't know the exact moment when the lights will go out, you might as well read until they do', James moved his library to his house in Cambridge, where he would 'live, read, and perhaps even write'. James is the award-winning author of dozens of works of literary criticism, poetry, and history, and this volume contains his reflections on what may well be his last reading list. A look at some of James's old favorites as well as some of his recent discoveries, this book also offers a revealing look at the author himself, sharing his evocative musings on literature and family, and on living and dying. As thoughtful and erudite as the works of Alberto Manguel, and as moving and inspiring as Randy Pausch's The Last Lecture and Will Schwalbe's The End of Your Life Book Club, this valediction to James's lifelong engagement with the written word is a captivating valentine from one of the great literary minds of our time.

  • Radical Love: Teachings from the Islamic Mystical Tradition

    This stunning collection showcases the love poetry and mystical teachings at the heart of the Islamic tradition in accurate and poetic original translations

    At a time when the association of Islam with violence dominates headlines, this beautiful collection offers us a chance to see a radically different face of the Islamic tradition. It traces a soaring, poetic, popular tradition that celebrates love for both humanity and the Divine as the ultimate path leading humanity back to God.

    Safi brings together for the first time the passages of the Qur'an sought by the Muslim sages, the mystical sayings of the Prophet, and the teachings of the path of "Divine love." Accurately and sensitively translated by leading scholar of Islam Omid Safi, the writings of Jalal al-Din Rumi can now be read alongside passages by Kharaqani, 'Attar, Hafez of Shiraz, Abu Sa'id-e Abi 'l-Khayr, and other key Muslim mystics. For the millions of readers whose lives have been touched by Rumi's poetry, here is a chance to see the Arabic and Persian traditions that produced him.

  • The Human Planet: How We Created the Anthropocene

    A remarkable exploration of the science, history, and politics of the Anthropocene, one of the most important scientific ideas of our time, from two world-renowned experts

    Meteorites, mega-volcanoes, and plate tectonics--the old forces of nature--have transformed Earth for millions of years. They are now joined by a new geological force--humans. Our actions have driven Earth into a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. For the first time in our home planet's 4.5-billion-year history a single species is increasingly dictating Earth's future.

    To some the Anthropocene symbolizes a future of superlative control of our environment. To others it is the height of hubris, the illusion of our mastery over nature. Whatever your view, just below the surface of this odd-sounding scientific word, the Anthropocene, is a heady mix of science, philosophy, and politics linked to our deepest fears and utopian visions.

    Tracing our environmental impacts through time, scientists Simon Lewis and Mark Maslin reveal a new view of human history and a new outlook for the future of humanity in the unstable world we have created.

  • Constitutional Cliffhangers: A Legal Guide for Presidents and Their Enemies

    The United States Constitution's provisions for selecting, replacing, and punishing presidents contain serious weaknesses that could lead to constitutional controversies. In this compelling and fascinating book, Brian Kalt envisions six such controversies, such as the criminal prosecution of a sitting president, a two-term president's attempt to stay in power, the ousting of an allegedly disabled president, and more. None of these things has ever occurred, but in recent years many of them almost have.

    Besides being individually dramatic, these controversies provide an opportunity to think about how constitutional procedures can best be designed, interpreted, and repaired. Also, because the events Kalt describes would all carry enormous political consequences, they shed light on the delicate and complicated balance between law and politics in American government.

  • Along the Lines: Selected Drawings by Saul Steinberg

    A lively book that traverses forty years of drawing and satire by a celebrated cartoonist and postwar artist

    Romanian-born American artist Saul Steinberg (1914-1999) won international acclaim for his inventive, wry representations of the postwar age. His work appeared on the covers and interiors of the New Yorker for nearly six decades, and his drawings, collages, prints, paintings, and sculptures have been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world. With essays by cartoonist Chris Ware and curator Mark Pascale, this lively book traces Steinberg's imagery as it evolved over the full scope of his career, celebrating his refusal to distinguish between high and low art. The 60 works included traverse the realms of Steinberg's world, from the witty black-ink takes on his newly adopted land of 1940s America to the watercolor paintings he made as a mature artist in the late 1980s.

  • New Frontiers in Quantum Electrodynamics and Quantum Optics

    A review of recent progress in the borderline areas of quantumelectrodynamics, quantumoptics, and quantum theory of measurement. The first section begins with a review of quantum optics, followed by contributions on the coherence, interference, and squeezing of light. The second section reviews the

  • Danny Lyon: Message to the Future

    The first comprehensive overview of an influential American photographer and filmmaker whose work is known for its intimacy and social engagement

    Coming of age in the 1960s, the photographer Danny Lyon (b. 1942) distinguished himself with work that emphasized intimate social engagement. In 1962 Lyon traveled to the segregated South to photograph the civil rights movement. Subsequent projects on biker culture, the demolition and redevelopment of lower Manhattan, and the Texas prison system, and more recently on the Occupy movement and the vanishing culture in China's booming Shanxi Province, share Lyon's signature immersive approach and his commitment to social and political issues that concern those on the margins of society. Lyon's photography is paralleled by his work as a filmmaker and a writer.

    Danny Lyon: Message to the Future is the first in-depth examination of this leading figure in American photography and film, and the first publication to present his influential bodies of work in all media in their full context. Lead essayists Julian Cox and Elisabeth Sussman provide an account of Lyon's five-decade career. Alexander Nemerov writes about Lyon's work in Knoxville, Tennessee; Ed Halter assesses the artist's films; Danica Willard Sachs evaluates his photomontages; and Julian Cox interviews Alan Rinzler about his role in publishing Lyon's earliest works. With extensive back matter and illustrations, this publication will be the most comprehensive account of this influential artist's work.

  • Mark Bradford: Pickett’s Charge

    This beautifully illustrated book documents Pickett's Charge, an ambitious and timely project by renowned artist Mark Bradford. Eight new paintings extend nearly four hundred feet to form a 360-degree experience encircling an entire floor of the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. Bradford's monumental installation is inspired by the 1883 cyclorama painted by Paul Philippoteaux to commemorate the Battle of Gettysburg, which has been considered the critical turning point of the Civil War and, consequently, of American history. Elements from Philippoteaux's paintings are among multiple layers of collaged paper that Bradford has scraped through to reveal hidden textures and complexities, and this interplay--between past and present, between the legible and the mysteriously evocative--encourages a reconsideration of history's conventional linear narratives. The catalogue features an interview with the artist by Stephane Aquin and an essay by Evelyn Hankins that situates the site-specific project within a broader art historical context. With lavish images of the paintings and their installation, including two gatefolds, this book records a significant new contribution to socially engaged American art.

  • Molecular Insect Science

    This volume contains the scientific papers and abstracts of posters presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Insect Science held in Tucson, Arizona, October 22-27, 1989. This meeting was organized by the Center for Insect Science at the University of Arizona in response to the growing need for a forum dedicated to the impact of modern biology on insect science. While scientific studies of a few insects, notably Drosophila melanogaster, have always had a central role in the development of biology, it is only recently that tools have become available to extend these studies to other insects, including those having economic and medical importance. The Tucson meeting was evidence of how far we have come in extending modern biological tools to the study of insects. It is also evident from the contents of this book that the study of insects is making an increasingly important contribution to the advancement of biology generally. Given the large impact of insects on human life, such a development has considerable importance for human welfare, and of the welfare of the ecosystem as a whole. It should be noted that several of the participants who presented posters were invited to prepare full length papers to ensure that the book covered the major areas of insect science. The financial support of the National Science Foundation and the Monsanto Corporation is gratefully acknowledged. Thanks are also due to Sharon Richards for her dedicated work on the manuscripts. Henry H.

  • Michel Sittow: Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe

    This handsome book explores the life and work of a little-known, immensely talented early Renaissance painter from Estonia

    This handsome volume is the first in English devoted to Michel Sittow (c. 1469-1525), an artist from Estonia who trained in the tradition of early Netherlandish painting. Sittow worked for many high-profile patrons, including Isabella of Castile in Spain, and specialized in beautiful small devotional works and portraits; the portraits, in particular, are artistically sophisticated paintings that have been characterized as among the finest of their time. Featuring approximately twenty works attributed to Sittow, as well as paintings by his contemporaries, including Hans Memling and Juan de Flandes, this book provides an important opportunity to learn about Sittow's oeuvre and to appreciate it within the cultural context of his homeland as well as the broader milieu of early northern Renaissance art.

  • God's Library: The Archaeology of the Earliest Christian Manuscripts

    In this bold and groundbreaking book, Brent Nongbri provides an up-to-date introduction to the major collections of early Christian manuscripts and demonstrates that much of what we thought we knew about these books and fragments is mistaken. While biblical scholars have expended much effort in their study of the texts contained within the earliest Christian manuscripts, there has been a surprising lack of interest in thinking about these books as material objects with individual, unique histories. We have too often ignored the ways that the antiquities market obscures our knowledge of the origins of these manuscripts.

    Through painstaking archival research and detailed studies of the most important collections of early Christian manuscripts, Nongbri vividly shows that the earliest Christian books are more than just carriers of texts or samples of handwriting. They are three-dimensional archaeological artifacts with fascinating stories to tell, if we're willing to listen.

  • The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age

    The disintegration of Europe's post-Cold War consensus in the face of anti-Semitism, populist nationalism, and territorial aggression

  • Albert Oehlen: Woods Near Oehle: Includes a 45 Record

    This multimedia boxed set presents a sweeping look at work by pioneering German painter Albert Oehlen (b. 1954), one of the most energetic and significant artists working today. Deeply influenced by literature, music, film, and graphic design, Oehlen's paintings are the result of a complex layering of methods, subject matter, and viewpoints. This distinctive set contains a catalogue of the winter 2016--17 exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art as well as an anthology of texts and images edited by Christopher Williams, a poster, and a vinyl record with a new work by composer and musician Michael Wertmuller, reflecting Oehlen's singular approach to art-making and the collaborative nature of this publication.

  • Fiber Optics: Technology and Applications

    This book is an outgrowth of a course given by the author for people in industry, government, and universities wishing to understand the implica- tions of emerging optical fiber technology, and how this technology can be applied to their specific information transport and sensing system needs. The course, in turn, is an outgrowth of 15 exciting years during which the author participated in the research and development, as well as in the application, of fiber technology. The aim of this book is to provide the reader with a working knowledge of the components and subsystems which make up fiber systems and of a wide variety of implemented and proposed applications for fiber technology. The book is directed primarily at those who would be users, as opposed to developers, of the technology. The first half of this book is an overview of components and subsys- tems including fibers, connectors, cables, sources, detectors, receivers, transmitters, and miscellaneous components. The goal is to familiarize the reader with the properties of these components and subsystems to the extent necessary to understand their potential applications and limitations.

  • Essentials of Production and Operations Management

    This new edition deals with problems likely to be encountered in establishing, designing, planning, running and maintaining production or operating systems. New material includes information on operations policy, cost control and project management and end-of-chapter questions and exercises. The text complements "Production and Operations Management" which was written by the same author.

  • The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan

    A reappraisal of the tumultuous Partition and how it ignited long-standing animosities between India and Pakistan

    This new edition of Yasmin Khan's reappraisal of the tumultuous India-Pakistan Partition features an introduction reflecting on the latest research and on ways in which commemoration of the Partition has changed, and considers the Partition in light of the current refugee crisis.

    Reviews of the first edition:

    "A riveting book on this terrible story."--Economist

    "Unsparing. . . . Provocative and painful."--Times (London)

    "Many histories of Partition focus solely on the elite policy makers. Yasmin Khan's empathetic account gives a great insight into the hopes, dreams, and fears of the millions affected by it."--Owen Bennett Jones, BBC

  • Drawing: The Bottom Line

    Drawing. The Bottom Line presents the works of fifty-three artists from around the globe, all working within the medium of drawing and exploiting its versatile nature in a wide variety of ways. From brief sketches to fully realized and complex constructions, drawing provides the preliminary foundation for all of these works, whether they are simply functional process materials or products of careful consideration. This extensive survey features works from a wide range of prominent contemporary art figures, including Francis Alÿs, Paul McCarthy, Tacita Dean, Roni Horn, Gabriel Orozco, Raymond Pettibon, and many others, as well as written contributions and short introductory texts from dozens of renowned critical voices, many of which have been selected by the artists themselves. Furthermore, the volume contains a previously published essay by influential British writer John Berger. While drawing is often thought of as an incomplete or loosely defined form, this unique anthology and the varying practices of its participants help to demonstrate drawing's extraordinarily distinctive properties and nearly infinite possibilities, affirming its significance as an artistic language.

  • Aleksandr Zhitomirsky: Photomontage as a Weapon of World War II and the Cold War

    The first comprehensive study in English of the Soviet propaganda artist Aleksandr Zhitomirsky, who conceived and deployed his striking photomontages as a political weapon

    The leading Russian propaganda artist Aleksandr Zhitomirsky (1907-1993) made photomontages that were airdropped on German troops during World War II. He later worked for Pravda and other leading publications, satirizing American politics and finance from the Truman through the Reagan eras and educating his public about Egypt, South Africa, Vietnam, and Nicaragua as well. Zhitomirsky favored the grotesque and the eye-catching. His villainous menagerie included Reichsminister Joseph Goebbels as a distorted simian and an airborne scorpion outfitted with an Uncle Sam hat.

    In this comprehensive, image-driven account of Zhitomirsky's long career, Erika Wolf explores his connections to and long friendship with the German artist John Heartfield, whose work inspired his own. Wolf also examines more than 100 of Zhitomirsky's photomontages and translates excerpts from his one published book, The Art of Political Photomontage: Advice for the Artist (1983). In an era when satirical photomontage thrives on the Internet and propaganda has reasserted itself in America and Russia alike, this study of a once-prominent yet internationally undiscovered artist is more than timely.

  • Neuropsychology, Neuropsychiatry, and Behavioral Neurology

    This book is written for the clinician, students, and practitioners of neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry, and behavioral neurology. It has been my intent throughout to present a synthesis of ideas and research findings. I have reviewed thousands of articles and research reports and have drawn extensively from diverse sources in philosophy, psychol- ogy, neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychiatry, physiology, and neuroanatomy in order to produce this text. Of course I have also drawn from my own experience as a clinician and research scientist in preparing this work and in this regard some of my own biases and interests are represented. I have long sought to understand the human mind and the phenomena we experience as conscious awareness. After many years of studying a variety of Western and Eastern psychologists and philosophers, including the Buddhist, Taoist, and Hindu philosophical systems, I began, while still an undergraduate student, to formulate my own theory of the mind. I felt, though, that what I had come upon were only pieces of half the puzzle. What I knew of the brain was minimal. Indeed, it came as quite a surprise when one day I came across the journal Brain as I was browsing through the periodicals section of the library. I was awed. An entire journal devoted to the brain was quite a revelation. Nevertheless, although intrigued by the possibilities, I resisted.

  • Contingent Beauty - Contemporary Art from Latin America

    Exploring cutting-edge techniques and daring themes, many Latin American artists seamlessly intertwine aesthetic refinement with biting critiques of social and political issues. Contingent Beauty assembles major works by more than 20 such artists who have made significant contributions to the global art scene over the past 30 years. Encompassing a variety of media--including painting, drawing, sculpture, and video--the majority of these innovative works are culled from the holdings of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, which possesses an exceptional collection of contemporary Latin American art.

    These objects, while formally sophisticated and alluring, are not ends unto themselves but rather tools intended to heighten viewers' awareness of critical factors that shape the lives of these artists, such as poverty, gender, political repression, the war on drugs, and globalization. In some instances, the "beauty" of these works is contingent upon cultural interpretation. Tensions between beauty and violence, seduction and repulsion, elegance and brutality contribute to the enduring impact of this art and provide a revelatory experience for readers.

  • Dictionary of Semiotics

    A much-needed guide to the terms and models used in the semiotic approach. Over the past few decades, semiotics has increasingly gained in popularity and yet, to many, the very term remains an enigma. But, until now, there has never been a dictionary that

  • Minds Make Societies: How Cognition Explains the World Humans Create

    A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies

    "There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature." Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer in this uniquely innovative book.

    Integrating recent insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and other fields, Boyer offers precise models of why humans engage in social behaviors such as forming families, tribes, and nations, or creating gender roles. In fascinating, thought-provoking passages, he explores questions such as, Why is there conflict between groups? Why do people believe low-value information such as rumors? Why are there religions? What is social justice? What explains morality? Boyer provides a new picture of cultural transmission that draws on the pragmatics of human communication, the constructive nature of memory in human brains, and human motivation for group formation and cooperation.

  • Transforming Supervision in Health Care

    Covers all aspects of the training and development of effective supervisors in health care organizations. Based on real life experiences, the structure of the book follows the development programme created by the author. It ranges from initial identification of the need to improve the quality of supervision, through the design of training, selection of participants, to the delivery and evaluation of training.

  • Gluck: Art and Identity

    Hannah Gluckstein (who called herself Gluck; 1895-1976) was a distinctive, original voice in the early evolution of modern art in Britain. This handsome book presents a major reassessment of Gluck's life and work, examining, among other things, the artist's numerous personal relationships and contemporary notions of gender and social history. Gluck's paintings comprise a full range of artistic genres--still life, landscape, portraiture--as well as images of popular entertainers. Financially independent and somewhat freed from social convention, Gluck highlighted her sexual identity, cutting her hair short and dressing as a man, and the artist is known for a powerful series of self-portraits that played with conventions of masculinity and femininity. Richly illustrated, this volume is a timely and significant contribution to gender studies and to the understanding of a complex and important modern painter.

  • Cottages Ornés: The Charms of the Simple Life

    Tracing the history of cottages ornes (ornamental cottages), this copiously illustrated volume offers an engaging survey of an often-overlooked architectural genre. An invention of mid-18th-century England, these cottages were designed to facilitate a more informal way of living and were built in different guises that range from royal and imperial cottages to the working-class lodges that still dot the English countryside. Analyzing cottage designs by some of the leading architects of late-Georgian England--including Robert Adam, John Soane, and John Nash--Roger White explores the aesthetic values that made the form so appealing. As he follows the development of cottages ornes from the Celtic fringes to the Continent and the British colonies, White reveals the significant impact of the genre on social, cultural, and political history and examines the influence of cottage design on the architectural developments of the Victorian period and even the 20th century.

  • Recent Developments in Alcoholism: Treatment Research

    From the President of the Research Society on Alcoholism In the last decade research concerning the causes and consequences of alcohol abuse and alcoholism has come of age. We have witnessed a plethora of sci- entific findings that have shed light on some of the actions of alcohol at the molecular level. Interesting new data have been forthcoming on the complexi- ties of the development of tolerance to alcohol. It is becoming increasingly appropriate to consider that tolerance to alcohol involves biological as well as psychological factors. New scientific insights have been gained concerning the treatment of with- drawal as well as the presence of persistent withdrawal signs that may possibly be involved with relapse. More recently, new and compelling data indicating that alcoholism is a common familial disorder have appeared. Clinical studies indicate that alcoholism is a heterogeneous disorder with multiformity in clin- ical symptomatology and genetic heterogeneity. The heterogeneity of the clin- ical features and the heritability of the predisposing factors of alcoholism are currently under vigorous scientific investigation. In the past several years sophisticated psychosocial studies have provided fundamental information on subjects at high risk for alcoholism. Psychosocial and biological studies of families including alcoholics and subjects at high risk are likely to bring new insights to our understanding of etiological factors. Moreover, as a result of these studies we stand to develop better prevention initiatives and treatment approaches.

  • Digital Phase Modulation

    The last ten years have seen a great flowering of the theory of digital data modulation. This book is a treatise on digital modulation theory, with an emphasis on these more recent innovations. It has its origins in a collabor- ation among the authors that began in 1977. At that time it seemed odd to us that the subjects of error-correcting codes and data modulation were so separated; it seemed also that not enough understanding underlay the mostly ad hoc approaches to data transmission. A great many others were intrigued, too, and the result was a large body of new work that makes up most of this book. Now the older disciplines of detection theory and coding theory have been generalized and applied to the point where it is hard to tell where these end and the theories of signal design and modulation begin. Despite our emphasis on the events of the last ten years, we have included all the traditional topics of digital phase modulation. Signal space concepts are developed, as are simple phase-shift-keyed and pulse-shaped modulations; receiver structures are discussed, from the simple linear receiver to the Viterbi algorithm; the effects of channel filtering and of hardlimiting are described. The volume thus serves well as a pedagogical book for research engineers in industry and second-year graduate students in communications engineering. The production of a manageable book required that many topics be left out.

  • Principles of Analytical Electron Microscopy

    Since the publication in 1979 of Introduction to Analytical Electron Microscopy (ed. J. J. Hren, J. I. Goldstein, and D. C. Joy; Plenum Press), analytical electron microscopy has continued to evolve and mature both as a topic for fundamental scientific investigation and as a tool for inorganic and organic materials characterization. Significant strides have been made in our understanding of image formation, electron diffraction, and beam/specimen interactions, both in terms of the "physics of the processes" and their practical implementation in modern instruments. It is the intent of the editors and authors of the current text, Principles of Analytical Electron Microscopy, to bring together, in one concise and readily accessible volume, these recent advances in the subject. The text begins with a thorough discussion of fundamentals to lay a foundation for today's state-of-the-art microscopy. All currently important areas in analytical electron microscopy-including electron optics, electron beam/specimen interactions, image formation, x-ray microanalysis, energy-loss spectroscopy, electron diffraction and specimen effects-have been given thorough attention. To increase the utility of the volume to a broader cross section of the scientific community, the book's approach is, in general, more descriptive than mathematical. In some areas, however, mathematical concepts are dealt with in depth, increasing the appeal to those seeking a more rigorous treatment of the subject.

  • Genetic Manipulation of Woody Plants

    This Volume contains the papers presented by twenty-eight invited speakers at the symposium entitled, "Genetic Manipulation of Woody Plants," held at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, from June 21-25, 1987. Also included are abstracts of contributed poster papers presented during the meeting. That the molecular biology of woody plants is a rapidly expanding field is attested to by the large attendance and high level of enthusiasm generated at the conference. Leading scientists from throughout the world discussed challenging problems and presented new insights into the devel- opment of in vitro culture systems, techniques for DNA analysis and manipulation, gene vector systems, and experimental systems that will lead to a clearer understanding of gene expression and regulation for woody plant species. The presence at the conference of both invited speakers and other scientists who work with nonwoody plant species also added depth to the discussions and applicability of the information presented at the conference. The editors want to commend the speakers for their well-organized and informative talks, and feel particularly indebted to the late Dr. Alexander Hollaender and others on the planning committee who assist- ed in the selection of the invited speakers. The committee consisted of David Burger (University of California, Davis), Don J. Durzan (University of California, Davis), Bruce Haissig (U. S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service), Stanley Krugman (U. S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service), Ralph Mott (North Carolina State University), Otto Schwarz (Univer.sity of Tennessee, Knoxville), and Roger Timmis (Weyerhaeuser Company).

  • The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s

    An exhilarating look at Art Deco design in 1920s America, using jazz as its unifying metaphor

    Capturing the dynamic pulse of the era's jazz music, this lavishly illustrated publication explores American taste and style during the golden age of the 1920s. Following the destructive years of the First World War, this flourishing decade marked a rebirth of aesthetic innovation that was cultivated to a great extent by American talent and patronage. Due to an influx of European emigres to the United States, as well as American enthusiasm for traveling to Europe's cultural capitals, a reciprocal wave of experimental attitudes began traveling back and forth across the Atlantic, forming a creative vocabulary that mirrored the ecstatic spirit of the times.

    The Jazz Age showcases developments in design, art, architecture, and technology during the '20s and early '30s, and places new emphasis on the United States as a vital part of the emerging marketplace for Art Deco luxury goods. Featuring hundreds of full-color illustrations and essays by two leading historians of decorative arts, this comprehensive catalogue shows how America and the rest of the world worked to establish a new visual representation of modernity.

  • Design, Form, and Chaos

    "To have the preeminent graphic designer in America--the leading proponent of the Modern--intelligently and forcefully speak out makes this a document for today and the ages. Rand's book is a classic." --Stephen Heller (1993)

    Paul Rand (1914-1996) was a pioneer in the field of advertising design and typography, and his work still exerts a profound influence on the design profession. First published to critical acclaim in 1993, and long unavailable, Design, Form, and Chaos is now back in print. Exploring graphic design challenges such as the values behind aesthetics, the role of intuition, selecting a typeface, and the place of market research, the book elegantly demonstrates how utility and beauty can be effectively combined. Illustrated with examples of Rand's own remarkable graphic design, as well as with the work of artists he admired, the book features seven portfolios that he used to present logos to clients such as Next, IDEO, and IBM. Clearly one of the most important books in the history of 20th-century American design, Design, Form, and Chaos is a must have for any student or professional.

  • On Display - Henrietta Maria and the Materials of Magnificence

    In the early modern period, rulers demonstrated their power and influence through carefully curated 'display' - their presence in court ceremonies, their palaces and their contents, and their portraits. Henrietta Maria of France (1609-1669), queen consort of King Charles I of England, embraced these opportunities for display with particular flair. This richly illustrated book follows Henrietta Maria through and beyond the Bourbon and Stuart courts to chart her patronage and engagement with the visual arts, building works, and the luxury trade. It develops a powerful picture not just of the images, fashions, interiors, and buildings shaped by the queen's directorial influence but also of the political and religious factors that governed her choices and policies of court display. Her cultural patronage in particular emphasized her family honor, dynastic clout, Catholic piety, feminine virtue, and discerning taste.Erin Griffey analyzes the full spectacle of the queen's represented image, not only through the well-known portraits by Sir Anthony van Dyck but also through her rich bed ensembles, tapestries, jewelry, clothing, and devotional goods-the objects that embodied and conveyed her royal power.

  • The Mind Is Flat: The Remarkable Shallowness of the Improvising Brain

    In a radical reinterpretation of how the mind works, an eminent behavioral scientist reveals the illusion of mental depth

    Psychologists and neuroscientists struggle with how best to interpret human motivation and decision making. The assumption is that below a mental "surface" of conscious awareness lies a deep and complex set of inner beliefs, values, and desires that govern our thoughts, ideas, and actions, and that to know this depth is to know ourselves.

    In this profoundly original book, behavioral scientist Nick Chater contends just the opposite: rather than being the plaything of unconscious currents, the brain generates behaviors in the moment based entirely on our past experiences. Engaging the reader with eye-opening experiments and visual examples, the author first demolishes our intuitive sense of how our mind works, then argues for a positive interpretation of the brain as a ceaseless and creative improviser.

    Nick Chater is professor of behavioral science at the Warwick Business School and cofounder of Decision Technology Ltd. He has contributed to more than two hundred articles and book chapters and is author, coauthor, or coeditor of fourteen books.

  • Multi-Valued Fields

    For more than 30 years, the author has studied the model-theoretic aspects of the theory of valued fields and multi-valued fields. Many of the key results included in this book were obtained by the author whilst preparing the manuscript. Thus the unique overview of the theory, as developed in the book, has been previously unavailable.
    The book deals with the theory of valued fields and mutli-valued fields. The theory of Prufer rings is discussed from the `geometric' point of view. The author shows that by introducing the Zariski topology on families of valuation rings, it is possible to distinguish two important subfamilies of Prufer rings that correspond to Boolean and near Boolean families of valuation rings. Also, algebraic and model-theoretic properties of multi-valued fields with near Boolean families of valuation rings satisfying the local-global principle are studied. It is important that this principle is elementary, i.e., it can be expressed in the language of predicate calculus. The most important results obtained in the book include a criterion for the elementarity of an embedding of a multi-valued field and a criterion for the elementary equivalence for multi-valued fields from the class defined by the additional natural elementary conditions (absolute unramification, maximality and almost continuity of local elementary properties). The book concludes with a brief chapter discussing the bibliographic references available on the material presented, and a short history of the major developments within the field.

  • Quality Management in Hospitality: Best Practice in Action

    This study consists of a series of case histories researched at senior levels of organizations. These case histories map the progress which the hospitality industry is making in the field of quality management. The book aims to combine a sound theoretical foundation with examples in current industry practice. Illustrating good practice in quality management in hospitality and tourism organizations, it is based on research sponsored by the National Economic Development Office. It includes a broad range of case studies, including examples from the leisure and tourism industries.

  • The Arcades: Contemporary Art and Walter Benjamin

    The Arcades Project (1927-40), the monumental unfinished work of cultural criticism by Walter Benjamin, is the German philosopher's effort to comprehend urban modernity through the 19th-century Parisian shopping arcade. The Arcades: Contemporary Art and Walter Benjamin combines artworks with archival materials and poetic interventions to form an original, multifaceted response to this collagelike cultural text. Jens Hoffmann astutely pairs works by thirty-six well-known and emerging artists, including Lee Friedlander, Andreas Gursky, Pierre Huyghe, and Cindy Sherman, with the thirty-six "Convolutes," or themes, in Benjamin's text. Bound into the main volume is a graphic novelette, from the imagination of Vito Manolo Roma, of Benjamin's dream the night before he committed suicide while fleeing the Nazis. Scholarly essays by Hoffmann and Caroline A. Jones, texts selected by the poet Kenneth Goldsmith, reproductions of Benjamin's handwritten notes, and a list of the main Paris arcades discussed by him round out this extraordinary publication.

  • Analytical Microbiology Methods: Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    The First International Symposium on the Interface between Analytical Chemistry and Microbiology: Applications of Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry was held June 1987 at the University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, U.S.A. The purpose of the "Interface" meeting was to forge connections between analytical chemists and microbiologists that are using chromatography and mass spectrometry to solve common problems. The goals were admirably fulfilled. Nearly a hundred participants from seven European countries, Japan, and the United States participated in hearing twenty-three plenary talks and thirty-six submitted papers and posters. The papers and discussions displayed the breadth and depth of current research applications and revealed future directions. This book "Analytical Microbiology Methods: Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry" is loosely based on some of the presentations and discussions at the meeting. Each chapter describes specific methodology and applications in the context of the relevant scientific background. The present book continues the theme of an earlier book, "Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Applications in Microbiology", edited by G. Odham, L. Larsson, and P-A. Mardh, published by Plenum Press in 1984.

  • Alexander McQueen: Unseen

    Never-before-seen photos of McQueen's brilliantly creative world from an exclusive backstage photographer

    Alexander McQueen, the iconic designer whose untimely death in 2010 left the fashion world reeling and fans worldwide clamoring for more, fused immense creativity, audacity, and a hauntingly dark aesthetic sense into powerful, unforgettable imagery. The strange, singular beauty of his clothing was matched by the spectacle of his legendary fashion shows, which demonstrated his outstanding showmanship and consistently pushed the boundaries of runway events. Robert Fairer's intimate, vibrant full-color photographs of McQueen's collections, taken backstage and on the catwalk when few photographers were allowed access, offer a unique insight into the life and work of one of the world's most captivating figures.

    This previously unpublished portfolio of stunning, high-energy photographs captures the people and the spirit that made the designer's flamboyant shows unique. Fairer, Vogue's backstage fashion photographer for over a decade, was an integral part of the whirl of activity behind the scenes. These images, which capture both the glamor and the grit, represent a new genre of fashion photography and are a treasure-trove of inspiration. This superb book contains an introduction and collections texts by fashion expert Claire Wilcox. Dynamic images of McQueen's collections--thirty of his total of thirty-six shows are presented chronologically--portray behind-the-scenes moments that reveal stylists, models, hairdressers, makeup artists, and McQueen himself at their most candid and creative.

  • Ionic Channels in Cells and Model Systems

    This book is based on a series of lectures for a course on ionic channels held in Santiago, Chile, on November 17-20, 1984. It is intended as a tutorial guide on the properties, function, modulation, and reconstitution of ionic channels, and it should be accessible to graduate students taking their first steps in this field. In the presentation there has been a deliberate emphasis on the spe- cific methodologies used toward the understanding of the workings and function of channels. Thus, in the first section, we learn to "read" single- channel records: how to interpret them in the theoretical frame of kinetic models, which information can be extracted from gating currents in re- lation to the closing and opening processes, and how ion transport through an open channel can be explained in terms of fluctuating energy barriers. The importance of assessing unequivocally the origin and purity of mem- brane preparations and the use of membrane vesicles and optical tech- niques in the stUGY of ionic channels are also discussed in this section. The patch-clamp technique has made it possible to study ion channels in a variety of different cells and tissues not amenable to more conven- tional electrophysiological methods. The second section, therefore, deals with the use of this technique in the characterization of ionic channels in different types of cells, ranging from plant protoplasts to photoreceptors.

  • Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology: Simulators for Nuclear Power

    This volume represents the second of our occasional departures from the format of an annual review series, being devoted to one coherent topic. We have the pleasure therefore in presenting a concerted sequence of articles on the use of Simulators for Nuclear Power. An essential attribute of a quantified engineer in any discipline is to be able to model and predict, i.e. to analyze, the behaviour of the subject under scrutiny. Simulation goes, one would argue, a step further. The engineer providing a simulator takes a broader view of the system studied and makes the analysis available to a wider audience. Hence simulation may have a part to play in design but also in operation, in accident studies and also in training. It leads to synthesis as well as analysis. There is no doubt that the massive scale and the economic investment implied in nuclear power programmes demands an increased infra-structure in licensing and training as well as in design and operation. The simulator is a cheap alter- native - admittedly cheap only in relative terms - but also perhaps an essential method of providing realistic experience with negligible or at least small risk. Nuclear power therefore has led to a wide range of simulators. At the same time we would not overlook the sub- stantial role played by simulators in say the aero-industry; indeed the ergonomic and psychological studies associated with that industry hold many lessons.

  • In the Shadow of the Moon: The Science, Magic, and Mystery of Solar Eclipses

    In anticipation of solar eclipses visible in 2017 and 2024, an exploration of the scientific and cultural significance of this mesmerizing cosmic display

    Since the first humans looked up and saw the sun swallowed by darkness, our species has been captivated by solar eclipses. Astronomer and anthropologist Anthony Aveni explains the history and culture surrounding solar eclipses, from prehistoric Stonehenge to Babylonian creation myths, to a confirmation of Einstein's theory of general relativity, to a spectacle that left New Yorkers in the moon's shadow, to future eclipses that will capture human imaginations.

    In one accessible and engaging read, Aveni explains the science behind the phenomenon, tracks eclipses across the ancient world, and examines the roles of solar eclipses in modern times to reveal the profound effects these cosmic events have had on human history. Colored by his own experiences--Aveni has witnessed eight total solar eclipses in his lifetime--his account of astronomy's most storied phenomenon will enthrall anyone who has looked up at the sky with wonder.

  • No-Trump Bidding

    The aim of this book is to describe a complete and coherent method of partnership bidding after the opening bidder has announced a balanced hand. Balanced hands are more common than unbalanced hands, so it is important to be able to describe them accurately and efficiently - to show their precise strength and distribution. The scheme proposed here is independent of your bidding system, and so it can be adopted whether you play a natural system such as Acol or Standard American, or a Strong Club system or something more exotic.

  • Children - The Human Clay

    In Children, more than 300 photographs are presented in two sections. The first features images of children that the artist has known: being bathed or fed, laughing or crying with family members, posing with pets or mugging for the camera. The second section presents works from Friedlander's years of photographing people on the street: children in parades, sitting in cars, reflected in storefront windows. Taken together, these images offer a picture of America's youth through the eyes of one of the most renowned photographers of his generation.

  • Modernism and Memory: Rhoda Pritzker and the Art of Collecting

    This book is a glorious celebration of Rhoda Pritzker's collection of 20th-century British art, much of which has been donated to the Yale Center for British Art. Pritzker, who was born in Manchester in1914 and emigrated to the United States during the Blitz, was an avid and daring collector of paintings, sculptures, and drawings. Keen to support artists whose reputations were still emerging, and loyal to no single school or style, she developed a unique and impressively diverse collection. While Pritzker most actively purchased pieces in the 1950s and 1960s, her collection offers a fascinating window onto postwar artistic production. Beautifully illustrated, this catalogue features a number of unpublished works and archival materials. Among the artists discussed are key figures, including L. S. Lowry, Barbara Hepworth, Anthony Caro, and Henry Moore, as well as lesser-known artists. The texts elucidate the factors that made Pritzker's method of collecting so singular--namely her relationship to an evolving transatlantic artistic community and the deeply personal nature of the works she procured.

  • Cassell Dictionary of Cynical Quotations

    Contains thousands of wryly amusing quotations on every conceivable aspect of life, arranged thematically. Some of the people who are quoted are: Aesop, Simone de Beauvoir, Noel Coward, Bette Davis and Albert Einstein.

  • Family and Hiv Today

    Aids is not solely a medical issue but also has profound implications for social and family relationships. Traditionally when a person is ill, the family is seen to provide emotional, practical and social support. Experience has shown, however, that Aids disrupts this conventional pattern of support. On the one hand Aids, like any other serious illness, affects family members both from day to day and in the long term. What distinguishes Aids from so many other illnesses is the associated social stigma and the fact that Hiv may be transmissible, or may have been transmitted, within a relationship. Most psychological and social research has concentrated on the impact of Aids on individuals. Only recently has attention turned to the effect of Aids on the family. This is the first book to address Aids in the family and draws on the work of experienced researchers and practitioners from around the world. It is most fitting that the book should first be published in 1994, the United Nations International Year of the Family. Recognizing the role of the family may mark a change in emphasis in future social research and policy in relation to Hiv and Aids.

  • The Republic of Letters

    A provocative exploration of intellectual exchange across four centuries of European history by the author of When the World Spoke French

    In this fascinating study, preeminent historian Marc Fumaroli reveals how an imagined "republic" of ideas and interchange fostered the Italian Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. He follows exchanges among Petrarch, Erasmus, Descartes, Montaigne, and others from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries, through revolutions in culture and society. Via revealing portraits and analysis, Fumaroli traces intellectual currents engaged with the core question of how to live a moral life--and argues that these men of letters provide an example of the exchange of knowledge and ideas that is worthy of emulation in our own time. Combining scholarship, wit, and reverence, this thought-provoking volume represents the culmination of a lifetime of scholarship.

  • Becoming Freud: The Making of a Psychoanalyst

    From one of the world's foremost authorities on Sigmund Freud comes a strikingly original biography of the father of psychoanalysis

    Becoming Freud is the story of the young Freud--Freud up until the age of fifty--that incorporates all of Freud's many misgivings about the art of biography. Freud invented a psychological treatment that involved the telling and revising of life stories, but he was himself skeptical of the writing of such stories. In this biography, Adam Phillips, whom the New Yorker calls "Britain's foremost psychoanalytical writer," emphasizes the largely and inevitably undocumented story of Freud's earliest years as the oldest--and favored--son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe and suggests that the psychoanalysis Freud invented was, among many other things, a psychology of the immigrant--increasingly, of course, everybody's status in the modern world.

    Psychoanalysis was also Freud's way of coming to terms with the fate of the Jews in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. So as well as incorporating the writings of Freud and his contemporaries, Becoming Freud also uses the work of historians of the Jews in Europe in this significant period in their lives, a period of unprecedented political freedom and mounting persecution. Phillips concludes by speculating what psychoanalysis might have become if Freud had died in 1906, before the emergence of a psychoanalytic movement over which he had to preside.

  • The Craving Mind: From Cigarettes to Smartphones to Love – Why We Get Hooked and How We Can Break Bad Habits

    A leading neuroscientist and pioneer in the study of mindfulness explains why addictions are so tenacious and how we can learn to conquer them

  • Brewer's Dictionary of Twentieth Century Phrase and Fable

    Sets out to record the language that defines the contemporary age, reflecting all aspects of 20th-century life and culture in some 8000 entries, from the "abominable snowman" to "zoo daddy". Fully updated and revised to take account of the many recent historical and linguistic changes.

  • All the World and Her Husband: Women In The 20Th Century Consumer Culture

    Many of women's everyday experiences are tied up inextricably with consumption. In consumer culture research, it tends to be the activities and interests of women which take center stage. This collection provides a wide range of different perspectives on women as consumers, focusing on popular culture, including examinations of popular media and their targeting of female audiences. Apart from a grounding in feminism, the collection does not present a single view, theoretically, methodologically, or politically. Its contributors work across a wide range of disciplines, including cultural and media studies, design history, and sociolinguistics. What they all have in common is the aim of understanding women's experiences and struggles in relation to consumer culture in the 20th century.

  • Dorset

    Fully revised, updated, and expanded, this book offers a fresh and comprehensive account of the buildings of Dorset, one of England's best-loved and most beautiful counties. With its wonderful variety of building stones, Dorset offers visual pleasures which few English counties can match. Its country houses are exceptionally rich and varied, from medieval Woodsford and Athelhampton to the late Victorian splendors of Norman Shaw's Bryanston. Highlights among the churches include the former abbeys of Sherborne, Wimborne, and Milton. Towns include the mid-Georgian showpiece of Blandford Forum, the seaside resort of Weymouth, and ports large and small, from busy Poole to charming Lyme Regis. Featuring all new color photography, this volume is the ideal guide to one of the most architecturally rewarding regions in England.

  • Einstein: His Space and Times

    A revealing new portrait of Albert Einstein, the world's first scientific "superstar"

    The commonly held view of Albert Einstein is of an eccentric genius for whom the pursuit of science was everything. But in actuality, the brilliant innovator whose Theory of Relativity forever reshaped our understanding of time was a man of his times, always politically engaged and driven by strong moral principles. An avowed pacifist, Einstein's mistrust of authority and outspoken social and scientific views earned him death threats from Nazi sympathizers in the years preceding World War II. To him, science provided not only a means for understanding the behavior of the universe, but a foundation for considering the deeper questions of life and a way for the worldwide Jewish community to gain confidence and pride in itself.

    Steven Gimbel's biography presents Einstein in the context of the world he lived in, offering a fascinating portrait of a remarkable individual who remained actively engaged in international affairs throughout his life. This revealing work not only explains Einstein's theories in understandable terms, it demonstrates how they directly emerged from the realities of his times and helped create the world we live in today.

  • Cult of the Machine: Precisionism and American Art

    A fresh look at a bold and dynamic 20th-century American art style

    Characterized by highly structured, geometric compositions with smooth surfaces, linear qualities, and lucid forms, Precisionism fully emerged after World War I and flourished in the 1920s and 1930s. This insightful publication, featuring more than 100 masterworks by artists such as Charles Sheeler, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Charles Demuth, sheds new light on the Precisionist aesthetic and the intellectual concerns, excitement, tensions, and ambivalences about industrialization that helped develop this important strand of early American modernism.

    Essays explore the origins of the style--which reconciled realism with abstraction and adapted European art movements like Purism, Cubism, and Futurism to American subject matter--as well as its relationship to photography, and the ways in which it reflected the economic and social changes brought about by industrialization and technology in the post-World War I world. In addition to making a meaningful contribution to the resurging interest in Modernism and its revisionist narratives, this book offers copious connections between the past and our present day, poised on the verge of a fourth industrial revolution.

  • Adventures In Card Play

    Geza Ottlik had a remarkable talent for discovering and analysing strange and fascinating aspects of card play in bridge. This brilliant book is the result of his collaboration with Hugh Kelsey whose skill at high-level analysis of bridge problems was equalled only by his ability as a writer able to express complex ideas in simple prose.

    ADVENTURES IN CARD PLAY is regarded universally as one of the all-time great classics of bridge.

  • Wine Library: How to Taste Wine

    The art of wine tasting invites you to get to know a supreme pleasure of the world of the senses and the realm of the spirit. It's partly about value--identifying the quality of a wine so you never overpay at a restaurant or in stocking your own cellar. But, wine tasting is also about learning the difference between a good wine and a great one. Most important is the pleasure of taking a sip and knowing the story of where a wine came from, how its grapes were grown, the techniques used to make it, and how it can promise to provide an unforgettable evening. The quick course comes with instructions and exercises that train you in what to look for. Vocabulary tips are accompanied by "Tasting Briefs"--practical advice on everything from choosing wines with food to using all your senses of smell, taste, touch, sight, and even hearing.

  • Forging Capitalism: Rogues, Swindlers, Frauds, and the Rise of Modern Finance

    A riveting history of raw capitalism that exposes the unscrupulousness at its heart

    Vice is endemic to Western capitalism, according to this fascinating, wildly entertaining, often startling history of modern finance. Ian Klaus's Forging Capitalism demonstrates how international financial affairs in the nineteenth century were conducted not only by gentlemen as a noble pursuit but also by connivers, thieves, swindlers, and frauds who believed that no risk was too great and no scheme too outrageous if the monetary reward was substantial enough. Taken together, the grand deceptions of the ambitious schemers and the determined efforts to guard against them have been instrumental in creating the financial establishments of today. In a story teeming with playboys and scoundrels and rich in colorful and amazing events, Klaus chronicles the evolution of trust through three distinct epochs: the age of values, the age of networks and reputations, and, ultimately, in a world of increased technology and wealth, the age of skepticism and verification. In today's world, where the questionable dealings of large international financial institutions are continually in the spotlight, this extraordinary history has great relevance, offering essential lessons in both the importance and the limitations of trust.

  • Electronic Processes on Semiconductor Surfaces During Chemisorption

    "Hands are useless if there are no eyes to see what is obvious." -M. V. Lomonosov Dear Reader, I invite you to open this book and step on the semiconductor surface, where the processes that form the subject of the book come into play. The surface of the semiconductor is attracting more and more interest among researchers, in fact researchers in two different fields. These are notably the physicists and engineers engaged in research in semi- conductor physics and the making of semiconductor devices. The entire industry of semiconductor instruments hinges on the problem of the surface. The quality of semiconductor devices, whose use is growing steadily, depends essentially on the properties of the surface. The instability of these properties and their uncon- trollable alterations with temperature and under the influence of environmental conditions result in a lack of stability in the performance of semiconductor devices, hence the high percentage of waste in their industrial production. The methods used in factory laboratories to prevent such waste are largely empirical. The properties of the surface, the nature of the physicochemical processes that take place on it, and the role of environmental factors still remain obscure. A major task of the semiconductor industry is to learn to control the properties of the surface.

  • Developmental-Behavioral Disorders: Selected Topics

    Topics presented include: the role of autorelaxation and mental imagery in developmental pediatrics; graduates of the neonatal intensive care unit; self-destructive behaviors in children and adolescents; office screening for communication disorders; child and adolescent depression; television's impa

  • Psychoactive Drugs and Sex

    The search for artificial means of enhancing sexual experience is timeless and can even be found in the opening passages of Genesis (3:7) where Adam and Eve discovered sex as they took a bi te of the forbidden fruit: "And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked. " While others may interpret the "opening of their eyes" as simply an awareness of male and femaleness, John Milton and others regarded the forbidden fruit as an aphrodisiac and in Paradise Lost, described in greater detail what happened: "But the false fruit For other operation first displayed Carnal desire infiarning. He on Eve Began to cast lascivious eyes; she hirn As wantonly repaid; in lust they burn. " Not only did Milton regard the "forbidden fruit" as an aphro- disiac, he also identified it as an apple, and an apple it has re- mained until this day. Sexual behavior has always been one of the most fascinating and attention-arresting activities in human history and there has been no decrease in the fascination and curiosity it still arouses in the human psyche. 1 2 Introduction As timeless as the topic of sexual behavior is that of aphro- disiacs. For example, after the "forbidden fmit," the Bible specifi- cally identified mandrake as an aphrodisiac (Genesis 30:14-17): "And Reuben went, in the days of wheat harvest, and found mandrakes in the field, and brought them to his mother, Leah.

  • Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture

    An insightful new look at one of the 20th century's most celebrated artistic visionaries

    Alexander Calder (1898-1976) is one of modernism's most captivating and influential figures. First trained as a mechanical engineer, Calder relocated from New York to Paris in the mid-twenties where his acceptance into the city's burgeoning avant-garde circles coincided with the development of his characteristic form of kinetic sculpture. His early work Cirque Calder, which was presented throughout Paris to great acclaim, prefigures the performance and theatrical aspects that dominate Calder's pioneering artistic works and are situated as a primary subject of intrigue in this publication.

    Rather than simply refashion sculpture's traditional forms, Calder envisioned entirely new possibilities for the medium and transformed its static nature into something dynamic and responsive. Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture provides detailed insight into that pioneering process through reproductions of personal drawings and notes. Also featured is new research from a wide range of renowned scholars, furthering our understanding of the remarkable depth of Calder's beloved mobile sculptures and entrenching his status as an icon of modernism.

  • 5-Card Major Stayman

    There are definite benefits in allowing a One No-Trump opening to include a 5-card major. More and more experts at international level have adopted such a style.

    If you are an ambitious player and are keen to improve the range of your no-trump bidding you will need a method to locate a 5-card major with opener or to discover a 4-4 major fit.

    5-Card Major Stayman provides an easy structure that allows you to do just that and still enables you to use transfers to either major, even after a INT:2C response.

  • Biotechnology for Livestock Production

    Proceedings of the expert consultation prepared by the Animal Production and Health Division, FHO. Topics covered by the contributors include: biotechnology the frontiers of knowledge and methodologies, animal reproduction, animal genetics, animal growth, lactation, and fiber production, animal nutr

  • Barbarossa: The Russian German Conflict

    The classic account of the war on the Eastern Front between the Russians and the Germans - the greatest clash of arms the world has ever seen.

    Carefully researched and beautifully written, this book is a classic of military history. Alan Clark vividly narrates the course of the dramatic and brutal war between the German and Russians on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. From the invasion of Russia mounted on Midsummer's Day 1941 and the German Army's advance to the outskirts of Moscow, to the terrible turning point of Stalingrad and the eventual defeat of the Nazis at the Fall of Berlin after the hard years of fighting and advance by the Red Army, this is epic history narrated by a master.

  • Rauschenberg / Dante: Drawing a Modern Inferno

    Dante's Inferno inspired Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008) to create a series of 34 drawings that comprise one of the most remarkable creative enterprises of 20th-century American art. Completed between 1958 and 1960, XXXIV Drawings for Dante's Inferno introduced an innovative transfer process to the artist's tradition of combining found objects and photographic imagery from newspapers and other popular sources. The resulting powerful, abstract narrative runs parallel to Dante's allegorical journey through the underworld. This publication is the culmination of years of research to identify the images used in Rauschenberg's pieces, and Ed Krčma elucidates the work's deliberate commentary on the fraught political climate of the Cold War and its overall significance for the career of one of the postwar era's most influential figures. Exemplifying Rauschenberg's aptitude for collapsing distinctions between various disciplines, his interpretation of Dante's Inferno is explored in depth for the first time in this groundbreaking book.

  • Miyazakiworld: A Life in Art

    The story of filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki's life and work, including his significant impact on Japan and the world

    A thirtieth-century toxic jungle, a bathhouse for tired gods, a red-haired fish girl, and a furry woodland spirit--what do these have in common? They all spring from the mind of Hayao Miyazaki, one of the greatest living animators, known worldwide for films such as My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle, and The Wind Rises.

    Japanese culture and animation scholar Susan Napier explores the life and art of this extraordinary Japanese filmmaker to provide a definitive account of his oeuvre. Napier insightfully illuminates the multiple themes crisscrossing his work, from empowered women to environmental nightmares to utopian dreams, creating an unforgettable portrait of a man whose art challenged Hollywood dominance and ushered in a new chapter of global popular culture.

  • Rembrandt: Painter As Printmaker

    A compelling reconsideration of Rembrandt's printed oeuvre based on new research into the artist's life and work

    As a pioneering printmaker, Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) stood apart from his contemporaries thanks to his innovative approach to composition and his skillful rendering of space and light. He worked with the medium as a vehicle for artistic expression and experimentation, causing many to proclaim him the greatest etcher of all time. Moreover, the dissemination of the artist's prints outside of the Dutch Republic during his lifetime contributed greatly to establishing Rembrandt's reputation throughout Europe.

    Sumptuously illustrated with comparative paintings and drawings as well as prints, this important volume draws on exciting new scholarship on Rembrandt's etchings. Authors Jaco Rutgers and Timothy J. Standring examine the artist's prints from many angles. They reveal how Rembrandt intentionally varied the states of his etchings, printed them on exotic papers, and retouched prints by hand to create rarities for a clientele that valued unique impressions.

  • Jewish Materialism: The Intellectual Revolution of the 1870s

    A paradigm-shifting account of the modern Jewish experience, from one of the most creative young historians of his generation

    To understand the organizing framework of modern Judaism, Eliyahu Stern believes that we should look deeper and farther than the Holocaust, the establishment of the State of Israel, and the influence and affluence of American Jewry. Against the revolutionary backdrop of mid-nineteenth-century Europe, Stern unearths the path that led a group of rabbis, scientists, communal leaders, and political upstarts to reconstruct the core tenets of Judaism and join the vanguard of twentieth-century revolutionary politics.

    In the face of dire poverty and rampant anti-Semitism, they mobilized Judaism for projects directed at ensuring the fair and equal distribution of resources in society. Their program drew as much from the universalism of Karl Marx and Charles Darwin as from the messianism and utopianism of biblical and Kabbalistic works. Once described as a religion consisting of rituals, reason, and rabbinics, Judaism was now also rooted in land, labor, and bodies. Exhaustively researched, this original, revisionist account challenges our standard narratives of nationalism, secularization, and de-Judaization.

  • The Wittgenstein Vitrine - Modern Opulence in Vienna

    The Wittgenstein Vitrine, a monumental silver and gemstone-encrusted cabinet, is one of the most important and complex works produced by Austria's Wiener Werkstatte. Kevin W. Tucker weaves together a fascinating portrait of the vitrine, examining its stylistic origins and context, the powerful Wittgenstein family, and Vienna during its apogee of artistic ferment. His essay explores how the vitrine and its presentation at the 1908 Kunstschau embodied the debate over progressive ornamentation and suggested the evolving definition of modernity in the early 20th century. A companion essay by Fran Baas details the fascinating eight-month process of conserving the cabinet, revealing construction details unseen since its original assembly. Lavish photography throughout the book includes details of the vitrine's floral and faunal ornamentation as well as contextual images of related works by the Wiener Werkstatte. This book also serves as the only English-language publication detailing the work and biography of the vitrine's designer, Carl Otto Czeschka (1878-1960).

  • Embracing the Contemporary: The Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Collection

    This beautiful volume documents a historic gift of contemporary art from the Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Collection to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The gift, comprising nearly 100 works, includes masterpieces by luminaries such as Ellsworth Kelly and Jasper Johns, exceptional pieces by major British and German artists, and important works of outdoor sculpture, large-scale photography, and video art. All of these works, plus some 70 more from Keith and Katherine Sachs's personal collection, are discussed in detail and beautifully illustrated. In addition to catalogue entries on the objects, the book includes essays on artists represented in depth--Robert Gober, Richard Hamilton, Howard Hodgkin, Johns, Kelly, Brice Marden, Charles Ray, Richard Serra, and Joel Shapiro--written by distinguished scholars. Other texts, including an interview with Keith and Katherine Sachs and a statement authored by them, offer insight into their background as collectors and provide an intimate account of their extraordinary collecting endeavors marked by their lasting association with the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • Modernity and Its Discontents: Making and Unmaking the Bourgeois from Machiavelli to Bellow

    Steven B. Smith examines the concept of modernity, not as the end product of historical developments but as a state of mind. He explores modernism as a source of both pride and anxiety, suggesting that its most distinctive characteristics are the self-criticisms and doubts that accompany social and political progress. Providing profiles of the modern project's most powerful defenders and critics--from Machiavelli and Spinoza to Saul Bellow and Isaiah Berlin--this provocative work of philosophy and political science offers a novel perspective on what it means to be modern and why discontent and sometimes radical rejection are its inevitable by-products.

  • The Master Plan: Isis, Al-Qaeda, and the Jihadi Strategy for Final Victory

    An incisive narrative history of the Islamic State, from the 2005 master plan to reestablish the Caliphate to its quest for Final Victory in 2020

    Given how quickly its operations have achieved global impact, it may seem that the Islamic State materialized suddenly. In fact, al-Qaeda's operations chief, Sayf al-Adl, devised a seven-stage plan for jihadis to conquer the world by 2020 that included reestablishing the Caliphate in Syria between 2013 and 2016. Despite a massive schism between the Islamic State and al-Qaeda, al-Adl's plan has proved remarkably prescient. In summer 2014, ISIS declared itself the Caliphate after capturing Mosul, Iraq--part of stage five in al-Adl's plan. Drawing on large troves of recently declassified documents captured from the Islamic State and its predecessors, counterterrorism expert Brian Fishman tells the story of this organization's complex and largely hidden past--and what the master plan suggests about its future. Only by understanding the Islamic State's full history--and the strategy that drove it--can we understand the contradictions that may ultimately tear it apart.

  • Hampshire: South

    This volume, a companion to Hampshire: Winchester and the North, covers the county's southern half, from the woodland and heath of the New Forest to the cities along the Solent, and from remote Saxon churches to Modernist seaside villas. The original text has been fully revised to include new research and 130 specially commissioned color photographs. The guide explores major ecclesiastical monuments at Romsey, the Bishop of Winchester's palace at Bishops Waltham, and the remains of the great post-Dissolution houses at Beaulieu and Titchfield. At Southampton is one of England's best preserved medieval town walls, while at Portsmouth the structures of the 18th- and 19th-century Royal Navy dockyard are among the most important of their kind. Amid all this beauty are traces of conflict, from the Roman fort at Portchester, to the coastal castles of Henry VIII's rule, to the relics of the Normandy invasions of 1944.

  • Living Stones Pilgrimage

    The Holy Land has always had a magnetic attraction for Christians. Every year, hundreds of thousands tread the crowded streets of Jerusalem, or walk by the quiet waters of Galilee. There are hundreds of guidebooks deisgned for pilgrims and other visitors. The encounter with the stones which Jesus saw and touched has been, for many, a powerful spiritual experience. But the Christian presence is not just history. There are living, worshipping Christian communities in the Holy Land today. This unique guidebook is designed to help you encounter those communities, and to walk, talk and pray with contemporary Christians in Israel, the Palestinian and Occupied Territories; the 'living stones' os the book's title. Written half a century after the creation of the state of Israel, with the co-operation of all the Christian traditions in the Holy Land, it is a key companion for visitors who want to share for a while the thoughts and the life, witness and pressence of those who now live the faith of the apostles in this troubled land.

  • Electrochemical Sensors in Immunological Analysis

    X

  • The Cassell Dictionary of Word Histories

    offers an in-depth yet accessible study of a fascinating subject additional notes go far beyond other etymology dictionaries

  • Monteverdi′s Musical Theatre

    Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) is well known as the composer of the earliest operas still performed today. His Orfeo, Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria, and L'incoronazione di Poppea are internationally popular nearly four centuries after their creation. These seminal works represent only a part of Monteverdi's music for the stage, however. He also wrote numerous works that, while not operas, are no less theatrical in their fusion of music, drama, and dance. This impressive book is the first to survey Monteverdi's entire output of music for the theater--his surviving operas, lost operas, and other dramatic musical compositions.

    Tim Carter, a leading Monteverdi expert, begins by charting the progress of early opera from the north Italian courts to the "public" theaters of Venice. He places Monteverdi's stage works in the broader context of early seventeenth-century theatrical endeavor and explores crucial questions of genre, interpretation, and performance practices both then and now. Taking a pragmatic view of how the works were brought to life in the theater and how they were seen in their own time, Carter discusses the complex modes of production that involved a range of artists, artisans, creators, and performers. With insightful commentary on the composer's individual works and on the cultural and theatrical contexts in which they were performed, Carter casts new light on Monteverdi's remarkable achievement as a man of the theater.

  • After Buddhism: Rethinking the Dharma for a Secular Age

    A renowned Buddhist teacher's magnum opus, based on his fresh reading of the tradition's earliest texts

    Some twenty-five centuries after the Buddha started teaching, his message continues to inspire people across the globe, including those living in predominantly secular societies. What does it mean to adapt religious practices to secular contexts?

    Stephen Batchelor, an internationally known author and teacher, is committed to a secularized version of the Buddha's teachings. The time has come, he feels, to articulate a coherent ethical, contemplative, and philosophical vision of Buddhism for our age. After Buddhism, the culmination of four decades of study and practice in the Tibetan, Zen, and Theravada traditions, is his attempt to set the record straight about who the Buddha was and what he was trying to teach. Combining critical readings of the earliest canonical texts with narrative accounts of five members of the Buddha's inner circle, Batchelor depicts the Buddha as a pragmatic ethicist rather than a dogmatic metaphysician. He envisions Buddhism as a constantly evolving culture of awakening whose long survival is due to its capacity to reinvent itself and interact creatively with each society it encounters.

    This original and provocative book presents a new framework for understanding the remarkable spread of Buddhism in today's globalized world. It also reminds us of what was so startling about the Buddha's vision of human flourishing.

  • Unfinished Business: The Unexplored Causes of the Financial Crisis and the Lessons Yet to Be Learned

    A penetrating critique tracing how under-regulated trading between European and U.S. banks led to the 2008 financial crisis--with a prescription for preventing another meltdown

    There have been numerous books examining the 2008 financial crisis from either a U.S. or European perspective. Tamim Bayoumi is the first to explain how the Euro crisis and U.S. housing crash were, in fact, parasitically intertwined.

    Starting in the 1980s, Bayoumi outlines the cumulative policy errors that undermined the stability of both the European and U.S. financial sectors, highlighting the catalytic role played by European mega banks that exploited lax regulation to expand into the U.S. market and financed unsustainable bubbles on both continents. U.S. banks increasingly sold sub-par loans to under-regulated European and U.S. shadow banks and, when the bubbles burst, the losses whipsawed back to the core of the European banking system. A much-needed, fresh look at the origins of the crisis, Bayoumi's analysis concludes that policy makers are ignorant of what still needs to be done both to complete the cleanup and to prevent future crises.

  • Computer-Assisted Microscopy: The Measurement and Analysis of Images

    The use of computer-based image analysis systems for all kinds of images, but especially for microscope images, has become increasingly widespread in recent years, as computer power has increased and costs have dropped. Software to perform each of the various tasks described in this book exists now, and without doubt additional algorithms to accomplish these same things more efficiently, and to perform new kinds of image processing, feature discrimination and measurement, will continue to be developed. This is likely to be true particularly in the field of three-dimensional imaging, since new microscopy methods are beginning to be used which can produce such data. It is not the intent of this book to train programmers who will assemble their own computer systems and write their own programs. Most users require only the barest of knowledge about how to use the computer, but the greater their understanding of the various image analysis operations which are possible, their advantages and limitations, the greater the likelihood of success in their application. Likewise, the book assumes little in the way of a mathematical background, but the researcher with a secure knowledge of appropriate statistical tests will find it easier to put some of these methods into real use, and have confidence in the results, than one who has less background and experience. Supplementary texts and courses in statistics, microscopy, and specimen preparation are recommended as necessary.

  • Teamworking and Quality Improvement: Lessons from British and North American Organizations

    This work draws on examples of teamworking, quality improvement and innovation from 14 British and North American organizations. The 12 UK organizations were national finalists in the 1995 Michelin and Perkins Awards organized by the National Society for Quality through Teamwork (NSQT). the two American companies are global industry leaders which have won or have qualified for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award.

  • Scots and Catalans: Union and Disunion

    A landmark account that reveals the long history behind the current Catalan and Scottish independence movements

    A distinguished historian of Spain and Europe provides an enlightening account of the development of nationalist and separatist movements in contemporary Catalonia and Scotland. This first sustained comparative study uncovers the similarities and the contrasts between the Scottish and Catalan experiences across a five-hundred-year period, beginning with the royal marriages that brought about union with their more powerful neighbors, England and Castile respectively, and following the story through the centuries from the end of the Middle Ages until today's dramatic events.

    J. H. Elliott examines the political, economic, social, cultural, and emotional factors that divide Scots and Catalans from the larger nations to which their fortunes were joined. He offers new insights into the highly topical subject of the character and development of European nationalism, the nature of separatism, and the sense of grievance underlying the secessionist aspirations that led to the Scottish referendum of 2014, the illegal Catalan referendum of October 2017, and the resulting proclamation of an independent Catalan republic.

  • Van Gogh's Bedrooms

    A fascinating look at the genesis and meaning of Van Gogh's famed paintings of his bedroom

    Vincent van Gogh's The Bedroom, a painting of his room in Arles, is arguably the most famous depiction of a bedroom in the history of art. The artist made three versions of the work, now in the collections of the Van Gogh Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Musee d'Orsay. This book is the first in-depth study of their making and their meaning to the artist.

    In Van Gogh's Bedrooms, an international team of art historians, scientists, and conservators investigates the psychological and emotional significance of the bedroom in Van Gogh's oeuvre, surveying dwellings as a motif that appears throughout his work. Essays address the context in which the bedroom was first conceived, the uniqueness of the subject, and the similarities and differences among the three works both on and below the painted surface. The publication reproduces more than 50 paintings, drawings, and illustrated letters by the artist, along with other objects that evoke his peripatetic life and relentless quest for "home."

  • Approaches to the Study of Religion

    It has been argued that religious studies is a polymethodic discipline, and that the student of religion should be familiar with the approaches of the major disciplines concerned with understanding the nature of religion, not least because the approach adopted has profound influence on the phenomena chose for investigation and the conclusions reached.This book is the first textbook, specifically designed for undergraduate students, that provides the essential background on methods of the major relevant disciplines.Presenting each of the significant approaches to religion in an informed manner, the book brings together experienced researchers from feminism, anthropology, sociology, phenomenology, psychology, philosophy, and theology. It presents a consistent approach throughout, with each chapter dealing with the same themes: the historical development of the approach, the characteristics of the approach, and the surrounding issues and debates.

  • Bach's Major Vocal Works: Music, Drama, Liturgy

    Every year, Johann Sebastian Bach's major vocal works are performed to mark liturgical milestones in the Christian calendar. Written by a renowned Bach scholar, this concise and accessible book provides an introduction to the music and cultural contexts of the composer's most beloved masterpieces, including the Magnificat, Christmas Oratorio, and St. John Passion.

    In addition to providing historical information, each chapter highlights significant aspects--such as the theology of love--of a particular piece. This penetrating volume is the first to treat the vocal works as a whole, showing how the compositions were embedded in their original performative context within the liturgy as well as discussing Bach's musical style, from the detailed level of individual movements to the overarching aspects of each work. Published in the approach to Easter when many of these vocal works are performed, this outstanding volume will appeal to casual concertgoers and scholars alike.

  • Dior: The Collections, 1947-2017

    A stunning and comprehensive overview of the legendary house of Dior, from its founding in 1947 to today, featuring over 170 collections presented through original catwalk photography

    In spring 1947, Christian Dior presented the first collection of his newly founded eponymous fashion house. Soon dubbed the "New Look," it grabbed headlines all over the world and turned Dior into one of the most influential brands of all time. After the couturier's untimely death in 1957, Yves Saint Laurent took the helm of the fashion house before being succeeded by Marc Bohan, who was in turn replaced by Gianfranco Ferre in 1989. In 1996, John Galliano was appointed creative director, designing flamboyant collections for a decade, before the arrival of Raf Simon in 2012, who gave the house a newly imagined identity for the 21st century. Maria Grazia Chiuri's arrival in 2017 as the first woman designer in Dior's history also marks the seventieth anniversary of the "New Look."

    For the first time, every Dior haute couture collection is gathered here in a single, lavishly illustrated volume--providing a unique opportunity to chart the development of one of the world's most famous fashion brands and to discover rarely seen collections. Dior: The Complete Collections opens with a concise history of the house of Dior before exploring the collections themselves, which are organized chronologically. Each new "era" in Dior's history is inaugurated by a brief overview and biography of the new designer, while individual collections are introduced by a short text unveiling their influences and highlights and illustrated with carefully curated catwalk images. A rich reference section, including an extensive index, concludes this definitive publication.

  • The Biology of Taurine: Methods and Mechanisms

    I was pleased and at the same time filled with some misgivings when Professors Alberto Giotti end Ryan Huxtable asked me to introduce this book. The book is the outcome of the Symposium held in Firenze-San Miniato (PI), October 6-9, 1986. The symposium was entitled "Sulfur Amino Acids, Peptides and Related Compounds" and was the 7th international symposium on taurine ssnd assooiated substances. It is always difficult to introduce, with the right brevity end emphasis, a topic which has been studied in depth by numerous experte. Nevertheless, I shall do my best to give a historical perspeotive of the subjects of the meeting which I consider to be very important for the frontiers of researoh on taurine. he following topios have also beoome coherent areas of study during the development of researoh on taurine: metabolism, nutrition, neurochemistry, cardiovasoular regulation. Although taurine was isolated in 1821 by iedman and Gmel1n, its only biochemioal role known at the time was the synthesis of bile saIte in mammalian tissue. There has been an inoreasing interest in the biologioal action of taurine from metabolio aspects to other biologioal aspects (nutrition, development, eto.). In 1975 it was first demonstrated that taurine deprivation produoed retinal degeneration in cats; more reoent studies showed that a taurine-free diet or the administration of taurine transport inhibitors caused retinal degeneration in other mammlas. More reoent studies have pointed out the role of taurine in development, and the first part of this book is dedicated to these topios.

  • Irving Penn - Beyond Beauty

    An accessible overview of the work of legendary American photographer Irving Penn

    Famous for his fashion portraits and experimentation with still life images, Irving Penn (1917-2009) ranks as one of the foremost photographers of the 20th century. In an illustrious career that spanned nearly 70 years, Penn was a master of both black-and-white and color photography, and his revival of platinum printing in the 1960s and 1970s was a catalyst for significant change in the art world.

    Drawing from the extensive holdings of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, including a major gift from The Irving Penn Foundation, this magnificent catalogue compiles 161 of Penn's iconic images, including a number of unpublished works. Beautifully designed and illustrated, Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty accompanies the first retrospective exhibition of Penn's work in nearly 20 years and features photographs from all stages of his career, including street scenes from the late 1930s, celebrity portraits, Parisian fashion photographs, and more private studio images. Merry A. Foresta's captivating essay introduces this photographer to a younger generation and delves into Penn's use of photography to respond to social and cultural change, speaking to the depths of human existence.

  • Print Style: Hand-Printed Patterns for Home Decoration

    Enliven your home with bursts of color and brightness of hand-printed patterns! These techniques -- so simple that even a beginner will get great results -- can embellish so many different items. Master five forms of printing, design patterns and motifs, and complete more than 20 great projects. Did you know a potato could help you decorate? Just cut out a pattern, dip it in ink or paint, and press! Build complex, multicolored silk screen motifs. In resist-dyeing, wax prevents the dye from seeping into parts of the fabric, allowing a pattern to develop. Experiment with a potato-printed, Nepalese-inspired fish design. Admire your handiwork in the Free shadings of a resist-dyed seagull pattern hanging on the wall. The results will make you the envy of all your friends.

  • Sleep in Early Modern England

    A riveting look at how the early modern world revolutionized sleep and its relation to body, mind, soul, and society

    Drawing on diverse archival sources and material artifacts, Handley reveals that the way we sleep is as dependent on culture as it is on biological and environmental factors. After 1660 the accepted notion that sleepers lay at the mercy of natural forces and supernatural agents was challenged by new medical thinking about sleep's relationship to the nervous system. This breakthrough coincided with radical changes shaping everything from sleeping hours to bedchambers. Handley's illuminating work documents a major evolution in our conscious understanding of the unconscious.

  • The Last Days of Stalin

    A gripping account of the months before and after Stalin's death and how his demise reshaped the course of twentieth-century history

    Joshua Rubenstein's riveting account takes us back to the second half of 1952 when no one could foresee an end to Joseph Stalin's murderous regime. He was poised to challenge the newly elected U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower with armed force, and was also broadening a vicious campaign against Soviet Jews. Stalin's sudden collapse and death in March 1953 was as dramatic and mysterious as his life. It is no overstatement to say that his passing marked a major turning point in the twentieth century.

    The Last Days of Stalin is an engaging, briskly told account of the dictator's final active months, the vigil at his deathbed, and the unfolding of Soviet and international events in the months after his death. Rubenstein throws fresh light on

    • the devious plotting of Beria, Malenkov, Khrushchev, and other "comrades in arms" who well understood the significance of the dictator's impending death;
    • the witness-documented events of his death as compared to official published versions;
    • Stalin's rumored plans to forcibly exile Soviet Jews;
    • the responses of Eisenhower and Secretary of State Dulles to the Kremlin's conciliatory gestures after Stalin's death; and
    • the momentous repercussions when Stalin's regime of terror was cut short.

  • Speaking Out: Writings on Sex, Law, Politics and Society 1954-95

    In 1997 it will be thirty years since the Sexual Offences Act of 1967 made sex between two men aged over 21 in private no longer a crime. It also marks the seventieth birthday of Antony Grey, who was one of the leading campaigners for homosexual law reform in the 1960s. The articles and talks reprinted in this book (together with others published here for the first time) cover the whole span of Grey's campaigning life, ranging from his first, anonymous, letter to the press about homosexuality written in 1954 to his thoughts on present-day sexual politics in the 1990s. Topics covered include law reform, religious and social attitudes to homosexuality, sex education, young people and sex, and the gay movement. The book concludes with a newly-written essay reviewing the progress achieved since the middle of this century and assessing what remains to be done as we enter the coming one. Never afraid of controversy, Antony Grey provides a unique summary of a pioneering campaigner's forty years of gay activism. For over 40 years, Antony Grey has been a leading campaigner, not only for gay rights, but also for better laws about, and more sensible attitudes towards, sex generally. As Secretary of the Homosexual Law Reform Society during the 1960s, Director of the Albany Trust in the 1970s, and later as a freelance writer and counsellor, he has worked publicly and consistently for individual sexual emancipation and collective common sense. Discussion includes law and morality, pornogaphy and free speech, the Church and homosexuality, young people and definitions of consent, sex education, gay politics from the homophile movement to queer, and outing.

  • Advances in Nutritional Research: 7 (Advances in Nutritional Research)

    Volume 7 of Advances in Nutritional Research continues the theme of this series in providing authoritative accounts of the current state of knowledge regarding major topics of research in the nutritional sciences. The topics have been selected for their interest to researchers, students, and teachers in medicine, agriculture, and the various branches of the biological sciences which relate to nutritional health. The authenticity of the accounts is assured by the widely recognized contributions of the authors to research on their respective topics. vii Contents 1 Chapter 1. Food Allergy ........... . David J. Pearson and Alison McKee 1. Introduction............................... 1.1. General Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2. Classification of Adverse Reactions to Foods . . . . . . .. . . 2 1.3. Classification and Time Course of Allergic Reactions . . . .. 4 2. The Atopic Syndrome ......................... 5 2.1. Atopy ............................... 5 2.2. IgE (Reaginic) Antibodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 6 . . 3. The Diagnosis of Food Allergy .................... 8 3.1. Provocative Feeding Tests .................... 8 3.2. Skin Tests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.3. Measurement of Specific Antibodies 10 3.3.1. IgE Antibodies ... 10 3.3.2. Non-IgE Antibodies . . . . . 11 3.4. Controversial Techniques . . . . . . 11 3.5. Summary of Diagnostic Procedures .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . 12 4. Clinical Food Allergic Syndromes. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 13 . 4.1. Classical Reaginic Syndromes . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 13 . . 4.1.1. Presenting Complaints .................. 13 4.1.2. Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 13 . . . .

  • Latest Readings

    In 2010, Clive James was diagnosed with terminal leukemia. Deciding that "if you don't know the exact moment when the lights will go out, you might as well read until they do," James moved his library to his house in Cambridge, where he would "live, read, and perhaps even write." James is the award-winning author of dozens of works of literary criticism, poetry, and history, and this volume contains his reflections on what may well be his last reading list. A look at some of James's old favorites as well as some of his recent discoveries, this book also offers a revealing look at the author himself, sharing his evocative musings on literature and family, and on living and dying. As thoughtful and erudite as the works of Alberto Manguel, and as moving and inspiring as Randy Pausch's The Last Lecture and Will Schwalbe's The End of Your Life Book Club, this valediction to James's lifelong engagement with the written word is a captivating valentine from one of the great literary minds of our time.

  • The Battle for Syria: International Rivalry in the New Middle East

    An unprecedented analysis of the crucial but underexplored roles the United States and other nations have played in shaping Syria's ongoing civil war

    Most accounts of Syria's brutal, long-lasting civil war focus on a domestic contest that began in 2011 and only later drew foreign nations into the escalating violence. Christopher Phillips argues instead that the international dimension was never secondary but that Syria's war was, from the very start, profoundly influenced by regional factors, particularly the vacuum created by a perceived decline of U.S. power in the Middle East. This precipitated a new regional order in which six external protagonists--the United States, Russia, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and Qatar--have violently competed for influence, with Syria a key battleground.

    Drawing on a plethora of original interviews, Phillips constructs a new narrative of Syria's war. Without absolving the brutal Bashar al-Assad regime, the author untangles the key external factors which explain the acceleration and endurance of the conflict, including the West's strategy against ISIS. He concludes with some insights on Syria and the region's future.

  • Topological Properties and Global Structure of Space-Time

    The Ninth Course of the International School of Cosmology and Gravita- tion of the Ettore Majorana Centre for Scientific Culture is concerned with "Topological Properties and Global Structure of Space-Time." We consider this topic to possess great importance. Our choice has also been influenced by the fact that there are many quest ions as yet unre- solved. Standard general relativity describes space-time as a four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifold, but it does not prescribe its large-scale structure. Inorderto attempt answers to some topological questions, such as whether our universe is open or closed, whether it is orientable, and whether it is complete or possesses singularities, various theoretical approaches to global aspects of gravitational physics are presented here. As topological questions playa role in non-standard theories as weIl, it will be found that some of the lectures and seminar talks in this volume adopt the point of view of standard relativity, whereas others are based on different theories, such as Kaluza-Klein theories, bimetric theories, and supergravity. We have found it difficult to organize these papers into classes, say standard and non-standard theory, or models with and without singularities. One paper, by R. Reasenberg, is experimental. Its purpose was to give the theorists present an inkling of the opportunities, as weIl as the pitfalls, of experimental research in gravitational physics. Accordingly, we have arranged all contributions alphabetically, by first-named) author.

  • Donald Judd

    An authoritative look at the art, life, and legacy of a revered artist

    This pioneering, critically acclaimed book, originally published in 2010 and now available in paperback, is an authoritative and enlightening guide to a wide array of works by the great American artist Donald Judd (1928-1994). Showcasing the entire breadth of Judd's practices, the book draws on documents from nearly twenty archives and investigates Judd and his work both within and outside the context of the 1960s Minimalist art movement. David Raskin explains why some of Judd's works seem startlingly ephemeral while others remain insistently physical; in the process of answering this perplexing question, Raskin traces Judd's principles from his beginnings as an art critic through his fabulous installations and designs in Marfa, Texas.

    Raskin develops a truly singular picture of Judd: he shows us an artist who asserted his individuality with spare designs; who found spiritual values in plywood, Plexiglas, and industrial production; who refused to distinguish between thinking and feeling while asserting that science marked the limits of knowledge; who claimed that his art provided intuitions of morality but not a specific set of tenets; and who worked for political causes that were neither left nor right.

  • Zarathustra’s Secret: The Interior Life of Friedrich Nietzsche

    More than a century after his death in 1900, Nietzsche remains a seminal figure in the history of European intellectual life. Celebrated as a liberator by some, maligned as a pernicious influence by others, he was the subject of controversy during his lifetime, pursuing a hedonistic individualism and espousing concepts such as the Superman and the Will to Power until he died after a decade of institutionalized insanity.

    In this groundbreaking biography, Joachim Kohler seeks for the first time to understand Nietzsche's philosophy through a reconstruction of his inner life. In a revealing reinterpretation of his letters, diaries, and writings, Kohler shows that Nietzsche's suppressed homosexuality, generating a hatred of Christianity and conventional morality, was a central influence on his work. Further, Kohler argues, his philosophical position was fundamentally compromised by the concealment of his forbidden sexual desire. Throughout his life, the unhappy genius was also plagued by horrible nightmares, stemming from his much-loved father's death, which led to a profoundly disturbed conscience and an intense loathing of metaphysics.

    Seeking to disguise the truth of his innermost torments, Nietzsche contrived the persona of Zarathustra. The story of the great Persian philosopher, contends Kohler, reveals Nietzsche's own suppression and dionysiac liberation, and presents the culmination of his secret yearnings in the new myth of the Superman who, in his naked beauty, resembled the gods of classical Greece.

  • English Medieval Embroidery: Opus Anglicanum

    In medieval Europe, embroidered textiles were indispensable symbols of wealth and power. Owing to their quality, complexity, and magnificence, English embroideries enjoyed international demand and can be traced in Continental sources as opus anglicanum (English work). This sumptuously illustrated book draws on new research and detailed photography to offer an introduction to their design, production, and use. Essays by leading experts explore the embroideries' artistic and social context, while catalogue entries examine individual masterpieces. Medieval embroiderers lived in a tightly knit community in London, and many were women who can be identified by name today. Comparisons between their work and contemporary painting challenge modern assumptions about the hierarchy of artistic media. Contributors consider an outstanding range of surviving examples, highlighting their exquisite craftsmanship and exploring the world in which they were created.

  • Chloride Channels and Carriers in Nerve, Muscle, and Glial Cells

    This is a book about how Cl- crosses the cell membranes of nerve, muscle, and glial cells. Not so very many years ago, a pamphlet rather than book might have resulted from such an endeavor! One might ask why Cl-, the most abundant biological anion, attracted so little attention from investigators. The main reason was that the prevailing paradigm for cellular ion homeostasis in the 1950s and 1960s assigned Cl- a ther- modynamically passive and unspecialized role. This view was particularly prominent among muscle and neuroscience investigators. In searching for reasons for such a negative (no pun intended) viewpoint, it seems to us that it stemmed from two key experimental observations. First, work on frog skeletal muscle showed that Cl- was passively distributed between the cytoplasm and the extracellular fluid. Second, work on Cl- transport in red blood cells confirmed that the Cl- transmembrane distribution was thermodynamically passive and, in addition, showed that Cl- crossed the mem- brane extremely rapidly. This latter finding [for a long time interpreted as being the result of a high passive chloride electrical permeability(? CI)] made it quite likely that Cl- would remain at thermodynamic equilibrium. These two observations were gener- alized and virtually all cells were thought to have a very high P Cl and a ther- modynamically passive Cl- transmembrane distribution. These concepts can still be found in some physiology and neuroscience textbooks.

  • Mark Dion: Misadventures of a 21st-Century Naturalist

    A comprehensive survey of American artist Mark Dion, examining three decades of his critically engaged practice interrogating our relationship with nature

    The first book in two decades to consider the entire oeuvre of Mark Dion (b. 1961), this volume examines thirty years of the American artist's pioneering inquiries into how we collect, interpret, and display nature. Part of a generation of artists expanding institutional critique in the 1990s, Dion adopted the methods of the archaeologist or the natural history museum, juxtaposing natural objects, taxidermy, books, and more to reorganize the natural and the manmade in poetic, witty ways. These sculptures, installations, and interventions offer novel approaches to questioning institutional power, which he sees as connected to the control and representation of nature.

    Generously illustrated, this publication introduces new insights and features more than seventy-five artworks. Essays address topics ranging from Dion's ecological activism to his loving critique of museums. A diverse group of contributors explores his work as a teacher, his public artworks such as Neukom Vivarium in Seattle, and his intricate curiosity cabinets installed throughout the world. They reveal how Dion's practice and formal investigations--which are rooted in history--connect to contemporary questions of disciplinary boundaries and the acquisition of knowledge in the age of the Anthropocene.

  • Bacillus

    The genus Bacillw; has a long history of importance, both from an economic point of view and as a source of experimental microorganisms. This volume critically reviews aspects of identification, molecular biology, and growth that are of impor- tance for the current and anticipated future exploitation of members of this group. In addition, the volume includes a chapter on taxonomy, as the importance of good taxonomy is often not fully appreciated; on sporulation, since so many important products are produced concomitantly with this process and we are beginning to understand the mechanisms by which the process is controlled; and, finally, on the cell envelope, as we are only just beginning to appreciate the significance of dif- ferences between the cell walls of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria for productivity and processing. The commercial importance of Bacillus lies mainly in the area of enzyme pro- duction for the food, drink, and detergent markets. Increasingly, however, the ability of Bacillus to secrete proteins, coupled with its regulatory acceptability, has resulted in strenuous efforts to develop species of Bacillus as hosts for the produc- tion of value-added heterologous proteins. Difficulties have often been encoun- tered, indicating a need to divert more resources to improving our understanding of the molecular biology of members of this grou p. Experience with Escherichia coli, a far from ideal organism from a commercial point of view, suggests that an in- creased investment in Bacillus is likely ultimately to be productive.

  • Arithmetic of Algebraic Curves

    Author S.A. Stepanov thoroughly investigates the current state of the theory of Diophantine equations and its related methods. Discussions focus on arithmetic, algebraic-geometric, and logical aspects of the problem. Designed for students as well as researchers, the book includes over 250 excercises accompanied by hints, instructions, and references. Written in a clear manner, this text does not require readers to have special knowledge of modern methods of algebraic geometry.

  • The Infertile Male: The Clinician's Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment

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  • Soft Furnishings

    This practical guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to make 65 household furnishings, from cushions and lampshades to blinds and bed linen. It also features inspirational advice on creating different period styles, and gives a room-by-room survey of furnishing possibilities.

  • Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect

    "Undoing is just as much a democratic right as doing."---Gordon Matta-Clark

    This revealing book looks at the groundbreaking work of Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978), whose socially conscious practice blurred the boundaries between contemporary art and architecture. After completing a degree in architecture at Cornell University, Matta-Clark returned to his home city of New York. There he employed the term "anarchitecture," combining "anarchy" and "architecture," to describe the site-specific works he initially realized in the South Bronx.

    The borough's many abandoned buildings, the result of economic decline and middle-class flight, served as Matta-Clark's raw material. His series Cuts dissected these structures, performing an anatomical study of the ravaged urban landscape. Moving from New York to Paris with Conical Intersect, a piece that became emblematic of artistic protest, Matta-Clark applied this same method to a pair of 17th-century row houses slated for demolition as a result of the Centre Pompidou's construction. This compelling volume grounds Matta-Clark's practice against the framework of architectural and urban history, stressing his pioneering activist-inspired approach, as well as his contribution to the nascent fields of social practice and relational aesthetics.

  • The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition

    Winner of the 2017 Frederick Douglass Prize

    A groundbreaking history of abolition that recovers the largely forgotten role of African Americans in the long march toward emancipation from the American Revolution through the Civil War


    Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents the influence of the Haitian Revolution and the centrality of slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. This book is a comprehensive new history of the abolition movement in a transnational context. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave's cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.

    Honors include:

    • Longlist title for the 2016 National Book Awards Nonfiction category
    • Winner of the 2017 Best Book Prize by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic
    • Winner of the 2016 Avery O. Craven Award given by the Organization of American Historians
    • Honorable Mention in the U.S. History category for the 2017 American Publishers Awards for Professional & Scholarly Excellence (PROSE)
    • Winner of the 2017 Frederick Douglass Book Prize, jointly sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at the MacMillan Center at Yale University
    • 2017 James A. Rawley Award for the Best Book on Secession and the Sectional Crisis published in the last two years, Southern Historical Association

  • Drug Studies in the Elderly: Methodological Concerns

    Clinical trials are the most definitive tool for evaluation of the applica- bility of clinical investigations. The main objective of clinical investiga- tions is to assess the potential value of a therapeutic entity in the treat- ment or prophylaxis of a disease or a condition. It is also deemed necessary at this stage to obtain information regarding the undesirable side effects, associated risks, and their interrelationship with clinical assessments. Most of these clinical investigations conform, in some form or fashion, to the guidelines adopted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a given class of compounds. Clinical investigations in the past have not included specific studies in special or subpopulations, e.g., the elderly. Because of an ever-increasing elderly population, newer policies for clinical investigations are now being debated with the recognition of enhanced drug sensitivity in this special population. This key research activity can lead not only to improved health care in the elderly but also to control of its costs.

  • Regulating Sex in the Roman Empire: Ideology, the Bible, and the Early Christians

    A New Testament scholar challenges the belief that American family values are based on "Judeo-Christian" norms by drawing unexpected comparisons between ancient Christian theories and modern discourses

    Challenging the long-held assumption that American values--be they Christian or secular--are based on "Judeo-Christian" norms, this provocative study compares ancient Christian discourses on marriage and sexuality with contemporary ones, maintaining that modern family values owe more to Roman Imperial beliefs than to the bible.

    Engaging with Foucault's ideas, Wheeler-Reed examines how conservative organizations and the Supreme Court have misunderstood Christian beliefs on marriage and the family. Taking on modern cultural debates on marriage and sexuality, with implications for historians, political thinkers, and jurists, this book undermines the conservative ideology of the family, starting from the position that early Christianity, in its emphasis on celibacy and denunciation of marriage, was in opposition to procreation, the ideological norm in the Greco-Roman world.

  • Animal-Shaped Vessels from the Ancient World: Feasting With Gods, Heroes, and Kings

    Vessels shaped as bulls, lions, birds, donkeys, and other animals were routinely used to pour and drink liquids at feasts throughout the ancient world. Bringing together animal-shaped vessels from the Mediterranean, the Near and Far East, and the Americas, this fascinating cross-cultural study is the first large-scale consideration of this phenomenon. Experts from around the world reveal how these entertaining, often extremely lifelike vessels functioned not only as feasting paraphernalia but also as ritual implements, symbols of social status, and objects of artistic exchange and experimentation. Taking up questions ranging from the mechanics of drinking from such unwieldy containers to considerations of what the preference for these shapes says about the nature of human-animal relationships, this book uses a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach to offer a unique window onto the experiences of the individuals and communities who raised up these magnificent objects in pleasure and in praise.

  • Degas: A Passion for Perfection

    A beautiful celebration of six decades of work by Edgar Degas, published in the centennial year of the artist's death

    Edgar Degas's (1834-1917) relentless experimentation with technical procedures is a hallmark of his lifelong desire to learn. The numerous iterations of compositions and poses suggest an intense self-discipline, as well as a refusal to accept any creative solution as definitive or finite. Published in the centenary year of the artist's death, this book presents an exceptional array of Degas's work, including paintings, drawings, pastels, etchings, monotypes, counter proofs, and sculpture, with approximately sixty key works from private and public collections in Europe and the United States, some of them published here for the first time. Shown together, the impressive works represent well over half a century of innovation and artistic production.

    Essays by leading Degas scholars and conservation scientists explore his practice and recurring themes of the human figure and landscape. The book opens with a study of Degas's debt to the Old Masters, and it concludes with a consideration of his artistic legacy and his influence on leading artists of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Francis Bacon, Frank Auerbach, Ryan Gander, David Hockney, Howard Hodgkin, R. B. Kitaj, Pablo Picasso, and Walter Sickert.

  • Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry

    Starts with the most fundamental aspects of the subject and work to the more complex. Topics treated include the electron overlap contribution to the double layer potential difference; the electron transfer theory; farzdaic rectification; photoelectrochemical reduction of CO 2; aluminum in aqueous s

  • Marihuana, the First Twelve Thousand Years

    Of all the plants men have ever grown, none has been praised and denounced as often as marihuana (Cannabis sativa). Throughout the ages, marihuana has been extolled as one of man's greatest benefactors- and cursed as one of his greatest scourges. Marihuana is undoubtedly a herb that has been many things to many people. Armies and navies have used it to make war, men and women to make love. Hunters and fishermen have snared the most ferocious creatures, from the tiger to the shark, in its herculean weave. Fashion designers have dressed the most elegant women in its supple knit. Hangmen have snapped the necks of thieves and murderers with its fiber. Obstetricians have eased the pain of childbirth with its leaves. Farmers have crushed its seeds and used the oil within to light their lamps. Mourners have thrown its seeds into blazing fires and have had their sorrow transformed into blissful ecstasy by the fumes that filled the air. Marihuana has been known by many names: hemp, hashish, dagga, bhang, loco weed, grass-the list is endless. Formally christened Cannabis sativa in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus, marihuana is one of nature's hardiest specimens. It needs little care to thrive. One need not talk to it, sing to it, or play soothing tranquil Brahms lullabies to coax it to grow. It is as vigorous as a weed. It is ubiquitous. It fluorishes under nearly every possible climatic condition.

  • Lions and Lambs: Conflict in Weimar and the Creation of Post-Nazi Germany

    A bold new interpretation of Germany's democratic transformation in the twentieth century, focusing on the generation that shaped the post-Nazi reconstruction

    Not long after the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust, Germans rebuilt their shattered country and emerged as one of the leading nations of the Western liberal world. In his debut work, Noah Strote analyzes this remarkable turnaround and challenges the widely held perception that the Western Allies--particularly the United States--were responsible for Germany's transformation. Instead, Strote draws from never-before-seen material to show how common opposition to Adolf Hitler united the fractious groups that had once vied for supremacy under the Weimar Republic, Germany's first democracy (1918-1933). His character-driven narrative follows ten Germans of rival worldviews who experienced the breakdown of Weimar society, lived under the Nazi dictatorship, and together assumed founding roles in the democratic reconstruction.

    While many have imagined postwar Germany as the product of foreign-led democratization, this study highlights the crucial role of indigenous ideas and institutions that stretched back decades before Hitler. Foregrounding the resolution of key conflicts that crippled the country's first democracy, Strote presents a new model for understanding the origins of today's Federal Republic.

  • Tudor Fashion

    The captivating story of Tudor dress, its construction and symbolism, and the people who made and wore it

    The Tudor monarchs and their courtiers are some of the best-known figures in history. They continue, even today, to spark our curiosity and imagination. Their enduring popularity is no doubt partly due to the iconic portraits in which they are depicted in magnificent style, in farthingales and ruffs, furs and jewels, codpieces and cloaks, and vast expanses of velvet and silk. Far from being mere decoration, fashion was pivotal in the communication of status and power. It was used as a tool in securing and holding the tenuous Tudor throne and as a competitive weapon in the factions, intrigues and love-affairs of the court.

    This book presents new information about the fashions of the Tudor dynasty, offering fresh insight into their social and political milieu. Histories of Kings and Queens complement stories of unsung dressmakers, laundresses, and officials charged with maintaining and transporting the immense Tudor wardrobes from palace to palace. Evidence from rare surviving garments and textiles, original documents, fine and decorative art, and archaeological findings enhance our understanding of the Tudors and their courts. Handsomely illustrated, this sumptuous book contextualises Tudor dress within the buildings in which it was worn and fills in gaps in our knowledge of the period and its fascinating historical figures.

  • Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    Monomolecular assemblies on substrates, now termed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, have been studied for over half a century. Their development can be viewed in three stages. Following the pioneering work of Irving Langmuir and Katharine Blodgett in the late 1930s there was a brief flurry of activity just before and just after the Second World War. Many years later Hans Kuhn published his stimulating work on energy transfer. This German contribution to the field, made in the mid-1960s, can be regarded as laying the foundation for studies of artificial systems of cooperat- ing molecules on solid substrates. However, the resurgence of activity in academic and industrial laboratories, which has resulted in four large international con- ferences, would not have occurred but for British and French groups highlighting the possible applications of LB films in thefield of electronics. Many academic and industrial establishments involved in high technology are now active in or maintaining a watching brief on the field. Nevertheless this impor- tant area of solid state science is still perhaps largely unfamiliar to many involved in materials or electronic device research. The richness of the variety of organic molecular materials suitable for LB film deposition offers enormous scope for those interested in their basic properties or their practical applications. LB films are now an integral part of the field of molecular electronics. It seems inevitable that they will play some role in replacing inorganic materials in certain areas of application.

  • Pedigree: A Memoir

    Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano has said that his many fictions are all variations of the same story. Pedigree, his memoir, is the theme.

    In this rare glimpse into the life of Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano, the author takes up his pen to tell his personal story. He addresses his early years--shadowy times in postwar Paris that haunt his memory and have inspired his world-cherished body of fiction. In the spare, absorbing, and sometimes dreamlike prose that translator Mark Polizzotti captures unerringly, Modiano offers a memoir of his first twenty-one years. Termed one of his "finest books" by the Guardian, Pedigree is both a personal exploration and a luminous portrait of a world gone by.

    Pedigree sheds light on the childhood and adolescence that Modiano explores in Suspended Sentences, Dora Bruder, and other novels. In this work he re-creates the louche, unstable, colorful world of his parents under the German Occupation; his childhood in a household of circus performers and gangsters; and his formative friendship with the writer Raymond Queneau. While acknowledging that memory is never assured, Modiano recalls with painful clarity the most haunting moments of his early life, such as the death of his ten-year-old brother. Pedigree, Modiano's only memoir, is a gift to his readers and a master key to the themes that have inspired his writing life.

  • Integrable Geodesic Flows on Two-Dimensional Surfaces

    Geodesic flows of Riemannian metrics on manifolds are one of the classical objects in geometry. A particular place among them is occupied by integrable geodesic flows. We consider them in the context of the general theory of integrable Hamiltonian systems, and in particular, from the viewpoint of a new topological classification theory, which was recently developed for integrable Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom. As a result, we will see that such a new approach is very useful for a deeper understanding of the topology and geometry of integrable geodesic flows. The main object to be studied in our paper is the class of integrable geodesic flows on two-dimensional surfaces. There are many such flows on surfaces of small genus, in particular, on the sphere and torus. On the contrary, on surfaces of genus 9 > 1, no such flows exist in the analytical case. One of the most important and interesting problems consists in the classification of integrable flows up to different equivalence relations such as (1) an isometry, (2) the Liouville equivalence, (3) the trajectory equivalence (smooth and continuous), and (4) the geodesic equivalence. In recent years, a new technique was developed, which gives, in particular, a possibility to classify integrable geodesic flows up to these kinds of equivalences. This technique is presented in our paper, together with various applications. The first part of our book, namely, Chaps.

  • The Siege of Acre, 1189-1191: Saladin, Richard the Lionheart, and the Battle That Decided the Third Crusade

    The first comprehensive history of the most decisive military campaign of the Third Crusade and one of the longest wartime sieges of the Middle Ages

    The two-year-long siege of Acre (1189-1191) was the most significant military engagement of the Third Crusade, attracting armies from across Europe, Syria, Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Maghreb. Drawing on a balanced selection of Christian and Muslim sources, historian John D. Hosler has written the first book-length account of this hard-won victory for the Crusaders, when England's Richard the Lionheart and King Philip Augustus of France joined forces to defeat the Egyptian Sultan Saladin. Hosler's lively and engrossing narrative integrates military, political, and religious themes and developments, offers new perspectives on the generals, and provides a full analysis of the tactical, strategic, organizational, and technological aspects on both sides of the conflict. It is the epic story of a monumental confrontation that was the centerpiece of a Holy War in which many thousands fought and died in the name of Christ or Allah.

  • Private Lives: Curious Facts About the Famous and Infamous

    Over 200 entries on famous people, offering information on their human side as well as their achievements. Included in the entries is the fact that Elizabeth I used to drink beer at breakfast and Cervantes only had one arm.

  • Wild Soundscapes: Discovering the Voice of the Natural World

    A founder of soundscape ecology offers a pioneering field guide for listening to and recording the sounds of the wild

    Through his organization Wild Sanctuary, Bernie Krause has traveled the globe to hear and record the sounds of diverse natural habitats. Wild Soundscapes, first published in 2002, inspires readers to follow in Krause's footsteps. The book enchantingly shows how to find creature symphonies (or, as Krause calls them, "biophonies"); use simple microphones to hear more; and record, mix, and create new expressions with the gathered sounds. After reading this book, readers will feel compelled to investigate a wide range of habitats and animal sounds, from the conversations of birds and howling sand dunes to singing anthills.

    This rewritten and updated edition explains the newest technological advances and research, encouraging readers to understand the earth's soundscapes in ways previously unimaginable. With links to the sounds that are discussed in the text, this accessible and engaging guide to natural soundscapes will captivate amateur naturalists, field recordists, musicians, and anyone else who wants to fully appreciate the sounds of our natural world.

  • Intelligence in the Flesh: Why Your Mind Needs Your Body Much More Than It Thinks

    An enthralling exploration that upends the prevailing view of consciousness and demonstrates how intelligence is literally embedded in the palms of our hands

    If you think that intelligence emanates from the mind and that reasoning necessitates the suppression of emotion, you'd better think again--or rather not "think" at all. In his provocative new book, Guy Claxton draws on the latest findings in neuroscience and psychology to reveal how our bodies--long dismissed as mere conveyances--actually constitute the core of our intelligent life. From the endocrinal means by which our organs communicate to the instantaneous decision-making prompted by external phenomena, our bodies are able to perform intelligent computations that we either overlook or wrongly attribute to our brains.

    Embodied intelligence is one of the most exciting areas in contemporary philosophy and neuropsychology, and Claxton shows how the privilege given to cerebral thinking has taken a toll on modern society, resulting in too much screen time, the diminishment of skilled craftsmanship, and an overvaluing of white-collar over blue-collar labor. Discussing techniques that will help us reconnect with our bodies, Claxton shows how an appreciation of the body's intelligence will enrich all our lives.

  • Integration of Mitochondrial Function

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  • The Road Past Mandalay

    The second part of the bestselling novelist's autobiography about his time in the Gurkhas during the second world war

    This is the second part of John Masters' autobiography: how he fought with his Gurkha regiment during World War II until his promotion to command one of the Chindit columns behind enemy lines in Burma. Written by a bestselling novelist at the height of his powers, it is an exceptionally moving story that culminates in him having to personally shoot a number of wounded British soldiers who cannot be evacuated before their position is overrun by the Japanese. It is an uncomfortable reminder that Churchill's obsession with 'special forces' squandered thousands of Allied lives in operations that owed more to public relations than strategic calculation. This military and moral odyssey is one of the greatest of World War II frontline memoirs.

  • Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest

    A firsthand account and incisive analysis of modern protest, revealing internet-fueled social movements' greatest strengths and frequent challenges

    To understand a thwarted Turkish coup, an anti-Wall Street encampment, and a packed Tahrir Square, we must first comprehend the power and the weaknesses of using new technologies to mobilize large numbers of people. An incisive observer, writer, and participant in today's social movements, Zeynep Tufekci explains in this accessible and compelling book the nuanced trajectories of modern protests--how they form, how they operate differently from past protests, and why they have difficulty persisting in their long-term quests for change.

    Tufekci speaks from direct experience, combining on-the-ground interviews with insightful analysis. She describes how the internet helped the Zapatista uprisings in Mexico, the necessity of remote Twitter users to organize medical supplies during Arab Spring, the refusal to use bullhorns in the Occupy Movement that started in New York, and the empowering effect of tear gas in Istanbul's Gezi Park. These details from life inside social movements complete a moving investigation of authority, technology, and culture--and offer essential insights into the future of governance.

  • Achieving Quality Performance: Lessons from British Industry

    A hands-on approach to total quality management. This text shows why, how and what action is necessary to achieve improved manufacturing and service performance. Designed for managers in industry, it focuses on the practicalities of implementing and sustaining a successful programme.

  • Biochemistry of the Eye

    My first introduction to the eye came more than three decades ago when my close friend and mentor, the late Professor Isaac C. Michaelson, convinced me that studying the biochemistry of ocular tissues would be a rewarding pursuit. I hastened to explain that I knew nothing about the subject, since relatively few basic biochemical studies on ocular tissues had appeared in the world literature. Professor Michaelson assured me, however, that two books on eye biochemistry had already been written. One of them, a beautiful monograph by Arlington Krause ( 1934) of Johns Hopkins Hospital, is we II worth reading even today for its historical perspective. The other, published 22 years later, was written by Antoinette Pirie and Ruth van Heyningen ( 1956), whose pioneering achievements in eye biochemistry at the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology in Oxford, England are known throughout the eye research community and beyond. To their credit are classical investigations on retinal, corneal, and lens biochemistry, beginning in the 1940s and continuing for many decades thereafter. Their important book written in 1956 on the Biochemistry of the Eye is a volume that stood out as a landmark in this field for many years. In recent years, however, a spectacular amount of new information has been gener- ated in ocular biochemistry. Moreover, there is increasing specialization among investiga- tors in either a specific field of biochemistry or a particular ocular tissue.

  • Safety, Health and Environmental Hazards in the Workplace

    Many improvements to health and safety have recently been introduced in the workplace. Issues such as stress, RSI and backache are now recognized and, in part, understood. However, in many other areas progress in slow. Examining workplace safety, this book suggests that the key to future progress lies in the impetus of the environmental movement. Topics covered include management responsibility, the cost of workplace accidents, "sick building syndrome", hazardous chemicals, dust, workplace inspections and European law. Containing over 30 international cases studies, this illustrated text has an extensive bibliography and a directory of where to obtain help and advice.

  • Modern Cellular Automata: Theory and Applications

    It is with great pleasure that I present this fourth vol- ume in the series "Advanced Applications in Pattern Recognition." It would be difficult to find two authors better versed in the design and application of parallel image processing systems, due to both their own many years of pioneering in the field and their encyclopedic knowledge of what is going on in uni- versity and industrial laboratories around the world. The monograph is unique in its parallel presentation of orthogonal and hexagonal dissections, and the wealth of graphic illustration of algorithmic procedures for processing and analyz- ing images in the various known implementations of parallel im- age-processing architectures. This volume should find a place on the bookshelf of every practitioner of pattern recognition, image processing, and compu- ter graphics. Morton Nadler General Editor vii PREFACE This book endeavors to introduce the reader to the subject of cellular logic and cellular automata and is devoted particu- larly to those parts dealing with the manipulation of pictorial data. The study of cellular automata owes much to the pioneer- ing work of John von Neumann during the 1950s. Von Neumann was interested in general problems in the behavior of computing structures and was immensely impressed by the complexity and performance of the human brain, which he felt must point to- wards successful designs for automatic computing machines.

  • The Enigma of the Owl: An Illustrated Natural History

    A rare invitation into the mysterious lives of owls around the world, with spectacularly revealing photographs and fascinating details

    Perhaps no other creature has so compelling a gaze as the owl. Its unblinking stare mesmerizes; its nocturnal lifestyle suggests secrets and mystery. This lavishly illustrated book celebrates owls from every corner of the world and offers abundant details on fifty-three of the most striking and interesting species, from the tiny Elf Owl of southwestern American deserts to the formidable Blakiston's Fish Owl, the largest of all owls.

    Mike Unwin has long studied and admired these remarkable birds from cold northern forests to tropical rivers and beyond. He explains how owls evolved into the supreme feathered predators of the night, and he examines their breeding and hunting behaviors, unusual calls, and the cultural myths and superstitions that surround different species. More than two hundred dramatic color photographs in the wild, taken or selected by David Tipling, capture the wondrous beauty of each owl and the drama of life in its own home region.

  • Owens, Laura

    A richly illustrated, expansive mid-career survey of the stand-out American artist's pioneering and influential work

    Published to coincide with a major exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art that travels to Dallas and Los Angeles, this book on the work of Laura Owens (b. 1970) features an incisive introduction by Scott Rothkopf, critical essays, literary texts, and short commentaries on a variety of subjects related to the artist's broad interests, which range from folk art and needlework to comics and wallpaper.

    Reflections by more than twenty of Owens's fellow artists, collaborators, assistants, dealers, family members, and friends offer an array of perspectives on her work at different periods in her life, beginning with her high school years in Ohio and ending with her current exhibition. A rich trove of more than a thousand images, drawn from the artist's personal archive and largely unpublished before now, includes personal correspondence, journals, academic transcripts, handwritten notes, source material, exhibition announcements, clippings, and installation photographs.

    Together, all of these elements provide a rare and intimate look at how an artist might make her way in the world as well as how art gets made, movements take hold, and relationships evolve over time.

    Each book includes a specially designed set of stickers that readers can use to customize their own cover.

  • Understanding Slam Bidding

    To bid in a controlled auction to a successful slam is one of the great pleasures of bridge. Understanding Slam Bidding teaches you the important modern conventions, but more importantly, it shows you how to think so that you can tell whether a card in your hand is just what partner wants, or is waste paper.

    If you take the time to study this book you will find yourself bidding successful slams with fewer points than is normally considered necessary, and you will avoid bidding slams that are doomed to fail when you have lots of points but no fit.

  • Cold War Monks: Buddhism and America's Secret Strategy in Southeast Asia

    The groundbreaking account of U.S. clandestine efforts to use Southeast Asian Buddhism to advance Washington's anticommunist goals during the Cold War

    How did the U.S. government make use of a "Buddhist policy" in Southeast Asia during the Cold War despite the American principle that the state should not meddle with religion? To answer this question, Eugene Ford delved deep into an unprecedented range of U.S. and Thai sources and conducted numerous oral history interviews with key informants. Ford uncovers a riveting story filled with U.S. national security officials, diplomats, and scholars seeking to understand and build relationships within the Buddhist monasteries of Southeast Asia.

    This fascinating narrative provides a new look at how the Buddhist leaderships of Thailand and its neighbors became enmeshed in Cold War politics and in the U.S. government's clandestine efforts to use a predominant religion of Southeast Asia as an instrument of national stability to counter communist revolution.

  • John Singer Sargent and the Art of Allusion

    A revealing, interdisciplinary exploration of the brilliant visual quotations in the work of the celebrated grand-manner portraitist

    The work of portraitist John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) has come to epitomize the glamour and anxiety of his age. In this innovative study, Bruce Redford reveals the web of visual quotations and references that informed Sargent's most ambitious paintings. Throughout his career, Sargent was recognized and rewarded as a "Young Master" whose bravura portraits inspired comparison with the likes of Velazquez, Van Dyck, and Reynolds. At the same time, his paintings responded to the stylistic experiments and cultural preoccupations of a world on the cusp of modernity. Sargent achieved this complex synthesis through a pictorial language composed of witty acts of allusion.

    John Singer Sargent and the Art of Allusion offers the first sustained inquiry into the painter's practice of quotation--one that created a complex visual code. Through comparative analysis among thematic groupings of portraits and analogous literary texts, Redford shows how Sargent devised and transmitted that code. The result is an enhanced awareness of Sargent's daring gamesmanship, his place in the history of portraiture, and the dynamics of allusion in both art and literature.

  • Play All: A Bingewatcher's Notebook

    A world-renowned media and cultural critic offers an insightful analysis of serial TV drama and the modern art of the small screen

    Television and TV viewing are not what they once were--and that's a good thing, according to award-winning author and critic Clive James. Since serving as television columnist for the London Observer from 1972 to 1982, James has witnessed a radical change in content, format, and programming, and in the very manner in which TV is watched. Here he examines this unique cultural revolution, providing a brilliant, eminently entertaining analysis of many of the medium's most notable twenty-first-century accomplishments and their not always subtle impact on modern society--including such acclaimed serial dramas as Breaking Bad, The West Wing, Mad Men, and The Sopranos, as well as the comedy 30 Rock. With intelligence and wit, James explores a television landscape expanded by cable and broadband and profoundly altered by the advent of Netflix, Amazon, and other "cord-cutting" platforms that have helped to usher in a golden age of unabashed binge-watching.

  • Catch-67: The Left, the Right, and the Legacy of the Six-Day War

    A controversial examination of the internal Israeli debate over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from a best-selling Israeli author

    Since the Six-Day War, Israelis have been entrenched in a national debate over whether to keep the land they conquered or to return some, if not all, of the territories to Palestinians. In 2017, best-selling Israeli author Micah Goodman published a balanced and insightful analysis of the situation that quickly became one of Israel's most debated books of the year. Now available in English translation with a new preface by the author, Catch-67 deftly sheds light on the ideas that have shaped Israelis' thinking on both sides of the debate, and among secular and religious Jews about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

    Contrary to opinions that dominate the discussion, he shows that the paradox of Israeli political discourse is that both sides are right in what they affirm--and wrong in what they deny. Although he concludes that the conflict cannot be solved, Goodman is far from a pessimist and explores how instead it can be reduced in scope and danger through limited, practical steps. Through philosophical critique and political analysis, Goodman builds a creative, compelling case for pragmatism in a dispute where a comprehensive solution seems impossible.

  • Peggy Guggenheim: The Shock of the Modern

    A spirited portrait of the colorful, irrepressible, and iconoclastic American collector who fearlessly advanced the cause of modern art

    One of twentieth-century America's most influential patrons of the arts, Peggy Guggenheim (1898-1979) brought to wide public attention the work of such modern masters as Jackson Pollock and Man Ray. In her time, there was no stronger advocate for the groundbreaking and the avant-garde. Her midtown gallery was the acknowledged center of the postwar New York art scene, and her museum on the Grand Canal in Venice remains one of the world's great collections of modern art. Yet as renowned as she was for the art and artists she so tirelessly championed, Guggenheim was equally famous for her unconventional personal life, and for her ironic, playful desire to shock.

    Acclaimed best-selling author Francine Prose offers a singular reading of Guggenheim's life that will enthrall enthusiasts of twentieth-century art, as well as anyone interested in American and European culture and the interrelationships between them. The lively and insightful narrative follows Guggenheim through virtually every aspect of her extraordinary life, from her unique collecting habits and paradigm-changing discoveries, to her celebrity friendships, failed marriages, and scandalous affairs, and Prose delivers a colorful portrait of a defiantly uncompromising woman who maintained a powerful upper hand in a male-dominated world. Prose also explores the ways in which Guggenheim's image was filtered through the lens of insidious antisemitism.

  • Witcraft: The Invention of Philosophy in English

    An ambitious new history of philosophy in English that broadens the canon to include many lesser-known figures

    Ludwig Wittgenstein once wrote that "philosophy should be written like poetry." But philosophy has often been presented more prosaically as a long trudge through canonical authors and great works. But what, Jonathan Ree asks, if we instead saw the history of philosophy as a haphazard series of unmapped forest paths, a mass of individual stories showing endurance, inventiveness, bewilderment, anxiety, impatience, and good humor?

    Here, Jonathan Ree brilliantly retells this history, covering such figures as Descartes, Locke, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Mill, James, Frege, Wittgenstein, and Sartre. But he also includes authors not usually associated with philosophy, such as William Hazlitt, George Eliot, Darwin, and W. H. Auden. Above all, he uncovers dozens of unremembered figures--puritans, revolutionaries, pantheists, feminists, nihilists, socialists, and scientists--who were passionate and active readers of philosophy, and often authors themselves. Breaking away from high-altitude narratives, he shows how philosophy finds its way into ordinary lives, enriching and transforming them in unexpected ways.

  • Water and Ions in Biological Systems

    As the First International Conference on Water and Ions in Biological Systems (Bucharest, June 25-27, 1980) was appreciated as a success, a second one was organized in the fall of the year 1982 under the sponsorship of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences, the Romanian Biophysical Society (Union of Societies for Medical Sciences in the Socialist Republic of Romania) and in co- operation with the International Union for Pure and Applied Bio- physics (IUPAB). The responsibility for the scientific program and organization of the Second Conference on Water fell on an International Scientific Committee which included Prof. J. Tigyi (Pees), President of the UNESCO Expert Committee on Biophysics, Prof. K. Wuthrich, Secretary General of IUPAB and Prof. H. Eisenberg, (member of the IUPAB Council) under the guidance of an Executive Board whose members were Prof. J. Jaz (representative of UNESCO), Prof. B. Pullman (Vice- President of IUPAB) and Prof. V. Vasilescu (President of the Romanian Biophysical Society). The Meeting was attended by more than 250 specialists including 150 Romanian participants and others from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, England, the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland, USSR, USA, Venezuela, Yugoslavia. The proceedings of the Conference took place in the Medical Faculty of Bucharest. The theoretical and practical importance of the Meeting was pointed out by the speakers, among whom were Prof.

  • The Road To Berlin

    A compelling account of the Red Army's epic struggle to drive the Germans out of Russia and back to Berlin.

    Beginning with the destruction of the German Sixth Army at Stalingrad, THE ROAD TO BERLIN is the story of how the Red Army drove the Germans from its territory, and finally invaded the Reich.

    Using an enormous range of primary sources - Soviet, German and Eastern European - John Erickson describes fighting and hardship on a scale almost unimaginable in the West. He provides a detailed narrative of all the battles on all the fronts, and also of the Soviet system of war which achieved, under maximum stress, near impossible feats in the field and in the factories. The book also tells of the diplomatic moves and counter-moves, including the all-important conferences at Tehran and Yalta.

    Comprehensive, compelling, and immensely readable, it is an indispensable book for any student of the Second World War.

  • Order and Chaos in Nonlinear Physical Systems

    This volume is concerned with the theoretical description of patterns and instabilities and their relevance to physics, chemistry, and biology. More specifically, the theme of the work is the theory of nonlinear physical systems with emphasis on the mechanisms leading to the appearance of regular patterns of ordered behavior and chaotic patterns of stochastic behavior. The aim is to present basic concepts and current problems from a variety of points of view. In spite of the emphasis on concepts, some effort has been made to bring together experimental observations and theoretical mechanisms to provide a basic understanding of the aspects of the behavior of nonlinear systems which have a measure of generality. Chaos theory has become a real challenge to physicists with very different interests and also in many other disciplines, of which astronomy, chemistry, medicine, meteorology, economics, and social theory are already embraced at the time of writing. The study of chaos-related phenomena has a truly interdisciplinary charac- ter and makes use of important concepts and methods from other disciplines. As one important example, for the description of chaotic structures the branch of mathematics called fractal geometry (associated particularly with the name of Mandelbrot) has proved invaluable. For the discussion of the richness of ordered structures which appear, one relies on the theory of pattern recognition. It is relevant to mention that, to date, computer studies have greatly aided the analysis of theoretical models describing chaos.

  • C. S. Lewis's Lost Aeneid: Arms and the Exile

    C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) is best remembered as a literary critic, essayist, theologian, and novelist, and his famed tales The Chronicles of Narnia and The Screwtape Letters have been read by millions. Now, A. T. Reyes reveals a different side of this diverse man of letters: translator.

    Reyes introduces the surviving fragments of Lewis's translation of Virgil's epic poem, which were rescued from a bonfire. They are presented in parallel with the Latin text, and are accompanied by synopses of missing sections, and an informative glossary, making them accessible to the general reader. Writes Lewis in A Preface to Paradise Lost, "Virgil uses something more subtle than mere length of time.... It is this which gives the reader of the Aeneid the sense of having lived through so much. No man who has read it with full perception remains an adolescent." Lewis's admiration for the Aeneid, written in the 1st century BC and unfolding the adventures of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of the Romans, is evident in his remarkably lyrical translation.

    C. S. Lewis's Lost Aeneid is part detective story, as Reyes recounts the dramatic rescue of the fragments and his efforts to collect and organize them, and part illuminating look at a lesser-known and intriguing aspect of Lewis's work.

  • Max Lamb: Exercises in Seating

    A fascinating exploration of Max Lamb's experimentation with materials, craft, and technology

    One of the most exciting designers working today, Max Lamb (b. 1980) has received international acclaim for his innovative experiments with materials, craft, and technology. Drawn to the form of the chair and its relationship to the human body, Lamb has explored many different inventive outcomes in his ever-evolving Exercises in Seating project.

    This book investigates over a decade of creative practice with a focus on his interest in seating--from stone thrones to wood chairs and enameled-steel stools. In Lamb's own words, "A seat is very simple in function, but very complex in the many different characters, forms, and ideas it can express." Both retrospective and forward looking, this volume--created in collaboration with the artist--is the most thorough investigation of Lamb's work to date and features an exclusive interview with noted artist Ryan Gander in which the designer discusses his creative processes and goals.

  • They Were Her Property: White Women As Slave Owners in the American South

    A bold and searing investigation into the role of white women in the American slave economy

    Bridging women's history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South's slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America.

  • Mapping the Heavens: The Radical Scientific Ideas That Reveal the Cosmos

    For all curious readers, a lively introduction to radical ideas and discoveries that are transforming our knowledge of the universe

    This book provides a tour of the "greatest hits" of cosmological discoveries--the ideas that reshaped our universe over the past century. The cosmos, once understood as a stagnant place, filled with the ordinary, is now a universe that is expanding at an accelerating pace, propelled by dark energy and structured by dark matter. Priyamvada Natarajan, our guide to these ideas, is someone at the forefront of the research--an astrophysicist who literally creates maps of invisible matter in the universe. She not only explains for a wide audience the science behind these essential ideas but also provides an understanding of how radical scientific theories gain acceptance.

    The formation and growth of black holes, dark matter halos, the accelerating expansion of the universe, the echo of the big bang, the discovery of exoplanets, and the possibility of other universes--these are some of the puzzling cosmological topics of the early twenty-first century. Natarajan discusses why the acceptance of new ideas about the universe and our place in it has never been linear and always contested even within the scientific community. And she affirms that, shifting and incomplete as science always must be, it offers the best path we have toward making sense of our wondrous, mysterious universe.

  • Rival Power: Russia's Influence in Southeast Europe


    A nuanced and comprehensive study of the political dynamics between Russia and key countries in Southeast Europe Is Russia threatening to disrupt more than two decades' of E.U. and U.S. efforts to promote stability in post-communist Southeast Europe? Politicians and commentators in the West say, "yes." With rising global anxiety over Russia's political policies and objectives, Dimitar Bechev provides the only in-depth look at this volatile region.

    Deftly unpacking the nature and extent of Russian influence in the Balkans, Greece, and Turkey, Bechev argues that both sides are driven by pragmatism and opportunism rather than historical loyalties. Russia is seeking to assert its role in Europe's security architecture, establish alternative routes for its gas exports-including the contested Southern Gas Corridor-and score points against the West. Yet, leaders in these areas are allowing Russia to reinsert itself to serve their own goals. This urgently needed guide analyzes the responses of regional NATO members, particularly regarding the annexation of Crimea and the Putin-Erdogan rift over Syria.

  • Luc Tuymans: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings: 1972-1994

    This first volume in a catalogue raisonne of Tuymans's paintings surveys nearly 200 works from the vital early years of his career

    Credited with a key role in the revival of painting in the 1990s, Belgian artist Luc Tuymans (b. 1958) continues to produce subtle, and at times unsettling, works that engage with history, technology, and everyday life. This first volume in a catalogue raisonne of Tuymans's paintings surveys nearly 200 works that were vital to his artistic development. The years 1972 to 1994 witnessed the maturation of his signature method of painting from preexisting imagery--such as magazine images, Polaroids, and television footage--as well as his first solo exhibition. Also dating from this period are many of his seminal canvases, along with ten poignant portraits of the ailing human body and the enigmatic series Superstition that comprised his first works exhibited in the United States.

    The catalogue features brilliant new photography of each of the paintings and an illustrated chronology with archival images and installation shots of the works in this volume. This publication is a testament to Tuymans's persistent assertion of the relevance and importance of painting--a conviction that he maintains even in today's digital world, when his work continues to be a touchstone for artists and scholars.

  • Elliptic Differential Equations and Obstacle Problems

    In the few years since their appearance in the mid-sixties, variational inequalities have developed to such an extent and so thoroughly that they may now be considered an "institutional" development of the theory of differential equations (with appreciable feedback as will be shown). This book was written in the light of these considerations both in regard to the choice of topics and to their treatment. In short, roughly speaking my intention was to write a book on second-order elliptic operators, with the first half of the book, as might be expected, dedicated to function spaces and to linear theory whereas the second, nonlinear half would deal with variational inequalities and non variational obstacle problems, rather than, for example, with quasilinear or fully nonlinear equations (with a few exceptions to which I shall return later). This approach has led me to omit any mention of "physical" motivations in the wide sense of the term, in spite of their historical and continuing importance in the development of variational inequalities. I here addressed myself to a potential reader more or less aware of the significant role of variational inequalities in numerous fields of applied mathematics who could use an analytic presentation of the fundamental theory, which would be as general and self-contained as possible.

  • Einstein's Unfinished Symphony: The Story of a Gamble, Two Black Holes, and a New Age of Astronomy

    An updated classic that recounts the long hunt for Einstein's predicted gravitational waves--and celebrates their recent discovery

    In February 2016, astronomers announced that they had verified the last remaining prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity--vibrations in space-time, called gravitational waves. Humanity can now tune in to a cosmic orchestra. We have heard the chirp of two black holes dancing toward a violent union. We will hear the cymbal crashes from exploding stars, the periodic drumbeats from swiftly rotating pulsars, and maybe even the echoes from the Big Bang itself.

    Marcia Bartusiak was one of the first to report on the new generation of observatories, showing the motivations of the detectors' creators and the gamble they made to prove Einstein right when all other attempts had failed. She traces the quest of astronomers to build the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, the most accurate measuring devices humans have created, and the discovery of gravitational waves, revealing the brilliance, personalities, and luck required to start a new age of astronomy.

  • Handbook of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings

    For two decades, I have been responding to questions about the nature of health psychology and how it differs from medical psychology, behavioral medicine, and clinical psychology. From the beginning, I have taken the position that any applica- tion of psychological theory or practice to problems and issues of the health system is health psychology. I have repeatedly used an analogy to Newell and Simon's "General Problem Solver" program of the late 1950s and early 1960s, which had two major functional parts, in addition to the "executive" component. One was the "problem-solving core" (the procedural competence); the other was the representa- tion of the "problem environment. " In the analogy, the concepts, knowledge, and techniques of psychology constitute the core competence; the health system in all its complexity is the problem environment. A health psychologist is one whose basic competence in psychology is augmented by a working knowledge of some aspect of the health system. Quite apparently, there are functionally distinct aspects of health psychology to the degree that there are meaningful subdivisions in psychological competence and significantly different microenvironments within the health system. I hesitate to refer to them as areas of specialization, as the man who gave health psychology its formal definition, Joseph Matarazzo, has said that there are no specialties in psychology (cited in the editors' preface to this book).

  • Where Song Began: Australia's Birds and How They Changed the World

    An authoritative and entertaining exploration of Australia's distinctive birds and their unheralded role in global evolution

    Renowned for its gallery of unusual mammals, Australia is also a land of extraordinary birds. But unlike the mammals, the birds of Australia flew beyond the continent's boundaries and around the globe many millions of years ago. This eye-opening book tells the dynamic but little-known story of how Australia provided the world with songbirds and parrots, among other bird groups, why Australian birds wield surprising ecological power, how Australia became a major evolutionary center, and why scientific biases have hindered recognition of these discoveries.

    From violent, swooping magpies to tool-making cockatoos, Australia's birds are strikingly different from birds of other lands--often more intelligent and aggressive, often larger and longer-lived. Tim Low, a renowned biologist with a rare storytelling gift, here presents the amazing evolutionary history of Australia's birds. The story of the birds, it turns out, is inseparable from the story of the continent itself and also the people who inhabit it.

  • Network Management and Control

    Like the 120 volt standard for electricity, the appearance of standards in network management heralds new opportunities for creativity and achievement. As one example, within the framework of these evolving standards, consider a system of local area networks connecting computing equipment from different vendors. A bridge 1qc. k:8 up because of a transient caused by a repeater failure. The result is a massive disconnecHon of virtual circuits. What is the role of the manager and the network management system in solving the problem? How does the vendor implement the solution? How does the user use it? What measurements should be made? How should they be displayed? How much of the diagnosis and correction should be automated? How does the solution change with different hardware and software? In the IEEE Communications Magazine, I recently reported a timely illustration in the area of problems in fault management. At the workshop hotel, "I was waiting for a room assignment at the reception desk, when my attendant left the counter for a moment. Upon returning, he took one look at his screen and whined an accusatory question at everyone in sight, 'Who logged out my terminal?' Who indeed! It wasn't any of us. It was the system.

  • Polymers in Solution: Theoretical Considerations and Newer Methods of Characterization

    Polymers in Solution was written for scientists and engineers who have serious research interests in newer methods for characterization of polymer solutions, but who are not seasoned experts in the theoretical and experimental aspects of polymer science. In particular, it is assumed that the reader is not familiar with the development of theoretical notions in conformational statistics and the dynamics of chainlike molecules; how these two seemingly diverse theoretical topics are related; and the role played by polymer-solvent interactions. Chapter 1 thus presents background material that introduces most of the essential concepts, including some of the mathematical apparatus most commonly used in these areas of theory. This introduction is followed by five chapters that are more closely related to particular experimental techniques. These chapters introduce further theoretical notions as needed. Three of the chapters present con- siderable detail on the experimental methods, while two other chapters deal more with the interpretation of experimental results in terms of current theories. Although neutron scattering has become an almost standard technique for the study of conformational properties of macromolecules in the solid state, there has been less emphasis on its application for characterization of polymer molecules in solution. Chapter 4 covers this growing area of application.

  • Not by Birth Alone

    Explores the concept of Jewish identity.

  • Applied Differential Games

    This book grew out of a set of lecture notes for a one- semester course on dynamic game theory held at the University of Technology, Vienna. It is intended primarily at the graduate level for students in operations research, management science, applied mathematics, and eco- nomics. I hope that I have been able to give the reader an accessible introduction to the subject of nonzero-sum dif- ferential games with particular emphasis on applications. It would be irrational to try to re ach total com- prehensiveness in a single volume. Therefore, I have resisted the temptation to "over-cannibalize" previous textbooks and monographs on the subject. It has rather been my desire to cover material that (I think) is impor- tant and interesting, but gets left out of these publications. Writing a book is quite a game. In the beginning -before c10sing the binding agreement* with Plenum-I believed this to be a fi-nite horizon game. Time, however, * Key words will be explained in the text. 7 PREFACE 8 was a merciless arbiter. I am grateful to the Senior Editor, Dr. Ken Derharn, for allowing manuscript delivery to become a (restricted) free terminal time problem. Most of all, I thank my wife Grace for offering me the needed spiritual support, and my two-year-old daughter Sabrina for ignoring the paradoxical situation that there are games which prevent Dad from playing with her.

  • Advances in X-Ray Analysis

    The 38th Annual Denver Conference on Applications of X-Ray Analysis was held July 31 - August 4, 1989, at the Sheraton Denver Technical Center, Denver, Colorado. The conference alternates emphasis between x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence, and this being an odd year the emphasis was on diffraction. Thus the Plenary Session was slanted toward diffraction in general and thin film analysis in particular. The Plenary Session on x-ray analysis of thin films did not just happen this year but really began four years ago with Paul Predecki suggesting a special session devoted to thin film techniques. The session generated a great deal of interest, so Paul suggested that a workshop on thin films should be slated for the 1987 conference. A full day was devoted to the workshop, which was split into a half day on epitaxial thin films and the other half day on polycrystalline thin films. The workshop attendance indicated a great deal of interest in this topic, leading to this year's Plenary Session. The first two speakers of the Plenary Session (B. Tanner and K. Bowen) have been key throughout the thin film activities. They were invited speakers for the 1985 special session on thin films and instructors for the 1987 workshop on epitaxial thin films.

  • Andy Warhol / Ai Weiwei

    This stunning publication is the first to examine in tandem the work and influence of two towering figures in contemporary art

    Andy Warhol (1928-1987) and Ai Weiwei (b. 1957) are two of the most internationally renowned artists of the past 100 years, famous not only for their artwork but also for influencing the culture of their time. This exciting book is the first to consider the work of these artists alongside one another, in dialogue and in correspondence, to explore the artists' meticulous observations of modern and contemporary art, life, and politics. Andy Warhol's investigation of consumer society, fame, and celebrity offers thought-provoking points of connection with Ai Weiwei's interrogation of the relationship between tradition and modernity, the role of the individual to the state, questions of human rights, and the value of freedom of expression. Parallels also exist between the ways in which each artist transformed the understanding of artistic value and studio production, and redefined the role of the artist--as impresario, cultural producer, activist, and brand.

    Alongside beautifully reproduced images by both artists--including works by Ai Weiwei published here for the first time--are illuminating essays by an international team of art experts, curators, and scholars that survey the scope of the artists' careers and interpret the significant impact of Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei on modern art and contemporary life. This deluxe, collectible catalogue is available in three different, limited-edition colors.

  • Rooted Cosmopolitans: Jews and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century

    A stunningly original look at the forgotten Jewish political roots of contemporary international human rights, told through the moving stories of five key activists

    The year 2018 marks the seventieth anniversary of two momentous events in twentieth-century history: the birth of the State of Israel and the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Both remain tied together in the ongoing debates about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, global antisemitism, and American foreign policy. Yet the surprising connections between Zionism and the origins of international human rights are completely unknown today. In this riveting account, James Loeffler explores this controversial history through the stories of five remarkable Jewish founders of international human rights, following them from the prewar shtetls of eastern Europe to the postwar United Nations, a journey that includes the Nuremberg and Eichmann trials, the founding of Amnesty International, and the UN resolution of 1975 labeling Zionism as racism. The result is a book that challenges long-held assumptions about the history of human rights and offers a startlingly new perspective on the roots of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

  • The Big Show: The Greatest Pilot's Story of World War II

    When The Big Show was first published, paper rationing meant that the text had to be heavily cut. Now, for the first time, this international bestseller has been returned to its complete, and breathtaking, original state. Pierre Clostermann was a Free French fighter ace who flew with the RAF during the Second World War. Over the course of five years he engaged in hundreds of dog-fights, shot down scores of Luftwaffe planes, escorted American bombers on some of the most dangerous raids of the war, and watched many of his friends falling to their deaths in the skies over the Channel. The Big Show, his incredible account of the air war over Britain and France, has become one of the most famous memoirs of the Second World War. Now in its original state, it contains everything one could wish for in a war memoir: wonderfully observed descriptions of wartime Britain, frighteningly evocative stories of in-the-cockpit action, an amazing cast of characters, and all the drama and bravery of a man fighting a desperate war thousands of feet above the ground. An undeniable classic.

  • First Impressions: A Reader's Journey to Iconic Places of the American Southwest

    A guide to the history and culture of the American Southwest, as told through early encounters with fifteen iconic sites

    This unique guide for literate travelers in the American Southwest tells the story of fifteen iconic sites across Arizona, New Mexico, southern Utah, and southern Colorado through the eyes of the explorers, missionaries, and travelers who were the first non-natives to describe them. Noted borderlands historians David J. Weber and William deBuys lead readers through centuries of political, cultural, and ecological change.

    The sites visited in this volume range from popular destinations within the National Park System--including Carlsbad Caverns, the Grand Canyon, and Mesa Verde--to the Spanish colonial towns of Santa Fe and Taos and the living Indian communities of Acoma, Zuni, and Taos. Lovers of the Southwest, residents and visitors alike, will delight in the authors' skillful evocation of the region's sweeping landscapes, its rich Hispanic and Indian heritage, and the sense of discovery that so enchanted its early explorers.

    Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University

  • Biomechanical Transport Processes

    Papers related to the talks given at the European Mechanics Colloquium and NATO Workshop on the subjects of transport phenomena, blood vessels, and heart thermo-biophysical properties; arterial, valvular, ventricular, and venous flow; hemorheology and microcirculation; blood-wall interactions; and i"

  • Food Purchasing and Preparation

    This textbook contains comprehensive, practical information for students of catering, concentrating on the quantity, quality and standard of the commodities. It provides a study of this topic, including purchasing specifications, information on vegetarian alternatives, modern trends (such as warm salads) and healthy options, as well as traditional and international cooking.

  • Cassell Pocket Dictionary

    This dictionary incorporates useful features including usage notes and common misspellings. It also covers scientific, technical and specialist terms in addition to its core vocabulary of English.

  • Light in Biology and Medicine

    Almost all life depends on light for its survival. It is the ultimate basis for the food we eat (photosynthesis), and many organisms make use of it in basic sensory mechanisms for guiding their behaviour, be it through the complex process of vision, or by the relatively more simple photosens- itivity of microorganis urthermore, light has profound implications for the field of medicine, both as a cause of disease (ie UV damage of DNA), and as a therapeutic agent (ie photodynamic therapy). These and other processes are the basis for the science of photobiolog which could be defined as the study of the effects of (visible and ultraviolet) light (from both the sun and artificial sources) on living matter. By its very nature, therefore, it is a multidisciplinary science involving branches of biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. This book contains a selection of papers which have been chosen to highlight recent advances in the various disciplines that make up photo- biology. Although no book on photobiology can hope to be comprehensive, we hope that this volume includes a representative sample of much of what is new in the field. It is, however, inevitable that some areas will be better represented than others reflecting the biases of conference org- anisers and editors.

  • The Physics of Instabilities in Solid State Electron Devices

    The past three decades have been a period where useful current and voltage instabilities in solids have progressed from exciting research problems to a wide variety of commercially available devices. Materials and electronics research has led to devices such as the tunnel (Esaki) diode, transferred electron (Gunn) diode, avalanche diodes, real-space transfer devices, and the like. These structures have proven to be very important in the generation, amplification, switching, and processing of microwave signals up to frequencies exceeding 100 GHz. In this treatise we focus on a detailed theoretical understanding of devices of the kind that can be made unstable against circuit oscillations, large amplitude switching events, and in some cases, internal rearrangement of the electric field or current density distribution. The book is aimed at the semiconductor device physicist, engineer, and graduate student. A knowledge of solid state physics on an elementary or introductory level is assumed. Furthermore, we have geared the book to device engineers and physicists desirous of obtaining an understanding substantially deeper than that associated with a small signal equivalent circuit approach. We focus on both analytical and numerical treatment of specific device problems, concerning ourselves with the mechanism that determines the constitutive relation governing the device, the boundary conditions (contact effects), and the effect of the local circuit environment.

  • Organic Superconductivity

    This book contains papers presented at the International Conference on Organic Superconductivity which was held May 20-24, 1990, at the Stanford Sierra Conference Center, South Lake Tahoe, California. In the twenty years since the First Conference on Organic Superconductivity was held (Hawaii, 1969), there has been remarkable progress in the field. At present, development is accelerating with contributions from many groups in many countries worldwide. The discovery of high Tc superconductivity by G. Bednorz and K. Muller in 1986 and subsequent developments in the ceramic superconductors have had an enormous impact on the field of superconductivity as a whole. This discovery occurred in an area entirely different from that of conventional superconduc- tivity, underscoring the importance of the search for and study of novel materials of all kinds. We believe that the organics, with their wide range of structural, chemical, and physical properties, belong in this category of novel materials. This book reflects the efforts of researchers from various disciplines: physicists, chemists, and materials scientists. It addresses the normal and superconducting properties of organic materials, as well as the search for new compounds and new syntheses. We are pleased to note that one of these papers reports on the discovery of a new organic superconductor with a record high Tc in this class. One chapter is devoted to a comparison of organic superconductors and the cuprates, another, to the prospects of discovering other novel conducting or superconducting compounds.

  • Hieronymus Bosch, Painter and Draughtsman: Catalogue Raisonné

    Compiled by members of the Bosch Research and Conservation Project and published on the 500th anniversary of Hieronymus Bosch's death, this is the definitive new catalogue of all of Bosch's extant paintings and drawings. His mastery and genius have been redefined as a result of six years of research on the iconography, techniques, pedigree, and conservation history of his paintings and on his life. This stunning volume includes all new photography, as well as up-to-date research on the individual works. For the first time, the incredible creativity of this late medieval artist, expressed in countless details, is reproduced and discussed in this book. Special attention is being paid to Bosch as an image maker, a skilled draughtsman, and a brutal painter, changing the game of painting around 1500 by his innovative way of working.

  • Brewer's Dictionary of Names

    This dictionary reveals the origins of familiar names from personal names to place names, brand names to astronomical names. It includes a broad selection of names of animals, mythological and literary characters, sports teams, languages, nationalities, political parties and pop and rock groups. It takes in the name of holidays and festivals, of schools and colleges, of battles and revolutions, and of well-known individual buildings such as clubs, hospitals, country houses, museums and theatres. It includes the origins of the names of famous individuals from Caesar to Sophocles, Homer to Ho chi Min. Names of famous fictional characters are also represented, such as Shakespeare's Desdemona and Hamlet as well as Kipling's Mowgli and A.A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh. Equally present are the titles of literary works and musical compositions such as Lavengro and Lohengrin. It includes an introduction providing background to different aspects of name studies and research and includes a guide to nearly 100 languages used in the dictionary from Afrikaans to Zyrian with notes on accents and alphabets.

  • Andy Warhol: From a to B and Back Again

    "One of the most emulated and significant figures in modern art, Andy Warhol (1928-1987) rose to fame in the 1960s with his iconic Pop pieces. Warhol expanded the boundaries by which art is defined and created groundbreaking work in a diverse array of media that includes paintings, sculptures, prints, photographs, films, and installations.

    This ambitious book is the first to examine Warhol's work in its entirety. It builds on a wealth of new research and materials that have come to light in recent decades and offers a rare and much-needed comprehensive look at the full scope of Warhol's production - from his commercial illustrations of the 1950s through his monumental paintings of the 1980s. Donna De Salvo explores how Warhol's work engages with notions of public and private, the redefinition of media, and the role of abstraction, while a series of incisive and eye-opening essays by eminent scholars and contemporary artists touch on a broad range of topics, such as Warhol's response to the AIDS epidemic, his international influence, and how his work relates to constructs of self-image seen in social media today."

  • Giardia and Giardiasis: Biology, Pathogenesis, and Epidemiology

    The intestinal protozoan Giardia was first described over 300 years ago in 1681 by Leeuwenhoek, from his own stools. In his description of Giardia, he noted the size, movement, and morphology of the organism, and associated its presence with the diarrheic nature of his stools and his dietary habits. This truly remarkable account contains the first description of Giardia in morphologic, pathogenic, and epidemiologic terms. Our knowledge of the organisms in the genus Giardia has advanced tremendously in the past two decades. With the advent of new tech- nologies, including techniques in electron microscopy, biochemistry, immunochemistry, tissue culture, and physiology, a tidal wave of information has appeared on the organization and function of this parasitic protozoan and its interaction with its host. The purpose of this book is to celebrate the tricentennial discovery of Giardia by Leeuwenhoek by presenting the above-mentioned advances in our knowledge of Giardia and giardiasis. In the first section of this book, the dominant theme is the biology of the organism and the correlation of structure-function relationships.

  • Spelling

    Designed for teachers wanting to know what to do to help pupils with spelling difficulties, this book combines practical advice with theory, research and accounts of the author's own experience. The author looks at how spelling skills develop in both youn

  • New Instant Guide to Bridge: Acol Bids, Responses, Leads & Play

    Rixi Markus, one of the all-time great names in bridge said of this book: 'I found myself agreeing with almost everything in this useful reference book; anyone who learns all the rules set out here will have the makings of an ideal bridge partner.'
    Ron Klinger has brought the bidding methods up to date to accord with current standard practice and has included sections on hand evaluation and competitive bidding strategy.

  • Lipid and Biopolymer Monolayers at Liquid Interfaces

    During the past few decades, much research has been reported on the formation of insoluble monomolecular films of lipids and biopolymers (synthetic polymers and proteins) on the surface of water or at the oil-water interface. This interest arises from the fact that monomolecular film studies have been found to provide much useful information on a molecular scale, information that is useful for understanding many industrial and biological phenomena in chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical, medical, and food science applications. For instance, information obtained from lipid monolayer studies has been useful in determining the forces that are known to stabilize emulsions and biological cell membranes. The current texts on surface chemistry generally devote a single chapter to the characteristics of spread monolayers of lipids and biopolymers on liquids, and a researcher may have to review several hundred references to determine the procedures needed to investigate or analyze a particular phenomenon. Furthermore, there is an urgent need at this stage for a text that discusses the state of the art regarding the surface pheqomena exhibited by lipids and biopolymers, as they are relevant to a wide variety of surface and interfacial processes.

  • Recipes for Surfaces: Decorative Paint Finishes Made Simple

    This provides a step-by-step guide to decorative paint finishes for walls, floors, ceilings and furniture. It demonstrates effects to suit widely varied tastes and gives advice on the use of different shades and combinations of colour. Each "recipe" gives an equipment checklist, ingredients and workplan and the photographs demonstrate the effect of the techniques in different types of rooms.

  • One Hot Summer: Dickens, Darwin, Disraeli, and the Great Stink of 1858

    A unique, in-depth view of Victorian London during the record-breaking summer of 1858, when residents both famous and now-forgotten endured "The Great Stink" together

    While 1858 in London may have been noteworthy for its broiling summer months and the related stench of the sewage-filled Thames River, the year is otherwise little remembered. And yet, historian Rosemary Ashton reveals in this compelling microhistory, 1858 was marked by significant, if unrecognized, turning points. For ordinary people, and also for the rich, famous, and powerful, the months from May to August turned out to be a summer of consequence.

    Ashton mines Victorian letters and gossip, diaries, court records, newspapers, and other contemporary sources to uncover historically crucial moments in the lives of three protagonists--Charles Dickens, Charles Darwin, and Benjamin Disraeli. She also introduces others who gained renown in the headlines of the day, among them George Eliot, Karl Marx, William Thackeray, and Edward Bulwer Lytton. Ashton reveals invisible threads of connection among Londoners at every social level in 1858, bringing the celebrated city and its citizens vibrantly to life.

  • Noise and Nonlinear Phenomena in Nuclear Systems

    The main goal of the meeting was to facilitate and encourage the application of recent developments in the physical and mathematical sciences to the analysis of deterministic and stochastic processes in nuclear engineering. In contrast with the rapid growth (triggered by computer developments) of nonlinear analysis in other branches of the physical sciences, the theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors is still based on linearized models of the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic feedback loop, an approach that ignores some intrinsic nonlinearities of the real system. The subject of noise was added because of the importance of the noise technique in detecting abnormalities associated with perturbations of sufficient amplitude to generate nonlinear processes. Consequently the organizers of the meeting invited a group of leading researchers in the field of noise and nonlinear phenomena in nuclear systems to report on recent advances in their area of research. A selected subgroup of researchers in areas outside the reactor field provided enlightenment on new theoretical developments of immediate relevance to nuclear dynamics theory.

  • The Last Valley: Dien Bien Phu and the French Defeat in Vietnam

    Stalingrad in the jungle: the battle that doomed the French Empire and led America into Vietnam

    In winter 1953-54 the French army in Vietnam challenged its elusive enemy, General Giap's Viet Minh, to pitched battle. Ten thousand French paras and legionnaires, with artillery and tanks, were flown to the remote valley of Dien Bien Phu to build a fortress upon which Giap could smash his inexperienced regiments. The siege which followed became a Stalingrad in the jungle, and its outcome shocked the world.

  • Emma & Edvard Looking Sideways: Loneliness and the Cinematic

    In this compelling publication, two masters come face-to-face when the works of Edvard Munch are juxtaposed against Gustave Flaubert's groundbreaking novel Madame Bovary. Munch's art is presented in stills taken from an elaborate video installation, Madame B (2014), created by Michelle Williams Gamaker and the internationally acclaimed cultural theorist, video artist, and curator Mieke Bal. Emma and Edvard Looking Sideways: Loneliness and the Cinematic explores the filmic aspect of Munch's art by combining contemporary art theory with Bal's own idiosyncratic way of looking at art - directly and closely. The reader can reflect upon how we view each other in social situations and question what happens when we are denied visual dialogue.

  • The Racial Glass Ceiling: Subordination in American Law and Culture

    A compelling study of a subtle and insidious form of racial inequality in American law and culture.

    Why does racial equality continue to elude African Americans even after the election of a black president? Liberals blame white racism while conservatives blame black behavior. Both define the race problem in socioeconomic terms, mainly citing jobs, education, and policing. Roy Brooks, a distinguished legal scholar, argues that the reality is more complex. He defines the race problem African Americans face today as a three-headed hydra involving socioeconomic, judicial, and cultural conditions. Focusing on law and culture, Brooks defines the problem largely as racial subordination--"the act of impeding racial progress in pursuit of nonracist interests." Racial subordination is little understood and underacknowledged, yet it produces devastating and even deadly racial consequences that affect both poor and socioeconomically successful African Americans. Brooks addresses a serious problem, in many ways more dangerous than overt racism, and offers a well-reasoned solution that draws upon the strongest virtues America has exhibited to the world.

  • Käthe Kollwitz and the Women of War: Femininity, Identity, and Art in Germany During World Wars I and II

    The art of German printmaker and sculptor Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945) is famously empathetic; Kollwitz imbued her prints, drawings, and sculpture with eloquent and often painful commentary on the human condition, especially the horrors of war. This insightful book, the first English-language catalogue on Kollwitz in more than two decades, offers the singular opportunity to examine her work against the tumultuous backdrop of World Wars I and II. The societal cost of war became an enduring subject for Kollwitz after her youngest son died on the battlefield in Flanders in 1914. She dedicated much of the remainder of her career to creating images that questioned the efficacy of war, exposed its devastation, and promoted peace. The essays discuss the motifs she developed in this pursuit--young widows, grieving parents alongside maternal figures that serve as defenders, guardians, activists, and mourners--within the context of German visual culture from 1914 to 1945.

  • Writing Successful Science Proposals

    An authoritative how-to guide that explains every aspect of science proposal writing

    This fully revised edition of the authoritative guide to science proposal writing is an essential tool for any researcher embarking on a grant or thesis application. In accessible steps, the authors detail every stage of proposal writing, from conceiving and designing a project to analyzing data, synthesizing results, estimating a budget, addressing reviewer comments, and resubmitting. This new edition is updated to address changes and developments over the past decade, including identifying opportunities and navigating the challenging proposal-funding environment. The only how-to book of its kind, it includes exercises to help readers stay on track as they develop their grant proposals and is designed for those in the physical, life, environmental, biomedical, and social sciences, as well as engineering.

  • Delayed Response: The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World

    A celebration of waiting throughout history, and of its importance for connection, understanding, and intimacy in human communication

    We have always been conscious of the wait for life-changing messages, whether it be the time it takes to receive a text message from your love, for a soldier's family to learn news from the front, or for a space probe to deliver data from the far reaches of the solar system. In this book in praise of wait times, award-winning author Jason Farman passionately argues that the delay between call and answer has always been an important part of the message.

    Traveling backward from our current era of Twitter and texts, Farman shows how societies have worked to eliminate waiting in communication and how they have interpreted those times' meanings. Exploring seven eras and objects of waiting--including pneumatic mail tubes in New York, Elizabethan wax seals, and Aboriginal Australian message sticks--Farman offers a new mindset for waiting. In a rebuttal to the demand for instant communication, Farman makes a powerful case for why good things can come to those who wait.

  • Impact of Cardiac Surgery on the Quality of Life: Neurological and Psychological Aspects

    Georg Rodewald University of Hamburg Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany Allen E. Willner Hillside Hospital Glen Oaks, NY In contrast to the initial years of cardiac surgery (37 years ago), there is now increasing interest in cerebral protection. Rodewald [1] in 1978 was among the first to point out the surgeon's concern with "psychopathological problems" and Taylor [2] in 1989 stressed that" --- the awareness of the cerebral consequences of open heart surgery has risen considerably in recent years - - - " This book reviews the evidence for neurological, psychological, and neuropsycho- logical reactions to cardiac surgery. In previous studies one problem is that small samples of patients were studied with different measuring instruments so that it was difficult to ma e sense of inconsistent findings. Considerable controversy resulted with little ability to sort out discrepant findings. It appeared that a large multi- center study using uniform measures might help clarify the picture.

  • The Language of Light: A History of Silent Voices

    A comprehensive history of deafness, signed languages, and the unresolved struggles of the Deaf to be taught in their unspoken tongue

    Partially deaf due to a childhood illness, Gerald Shea is no stranger to the search for communicative grace and clarity. In this eloquent and thoroughly researched book, he uncovers the centuries-long struggle of the Deaf to be taught in sign language--the only language that renders them complete, fully communicative human beings. Shea explores the history of the deeply biased attitudes toward the Deaf in Europe and America, which illogically forced them to be taught in a language they could neither hear nor speak. As even A.G. Bell, a fervent oralist, admitted, sign language is "the quickest method of reaching the mind of a deaf child."

    Shea's research exposes a persistent but misguided determination among hearing educators to teach the Deaf orally, making the very faculty they lacked the principal instrument of their instruction. To forbid their education in sign language--the "language of light"--is to deny the Deaf their human rights, he concludes.

  • Black Banners of Isis: The Roots of the New Caliphate

    A medieval Islam historian's incisive portrait of ISIS, revealing the group's deep ideological and intellectual roots in the earliest days of Islam

    With tremendous speed, the Islamic State has moved from the margins to the center of life in the Middle East. Despite recent setbacks, its ability to conquer and retain huge swaths of territory has demonstrated its skillful tactical maneuvering, ambition, and staying power. Yet we still know too little about ISIS, particularly about its deeper ideology.

    In this eye-opening book, David J. Wasserstein offers a penetrating analysis of the movement, looking closely at the thousand-year-old form of Islamic apocalyptic messianism the group draws upon today. He shows how ISIS is not only a military and political movement but also, and primarily, a religious one with a coherent worldview, a patent strategy, and a clear goal: the re-creation of a medieval caliphate. Connecting the group's day-to-day activities and the writings and sayings of its leaders with the medieval Islamic past, Wasserstein provides an insightful and unprecedented perspective on the origins and aspirations of the Islamic State.

  • The Physics of Submicron Semiconductor Devices

    The papers contained in the volume represent lectures delivered as a 1983 NATO ASI, held at Urbino, Italy. The lecture series was designed to identify the key submicron and ultrasubmicron device physics, transport, materials and contact issues. Nonequilibrium transport, quantum transport, interfacial and size constraints issues were also highlighted. The ASI was supported by NATO and the European Research Office. H. L. Grubin D. K. Ferry C. Jacoboni v CONTENTS MODELLING OF SUB-MICRON DEVICES.................. .......... 1 E. Constant BOLTZMANN TRANSPORT EQUATION... ... ...... .................... 33 K. Hess TRANSPORT AND MATERIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR SUBMICRON DEVICES. . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .... ... .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 45 H. L. Grubin EPITAXIAL GROWTH FOR SUB MICRON STRUCTURES.................. 179 C. E. C. Wood INSULATOR/SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACES.......................... 195 C. W. Wilms en THEORY OF THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES AND INTERFACES......................................... 223 C. Calandra DEEP LEVELS AT COMPOUND-SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACES........... 253 W. Monch ENSEMBLE MONTE CARLO TECHNIqUES............................. 289 C. Jacoboni NOISE AND DIFFUSION IN SUBMICRON STRUCTURES................. 323 L. Reggiani SUPERLATTICES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 . . . . . . . . . . . . K. Hess SUBMICRON LITHOGRAPHY 373 C. D. W. Wilkinson and S. P. Beaumont QUANTUM EFFECTS IN DEVICE STRUCTURES DUE TO SUBMICRON CONFINEMENT IN ONE DIMENSION.... ....................... 401 B. D. McCombe vii viii CONTENTS PHYSICS OF HETEROSTRUCTURES AND HETEROSTRUCTURE DEVICES..... 445 P. J. Price CORRELATION EFFECTS IN SHORT TIME, NONS TAT I ONARY TRANSPORT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477 . . . . . . . . . . . . J. J. Niez DEVICE-DEVICE INTERACTIONS............ ...................... 503 D. K. Ferry QUANTUM TRANSPORT AND THE WIGNER FUNCTION................... 521 G. J. Iafrate FAR INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF VELOCITY OVERSHOOT AND HOT ELECTRON DYNAMICS IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES............. 577 S. J. Allen, Jr.

  • Devotion

    The National Book Award-winning author of Year of the Monkey, Just Kids, and M Train offers a rare, intimate account of her own creative process.

    A work of creative brilliance may seem like magic--its source a mystery, its impact unexpectedly stirring. How does an artist accomplish such an achievement, connecting deeply with an audience never met? In this groundbreaking book, one of our culture's beloved artists offers a detailed account of her own creative process, inspirations, and unexpected connections.

    Patti Smith first presents an original and beautifully crafted tale of obsession--a young skater who lives for her art, a possessive collector who ruthlessly seeks his prize, a relationship forged of need both craven and exalted. She then takes us on a second journey, exploring the sources of her story. We travel through the South of France to Camus's house, and visit the garden of the great publisher Gallimard where the ghosts of Mishima, Nabokov, and Genet mingle. Smith tracks down Simone Weil's grave in a lonely cemetery, hours from London, and winds through the nameless Paris streets of Patrick Modiano's novels. Whether writing in a cafe or a train, Smith generously opens her notebooks and lets us glimpse the alchemy of her art and craft in this arresting and original book on writing.

    The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham-Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University.

  • Fourier Techniques and Applications

    The first systematic methods of Fourier analysis date from the early eighteenth century with the work of Joseph Fourier on the problem of the flow of heat. (A brief history is contained in the first paper.) Given the initial tempera- ture at all points of a region, the problem was to determine the changes in the temperature distribution over time. Understanding and predicting these changes was important in such areas as the handling of metals and the determination of geological and atmospheric temperatures. Briefly, Fourier noticed that the solution of the heat diffusion problem was simple if the initial temperature dis- tribution was sinusoidal. He then asserted that any distri- bution can be decomposed into a sum of sinusoids, these being the harmonics of the original function. This meant that the general solution could now be obtained by summing the solu- tions of the component sinusoidal problems. This remarkable ability of the series of sinusoids to describe all "reasonable" functions, the sine qua non of Fourier analysis and synthesis, has led to the routine use of the methods originating with Fourier in a great diversity of areas - astrophysics, computing, economics, electrical engineering, geophysics, information theory, medical engineering, optics, petroleum and mineral exploration, quan- tum physics and spectroscopy, to name a few.

  • Brewer's Rogues, Villians & Eccentrics: An A-Z of Roguish Britons Through the Ages

    Taking its inspiration from the Brewer's tradition of recording unexpected and fascinating information that is not generally available in other reference books, 'Brewer's Rogues, Villains and Eccentrics' presents a colourful, informative and entertaining A-Z of bizarre Britons through the ages: assassins and arsonists, buggers and bigamists, hangmen and horse-stealers, hell-raisers and highwaymen, plus an array of poisoners, quacks, forgers and others. Yesterday's whoremasters and harlots rub shoulders with the defrocked parsons and dodgy geezers of contemporary Brtain in this richly entertaining dictionary of degradation, depravity and dottiness. A rich repository of arcane but fascinating information, it will make the perfect Christmas present for anyone who loves history, biography and 'Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable'.

  • Achtung Panzer!

    This is one of the most significant military books of the twentieth century. By an outstanding soldier of independent mind, it pushed forward the evolution of land warfare and was directly responsible for German armoured supremacy in the early years of the Second World War.

    Published in 1937, the result of 15 years of careful study since his days on the German General Staff in the First World War, Achtung Panzer! argues how vital the proper use of tanks and supporting armoured vehicles would be in the conduct of a future war. When that war came, just two years later, he proved it, leading his Panzers with distinction in the Polish, French and Russian campaigns. Panzer warfare had come of age, exactly as he had forecast.This first English translation of Heinz Guderian's classic book - used as a textbook by Panzer officers in the war - has an introduction and extensive background notes by the modern English historian Paul Harris.

  • Fundamentals of Adhesion

    The first of two volumes explaining most aspects of adhesion and adhesive bonding. Volume one focuses on adhesion with or without the use of an adhesive and the mechanisms of bond formation; volume two, Adhesive bonding, will cover adhesives and the forming and breaking of bonds. The 15 individuall

  • Computer Vision for Electronic Manufacturing

    DEFECT PROPORTION OF DETECTION INITIAL RATE DETECTION RATE INSPECTOR 3 COMPLEXITY OF TIMES PAN OF PERFORMING o ________________________ o ______________________ __ -;. INSPECTION TASK -;. VISUAL INSPECTION Fagure 1. Trends in relations between the complexity of inspection tasks, defect detection rates (absolute and relative), and inspection time. Irrespective of the necessities described above, and with the excep- tion of specific generic application systems (e.g., bare-board PCB inspection, wafer inspection, solder joint inspection, linewidth measure- ment), vision systems are still not found frequently in today's electronics factories. Besides cost, some major reasons for this absence are: 1. The detection robustness or accuracy is still insufficient. 2. The total inspection time is often too high, although this can frequently be attributed to mechanical handling or sensing. 3. There are persistent gaps among process engineers, CAD en- gineers, manufacturing engineers, test specialists, and computer vision specialists, as problems dominate the day-to-day interac- tions and prevent the establishment of trust. 4. Computer vision specialists sometimes still believe that their contributions are universal, so that adaptation to each real problem becomes tedious, or stumbles over the insufficient availabIlity of multidisciplinary expertise. Whether we like it or not, we must still use appropriate sensors, lighting, and combina- tions of algorithms for each class of applications; likewise, we cannot design mechanical handling, illumination, and sensing in isolation from each other.

  • Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light

    A long-overdue publication that restores Wilfred to the art-historical canon

    Lumia presents a long-overdue reevaluation of the groundbreaking artist Thomas Wilfred (1889-1968), whose unprecedented works prefigured light art in America. As early as 1919, many years before the advent of consumer television and video technology, Wilfred began experimenting with light as his primary artistic medium, developing the means to control and project unique compositions of colorful, undulating light forms, which he referred to collectively as lumia. Manifested as both live performances on a cinematic scale and self-contained structures, Wilfred's innovative displays captivated audiences and influenced generations of artists to come. This publication, the first dedicated to Wilfred in over forty years, draws on the artist's personal archives and includes a number of insightful essays that trace the development of his work and its relation to his cultural milieu. Featuring a foreword by the celebrated artist James Turrell, Lumia helps to secure Wilfred's rightful place within the canon of modern art.

  • Corita Kent and the Language of Pop

    A definitive exploration of Corita Kent's art, looking beyond her identity as a radical nun to establish her place amid the vibrant pop art movement of the 1960s

    Known widely as a Catholic nun with an avant-garde flair, Corita Kent (1918-1986) has a personal legacy that has tended to overshadow her extensive career as an artist. This handsomely illustrated catalogue places Kent in her rightful position among the foremost figures of pop art, such as Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, and Roy Lichtenstein. Although Kent has been largely excluded from the academic and critical discourses surrounding 1960s American art, this publication reevaluates her importance and highlights how her work questioned and expanded the boundaries of the pop art movement.

    Four essays and nearly 90 catalogue entries pull together a variety of topics--art history, religion, politics, linguistics, race, gender, mass media, and advertising--that influenced Kent's life and work during the 1960s. Eminent pop scholars delve into the relationship between her art and that of her contemporaries, and explore how her art both responded to and advanced the changes in modern-day Catholicism stemming from Vatican II. More than 200 vibrant images showcase Kent's ingenious screenprints, which often combine handwritten text and commercial imagery. Offering an unparalleled, rigorous study of an artist who has been largely overlooked, this book is an important contribution to scholarship as well as a fascinating presentation of Kent and her work to a wider audience.

  • Einstein's Dream

    Thirty years ago Albert Einstein died, his dream of a theory that would unify the universe unfulfilled. He spent the last decades of his life searching for such a theory-a theory that would explain everything from elementary particles and their interac- tions to the overall structure of the universe. But he failed, not because he didn't try hard enough, but because the attempt was ahead of its time. When Einstein worked on the problem liter- ally nothing was known about black holes, white holes, sin- gularities, the Big Bang explosion and the early universe, quarks, gauge invariance, and weak and strong nuclear forces. Today we know that all these things are important in relation to a unified theory, and that they must be incorporated in and explained by such a theory. Thus, in a sense, our problem is much more complex today than it was in Einstein's day. But scientists have persevered and as a result we are now tan- talizingly close to achieving this long-sought goal. Important breakthroughs have been made. In this book we will look at these breakthroughs and at recent unified theories-theories that go by the names supergravity, superstrings, GUTs, and twistor theory. In order to understand the problem, however, we must begin at the beginning.

  • Improve Your Bidding and Play

    Here is a new edition of this exhilarating and ingeniously laid out guide to improving both your bidding and play. Sixty hands are presented and you must first find the key bid. Then, as declarer, you have to work out the best way to play the hand. By the time you have completed the sixty problems you will undoubtedly be a much improved player.

  • American Impressionist: Childe Hassam and the Isles of Shoals

    An exploration of the fascinating connections between the Isles of Shoals and the beautiful paintings that Childe Hassam created there

    Childe Hassam (1859-1935) was the foremost American impressionist of his generation. Prolific in oil paintings and watercolors, he found his native New England to be a touchstone for his art. Hassam had a fascination with Appledore, the largest island of the Isles of Shoals off the coast of Maine and New Hampshire, and he traveled there almost every summer for thirty years.

    This fascinating book traces Hassam's artistic exploration of Appledore and reveals a complex portrait of the island created over time. John W. Coffey, working with the marine biologist Hal Weeks, revisits Hassam's painting sites, identifying where, what, and how the artist painted on the island. Kathleen M. Burnside considers the range of the artist's stylistic responses to the island's nature. A photo essay by Alexandra de Steiguer reveals Appledore's enduring beauty.

  • Advances in X-Ray Analysis

    The 37th Annual Denver Conference on Applications of X-Ray Analysis was held August 1-5, 1988, at the Sheraton Steamboat Resort and Conference Center, Steamboat Springs, Colorado. As usual, alternating with x-ray diffraction, the emphasis this year was x-ray fluorescence, but as has been the pattern for several occasions over the last few years, the Plenary Session did not deal with that subject, specifically. In an attempt to introduce the audience to one of the new developments in x-ray analysis, the title of the session was "High Brilliance Sources/Applications," and dealt exclusively with synchrotron radiation, a topic which has made a very large impact on the x-ray community over the last decade. As the organizer and co-chairman of the Plenary Session (with Paul Predecki), it is my responsibility to report on that session here. The Conference had the privilege of obtaining the services of some of the preeminent practitioners of research using this remarkable x-ray source; they presented the audience with unusually lucid descriptions of the work which has been accomplished in the development and application of the continuous, high intensity, tunable, polarized and collimated x-rays available from no facility other than these specialized storage rings. The opening lecture (and I use that term intentionally) was an enthusiastic description of "What is Synchrotron Radiation?" by Professor Boris Batterman of Cornell University and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Sourc(! (CHESS).

  • How to Plan Direct Mail

    This series provides an introduction to advertising in four key media. Written for managers using these media for the first time, each book is a practical guide to planning, preparing, running and evaluating a campaign in a particular medium. The books are supported throughout by real documents such as rate cards and winning advertisements. Codes of practice, useful contacts and recommended reading sections plus a glossary of important words and phrases are included in each book.

  • Paintings at the Art Institute of Chicago: Highlights of the Collection

    An updated selection of key paintings at the Art Institute of Chicago, featuring works from around the globe and dating from ancient Egypt to the present day

    The Art Institute of Chicago, one of the most beloved and important museums in the world, houses an extraordinary collection of objects from diverse places, cultures, and time periods. This beautiful catalogue opens the doors of the museum to readers, presenting an expansive selection of painted works from around the globe, introduced insightfully by James Rondeau, president and director of the Art Institute. New color photography accompanies entries written by a team of curators, art historians, and educators, which put the works into context. The book showcases a dazzling range of paintings, including an Egyptian funeral portrait, an ancient Mexican wall mural, Chinese scroll paintings, Japanese painted screens, and works by artists such as Caillebotte, Cassatt, El Greco, Gauguin, Homer, Hopper, Johns, Lichtenstein, Matisse, Mitsuoki, Monet, Morisot, Motley, O'Keeffe, Picasso, Pollock, Rembrandt, Richter, Rubens, Sargent, Seurat, Tiepolo, Turner, Van Gogh, Warhol, Whistler, and Wood; contemporary artists featured include Kerry James Marshall, Wanda Pimentel, and Kazuo Shiraga.

  • Environmental Dispute Resolution

    This book has its origins in an M.I.T. research project that was funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Our immediate objective was to prepare a set of case studies that examined bargaining and negotiation as they occurred between government, environmental advocates, and regulatees throughout the traditional regulatory process. The project was part of a larger effort by the EPA to make environmental regulation more efficient and less litigious. The principal investigator for the research effort was Lawrence Sus- skind of the Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Eight case studies were prepared under the joint supervision of Susskind and the authors of this book. Studying the negotiating behavior of parties as we worked our way through an environmental dispute proved enlightening. We observed missed oppor- tunities for settlement, negotiating tactics that backfired, and strategies that ap- peared to be grounded more in intuition than in thoughtful analysis. At the same time, however, we were struck by how often the parties ultimately managed to muddle through. People negotiated not out of some idealistic commitment to consensus but because they thought it better served their own interests. When some negotiations reached an impasse, people improvised mediation. These disputants succeeded in spite of legal and institutional barriers, even though few of them had a sophisticated understanding of negotiation.

  • Bacteria in Nature: Methods and Special Applications in Bacterial Ecology

    Any branch of biology depends for its progress on the development of new concepts and to a lesser, but sometimes crucial, extent on the elimination of erroneous notions. Understanding the roles of bacteria required first the observation that such minute creatures existed, and subsequently the exper imental demonstrations that their presence was necessary for the occurrence of particular phenomena. In this first volume, the authors review the development of scientific understanding of the role of microbes as agents of diverse natural processes. Notably absent is a separate review of the history of microbes as agents of disease, a his tory available in many other publications. Regrettably absent is a review of the his tory of microbes as agents of inorganic transformations, a serious omission that resulted from the illness of the prospective author late in the preparation of this volume. The topic will of course be treated in later volumes, although not predominantly in a historical manner. Otherwise, the emphasis in this volume is on the history of understanding interrelationships between modes of bacterial existence and the inanimate environment. These relationships were established long be fore multicellular, differentiated or ganisms appeared as potential microbial habitats, and their recognition and elucidation contributed greatly to the widened appreciation of bacterial di versity and the importance of these simpler creatures to the physiochemical conditions of the biosphere."

  • Acoustical Imaging

    This book contains the technical papers presented at the 16th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging which was held in Chicago, Illinois USA from June 10-12, 1987. This meeting has long been a leading forum for acoustic imaging scientists and engineers to meet and exchange ideas from a wide range of disciplines. As evidenced by the diversity of topical groups into which the papers are organized, participants at the meeting and readers of this volume can benefit from developments in medical imaging, materials testing, mathematics, microsocopy and seismic exploration. A common denominator in this field, as its name implies, is the generation, display, manipulation and analysis of images made with mechanical wave energy. Sound waves respond to the elastic properties of the medium through which they propagate, and as such, are capable of characterizing that medium; something that cannot be done by other means. It is astonishing to realize that acoustic wave imaging is commonly performed over about eight decades of frequency, with seismology and microscopy serving as lower and upper bounds, respectively. The physics is the same, but the implementations are quite different and there is much to learn. The conference chairman and editor wishes to express his appreciation to those who helped run the symposium - namely the Technical Review COIIII1ttee and Session Cbair: aen including Floyd Dunn, Gordon S

  • The White Rabbit

    The harrowing, and inspiring, story of the capture of one of Britain's top SOE agents in World War Two, his refusal to crack under the most horrific torture, and his final imprisonment in a concentration camp.

    'The White Rabbit' was the code name of Wing Commander F.F.E. Yeo-Thomas when he parachuted into France in 1942 as a member of the Special Operations Executive with the Resistance. For the next eighteen months he was responsible for organising all the separate factions of the French Resistance into one combined 'secret army'. On three separate missions into occupied France he met with the heads of Resistance movements all over the country, and he spoke personally with Winston Churchill in order to ensure they were properly supplied.

    His capture by the Gestapo in March 1944 was therefore a terrible blow for the Resistance movement. For months he was submitted to the most horrific torture in an attempt to get him to spill his unparalleled knowledge of the Resistance, but he refused to crack. Finally he was sentenced to death, and sent to Buchenwald, one of the most infamous German concentration camps. The story of his endurance, and survival, is an inspiring study in the triumph of the human spirit over the most terrible adversity.

  • Brewer's Britain & Ireland

    Pick any spot in the British Isles and you're sure to find a touch of local color, as this authoritative guide so entertainingly demonstrates. The authors have selected 7,500 of the most interesting places and place-names, from Ashby-de-la-Zouch (scene of "Ivanhoe"'s unforgettable joust), to Wetwang, where builders recently discovered the 2,300-year-old grave of an Iron Age woman who was buried with a chariot. Tourists, scholars, and armchair travelers will revel in fascinating facts on everything from what's odd about the name "Avon River" to why Brits say "God bless the Duke of Argyle!" when someone scratches an itch.

  • 100 Winning Duplicate Tips: For the Improving Tournament Player

    Many competent players are frustrated by an apparent inability to score well at duplicate pairs. No matter how hard they try, the secret of success seems to lie forever beyond reach. The truth is that playing good bridge is not enough to win at pairs. The regular winners are those who have learned to adapt their strategy to take account of the vagaries of match-point scoring. A small shift in emphasis can make a big difference to results.

    In this book Australian expert Ron Klinger shows you how to do it. There are five sections covering constructive bidding, competitive bidding, opening leads, declarer play and defence, and they are full of well-chosen example hands and sound advice. Put these tips into practice and your results are sure to improve.

  • Sharing Expertise In Teacher Ed

    A commentary on changes in the initial and continuing education of teachers. The authors combine reviews of the available literature with research and offer suggestions as to how teacher education may be improved. Also included is a comparative research project on teacher education in the Usa.

  • The Spanish Resurgence, 1713-1748

    A major reassessment of Philip V's leadership and what it meant for the modern Spanish state

    Often dismissed as ineffective, indolent, and dominated by his second wife, Philip V of Spain (1700-1746), the first Bourbon king, was in fact the greatest threat to peace in Europe during his reign. Under his rule, Spain was a dynamic force and expansionist power, especially in the Mediterranean world. Campaigns in Italy and North Africa revitalized Spanish control in the Mediterranean region, and the arrival of the Bourbon dynasty signaled a sharp break from Habsburg attitudes and practices. Challenging long-held understandings of early eighteenth-century Europe and the Atlantic world, Christopher Storrs draws on a rich array of primary documents to trace the political, military, and financial innovations that laid the framework for the modern Spanish state and the coalescence of a national identity. Storrs illuminates the remarkable revival of Spanish power after 1713 and sheds new light on the often underrated king who made Spain's resurgence possible.

  • Prediction of Protein Structure and the Principles of Protein Conformation

    The prediction of the conformation of proteins has developed from an intellectual exercise into a serious practical endeavor that has great promise to yield new stable enzymes, products of pharmacological significance, and catalysts of great potential. With the application of predic- tion gaining momentum in various fields, such as enzymology and immunology, it was deemed time that a volume be published to make available a thorough evaluation of present methods, for researchers in this field to expound fully the virtues of various algorithms, to open the field to a wider audience, and to offer the scientific public an opportunity to examine carefully its successes and failures. In this manner the practitioners of the art could better evaluate the tools and the output so that their expectations and applications could be more realistic. The editor has assembled chapters by many of the main contributors to this area and simultaneously placed their programs at three national resources so that they are readily available to those who wish to apply them to their personal interests. These algorithms, written by their originators, when utilized on pes or larger computers, can instantaneously take a primary amino acid sequence and produce a two-or three-dimensional artistic image that gives satisfaction to one's esthetic sensibilities and food for thought concerning the structure and function of proteins. It is in this spirit that this volume was envisaged.

  • Martin Luther: Visionary Reformer

    A fresh account of the life of Martin Luther

    The sixteenth-century German friar whose public conflict with the medieval Roman Church triggered the Protestant Reformation, Martin Luther was neither an unblemished saint nor a single-minded religious zealot according to this provocative new biography by Scott Hendrix. The author presents Luther as a man of his time: a highly educated scholar and teacher and a gifted yet flawed human being driven by an optimistic yet ultimately unrealized vision of "true religion."

    This bold, insightful account of the life of Martin Luther provides a new perspective on one of the most important religious figures in history, focusing on Luther's entire life, his personal relationships and political motivations, rather than on his theology alone. Relying on the latest research and quoting extensively from Luther's correspondence, Hendrix paints a richly detailed portrait of an extraordinary man who, while devout and courageous, had a dark side as well. No recent biography in English explores as fully the life and work of Martin Luther long before and far beyond the controversial posting of his 95 Theses in 1517, an event that will soon be celebrated as the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

  • Data Analysis in Astronomy III

    In the book are reported the main results presented at the Third International Workshop on Data Analysis in Astronomy, held at the EUore Majorana Center for Scientific Culture, Erice, Sicily, Italy, on June 20-27,1988. The Workshop was the natural evolution of the two previous ones. The main goal of the first edition (Erice 1984) was to start a scientific interaction between Astronomers and Computer Scientists. Aim of the second (Erice 1986) was to look at the progress in data analysis methods and dedicated hardware technology. Data analysis problems become harder whenever the data are poor in statistics or the signal is weak and embedded in structured background. Experiments collecting data of such a nature require new and non-standard methodologies. Possibilistic approaches could be merged with the statistical ones, in order to formalize all the knowledge used by the scientists to reach conclusions. Moreover, the last decade has been characterized by very fast developments of Intelligent Systems for data analysis (knowledge based systems, ... ) that would be useful to support astronomers in complex decision making. For these reasons, the last edition of the workshop was intended to provide an overview on the state of the art in the data analysis methodologies and tools in the new frontieres of the astrophysics (y-astronomy, neutrino astronomy, gravitational waves, background radiation and extreme cosmic ray energy spectrum). The book is organized in two sections: - Data analysis methods and tools, - New frontieres in astronomy.

  • Burn Out: The Endgame for Fossil Fuels

    An energy revolution is under way with far-reaching consequences for nations, companies, and the way we address climate change Low oil prices are sending shockwaves through the global economy, and longtime industry observer Dieter Helm explains how this and other shifts are the harbingers of a coming energy revolution and how the fossil fuel age will come to an end. Surveying recent surges in technological innovations, Helm's provocative new book documents how the global move toward the internet-of-things will inexorably reduce the demand for oil, gas, and renewables-and prove more effective than current efforts to avert climate change. Oil companies and energy utilities must begin to adapt their existing business models or face future irrelevancy. Oil-exporting nations, particularly in the Middle East, will be negatively impacted, whereas the United States and European countries that are investing in new technologies may find themselves leaders in the geopolitical game. Timely and controversial, this book concludes by offering advice on what governments and businesses can and should do now to prepare for a radically different energy future.

  • European Art: A Neuroarthistory

    A bold revision of the history of European art, told through the lens of neuroscience

    Ambitious and much anticipated, this book celebrates the value of recent neuroscientific discoveries as tools for art-historical analysis. Case studies ranging across the whole history of European art demonstrate the relationships between forms of visual expression and the objects of visual attention, emotional connection, and intellectual interest in daily life, thus illuminating the previously hidden meanings of many artistic styles and conventions. Art historians have until now concentrated on the conscious intentions of artists and patrons, but neuroscience provides insights into the role of non-conscious mental processes in the production and consumption of works of art. As John Onians powerfully argues, these insights have the potential to revolutionize cultural history. For the first time, an authority renowned for a more traditional approach has applied new neuroscientific knowledge to a wide range of art-historical problems, both familiar and fresh. The result is a provocative, original, and persuasive case for neuroscience as an aid to research in the humanities.

  • The Power Of Shape

    Average players tend to focus on point count for their bidding decisions, but the expert recognises that the shape of the hand also plays a vital role. Knowing the implications of shape will help you find the best contract more often, and will also strengthen your play and defence by revealing the pattern of the opponents? hands.

    Make use of this valuable information by following the recommendations in this exciting and original book and your partnership will be in great shape!

  • Image Recognition by Holography

    A systematic account of the current status of holographic recognition systems, including their theory, principles of construction, and applications. Discusses statistical image recognition methods, optical data processing, principles of holographic correlator construction, holographic character read

  • Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology

    The present volume in our annual review series reviews a wide range of developments, giving a broad interpretation to the "technology" of our title. Starting at the beginning, Science, we have the review of basic nuclear physics data of Walker and Weaver for reactor kinetics, particularly, there- fore, delayed neutron data. In the search for better and better accuracy, it is being realized that this involves the closest scrutiny of fundamental data, given to us here from the Birmingham school. Associated with this review of data is the review from Italy by Professor Pacilio and his co- workers of the theory of reactor kinetics in the stochastic form, and a valuable compilation of the theory underlying a wide range of practical techniques. Tending more to technology come the papers by Jervis, reviewing the application of digital computers to the control of large nuclear power stations as developed in both the united Kingdom and Canada, Pickman's review of the design of fuels for heavy water reactors, and the account by Ishi- kawa and Inabe of the new Japanese Research Reactor Program, itself initially directed largely to fuel element studies. The balance of the volume is made up of more philoso- phical contributions to the practicalities of nuclear power.

  • Think Tank: Forty Neuroscientists Explore the Biological Roots of Human Experience

    A spirited collection of essays by cutting-edge neuroscientists that irreverently explores the quirky and counterintuitive aspects of brain function

    Neuroscientist David J. Linden approached leading brain researchers and asked each the same question: "What idea about brain function would you most like to explain to the world?" Their responses make up this one-of-a-kind collection of popular science essays that seeks to expand our knowledge of the human mind and its possibilities. The contributors, whose areas of expertise include human behavior, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, and comparative anatomy, address a host of fascinating topics ranging from personality to perception, to learning, to beauty, to love and sex. The manner in which individual experiences can dramatically change our brains' makeup is explored.

    Professor Linden and his contributors open a new window onto the landscape of the human mind and into the cutting-edge world of neuroscience with a fascinating and enlightening compilation that science enthusiasts and professionals alike will find accessible and enjoyable.

  • Life After Faith - The Case for Secular Humanism

    A positive assessment of secularism and the possibilities it offers for a genuinely meaningful life without religion

    Although there is no shortage of recent books arguing against religion, few offer a positive alternative--how anyone might live a fulfilling life without the support of religious beliefs. This enlightening book fills the gap. Philip Kitcher constructs an original and persuasive secular perspective, one that answers human needs, recognizes the objectivity of values, and provides for the universal desire for meaningfulness.

    Kitcher thoughtfully and sensitively considers how secularism can respond to the worries and challenges that all people confront, including the issue of mortality. He investigates how secular lives compare with those of people who adopt religious doctrines as literal truth, as well as those who embrace less literalistic versions of religion. Whereas religious belief has been important in past times, Kitcher concludes that evolution away from religion is now essential. He envisions the successors to religious life, where the senses of identity and community traditionally fostered by religion will instead draw on a broader range of cultural items--those provided by poets, filmmakers, musicians, artists, scientists, and others. With clarity and deep insight, Kitcher reveals the power of secular humanism to encourage fulfilling human lives built on ethical truth.

  • Cassell Careers Encyclopedia

    This volume aims to provide a comprehensive guide to careers, explaining entry routes, qualifications and training. It also includes statistics on underlying trends of employment, offering a picture of future prospects. This edition reflects the increased importance of European opportunities and of information technology within the careers field. It also makes an assessment of the impact of recent demographic change. The main body of the book contains coverage of particular careers grouped in broad areas such as commerce, information technology, administration and finance, central and local government and service industries. This edition has been reorganized into CLCI (Careers Library Classification Index) order. In addition, this edition has expanded coverage of the world of work, working outside the UK, opportunities in Europe and information technology and computer work. There are also new sections on careers for people with special needs and career opportunities for women. It also has a new page design and is in an enlarged format.

  • Classics for the Masses: Shaping Soviet Musical Identity Under Lenin and Stalin

    Musicologist Pauline Fairclough explores the evolving role of music in shaping the cultural identity of the Soviet Union in a revelatory work that counters certain hitherto accepted views of an unbending, unchanging state policy of repression, censorship, and dissonance that existed in all areas of Soviet artistic endeavor. Newly opened archives from the Leninist and Stalinist eras have shed new light on Soviet concert life, demonstrating how the music of the past was used to help mold and deliver cultural policy, how "undesirable" repertoire was weeded out during the 1920s, and how Russian and non-Russian composers such as Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Wagner, Bach, and Rachmaninov were "canonized" during different, distinct periods in Stalinist culture. Fairclough's fascinating study of the ever-shifting Soviet musical-political landscape identifies 1937 as the start of a cultural Cold War, rather than occurring post-World War Two, as is often maintained, while documenting the efforts of musicians and bureaucrats during this period to keep musical channels open between Russia and the West.

  • TR Ericsson - Crackle & Drag

    This is the first monograph dedicated to contemporary artist TR Ericsson (b. 1972), who with conceptual rigor and emotional directness uses the archives chronicling his family's painful past to explore the healing powers of commemoration and memory. He grapples with these archival materials' power to define both the past and future, even as they vanish slowly with time. In a poignant family chronology in text and images, Ericsson includes many photographs of his mother--whose suicide at age 57 was a traumatic turning point in his life and career--along with related photographs, documents, writings, film stills, and artifacts dating back to the 1930s. Two scholarly essays set Ericsson's work into its artistic and broader cultural context. The complete publication is both a guide to the artist's work and an inspired chronicle of several generations of a Midwestern family, evoking universal themes of love and loss.

  • In Pursuit of Civility: Manners and Civilization in Early Modern England

    What did it mean to be `civilized' in Early Modern England? Keith Thomas's seminal studies Religion and the Decline of Magic, Man and the Natural World, and The Ends of Life, explored the beliefs, values and social practices of the years between 1500 and 1800. In Pursuit of Civility continues this quest by examining what the English people thought it meant to be `civilized' and how that condition differed from being `barbarous' or `savage' . Thomas shows how the upper ranks of society sought to distinguish themselves from their social inferiors by developing distinctive forms of moving, speaking and comporting themselves - and how the common people in turn developed their own forms of civility. The belief of the English in their superior civility shaped their relations with the Welsh, the Scots and the Irish. By legitimising international trade, colonialism, slavery, and racial discrimination, it was fundamental to their dealings with the native peoples of North America, India, and Australia.

    Yet not everyone shared this belief in the superiority of Western civilization. In Pursuit of Civility throws light on the early origins of anti-colonialism and cultural relativism, and goes on to examine some of the ways in which the new forms of civility were resisted. With all the author's distinctive authority and brilliance - based as ever on wide reading, abounding in fresh insights, and illustrated by many striking quotations and anecdotes from contemporary sources - In Pursuit of Civility transforms our understanding of the past. In so doing, it raises important questions as to the role of manners in the modern world.

  • Cassell's Flora: An Encyclopaedia of Plants

    This comprehensive, beautifully illustrated encyclopaedia of plants contains information on over 20,000 plants from around the world. The volume is organized alphabetically by botanical name, and each entry provides a detailed description of the plant, notes on its origin, cultivation requirements, growth habits, propagation and the pests and diseases to which it is prone. The introduction, by Tony Lord, explains the workings of the world's 12 climatic zones, and explores the environments of, and the plants that grow in, these zones. It also provides helpful lists of plants suitable for growing in specific areas and provides a plethora of exciting ideas for garden design. Written by a team of international botanical and horticultural experts, Flora will allow all gardeners to choose the perfect plants for their garden, and expand their knowledge of the wealth of plants available. The stunning colour photography - most of it featuring the plants in their natural habitat - is the perfect complement to the uniquely comprehensive text.

  • God Is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth - Light in Islamic Art and Culture

    The Qur'an makes rich references to light, tying it to revelation, and light consequently permeates the culture and visual arts of the Islamic lands. God Is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth explores the integral role of light in Islamic civilization across a wide range of media, from the Qur'an and literature to buildings, paintings, performances, photography, and other works produced over the past 14 centuries. A team of international experts conveys current scholarship on Islamic art in a manner that is engaging and accessible to the general reader. The objects discussed include some of the first identifiable works of Islamic art--modest oil lamps inscribed in Arabic, which developed into elaborately decorated metal and glass lamps and chandeliers. Later, photography, which creates images with light, was readily adopted in Islamic lands, and it continues to provide inspiration for contemporary artists. Generously illustrated with specially commissioned, sumptuous color photographs, this book shows the potential of light to reveal color, form, and meaning.

  • Modigliani Unmasked

    An illuminating study of Amedeo Modigliani's early drawings and how they reflect the artist's conception of identity

    One of the great artists of the 20th century, Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) is celebrated for revolutionizing modern portraiture, particularly in his later paintings and sculpture. Modigliani Unmasked examines the artist's rarely seen early works on paper, offering revelatory insights into his artistic sensibilities and concerns as he developed his signature style of graceful, elongated figures.

    An Italian Sephardic Jew working in turn-of-the-century Paris, Modigliani embraced his status as an outsider, and his early drawings show a marked awareness of the role of ethnicity and race within society. Placing these drawings within the context of the artist's larger oeuvre, Mason Klein reveals how Modigliani's preoccupation with identity spurred the artist to reconceive the modern portrait, arguing that Modigliani ultimately came to think of identity as beyond national or cultural boundaries. Lavishly illustrated with the artist's paintings and over one hundred drawings collected by Dr. Paul Alexandre, Modigliani's close friend and first patron, this book provides an engaging and long overdue analysis of Modigliani's early body of work on paper.

  • Hinduism and the Religious Arts

    The roots between the Hindu religion and the wider culture are deep and uniquely complex. No study of either ancient or contemporary Indian culture can be undertaken without a clear understanding of Hindu visual arts and their sources in religious belief

  • Aspergillus and Aspergillosis

    Species of aspergilli are common in man's environment and are responsible for a wide spectrum of human and animal disease, ranging in animals from mycotic abortion to aflatoxicosis and in humans from localized colonization of the ear or skin to life-threatening systemic infection of neutropenic patients. In recent times, invasive aspergillosis has become increasingly important as a cause of morbidity and death, initially in patients receiving immunosuppression prior to organ transplantation, and latterly in haematologic patients rendered neutropenic by underlying disease or chemotherapy. In some centres, the condition has been recorded in more than 40% of patients dying with acute leukaemia. Laboratory diagnostic procedures are not always helpful and the diagnosis depends largely on clinical parameters. The clinician is faced with yet another problem, that of management. At present, antifungal therapy of invasive aspergillosis can be largely ineffectual, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high. Since Aspergillus fumigatus was first described almost 125 years ago, several other pathogenic species have been recognized. The marked biosynthetic abilities and varied mechanisms of gene recombination of aspergilli have long commanded attention in food technology and genetics. Their equally varied abilities to cause disease have attracted the interest of toxicologists, allergists and physicians concerned with infectious diseases.

  • Mapplethorpe + Munch

    A fascinating look at how Mapplethorpe and Munch, although separated by many years, shared certain affinities in their lives and artwork

    This revelatory catalogue delves into the many affinities shared between two widely renowned and discussed artists, Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989) and Edvard Munch (1863-1944), whose intensely studied work has, until now, never been considered in relation to one another. Mapplethorpe + Munch brings to light how these two monumental figures curiously relate on an existential level, in how they deal with questions concerning sexuality, and in their way of utilizing self-portraiture as a means to explore issues of personal identity.

    Featuring essays that examine the thematic impulses behind the accompanying exhibition, this publication establishes a previously unexplored association between two equally contentious art figures, while working to impart alternative perspectives and new insight into their respective outputs. Although distinct in their legacies, Mapplethorpe and Munch remain remarkably intertwined.

  • Simulacra

    Winner of the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets prize

    A fresh and rebellious poetic voice, Airea D. Matthews debuts in the acclaimed series that showcases the work of exciting and innovative young American poets. Matthews's superb collection explores the topic of want and desire with power, insight, and intense emotion. Her poems cross historical boundaries and speak emphatically from a racialized America, where the trajectories of joy and exploitation, striving and thwarting, violence and celebration are constrained by differentials of privilege and contemporary modes of communication. In his foreword, series judge Carl Phillips calls this book "rollicking, destabilizing, at once intellectually sly and piercing and finally poignant." This is poetry that breaks new literary ground, inspiring readers to think differently about what poems can and should do in a new media society where imaginations are laid bare and there is no thought too provocative to send out into the world.

  • Blanche of Castile, Queen of France

    This is the first modern scholarly biography of Blanche of Castile, whose identity has until now been subsumed in that of her son, the saintly Louis IX. A central figure in the politics of medieval Europe, Blanche was a sophisticated patron of religion and culture. Through Lindy Grant's engaging account, based on a close analysis of Blanche's household accounts and of the social and religious networks on which her power and agency depended, Blanche is revealed as a vibrant and intellectually questioning personality.

  • Ahlan Wa Sahlan - Letters & Sounds of the Arabic Language, with Online Media

    This new sound and script workbook is intended to be used and completed by students before they begin using the second edition of the Ahlan wa Sahlan textbook. The workbook helps students learn the alphabet, numerals, and sounds of the Arabic language.

    The 6 units in the workbook correlate to the first 6 lessons of the first edition Ahlan wa Sahlan textbook, published in 2000. The workbook comes with access to online media: www.yalebooks.com/ahlan.

    The new edition of this widely used text covers the first year of instruction in Modern Standard Arabic. It will teach students to read, speak, and write Arabic, while presenting an engaging story that involves Adnan, a Syrian student studying in the United States, and Michael, an American student studying in Cairo. In diaries, letters, and postcards, the two students describe their thoughts and activities, revealing how a non-American views American culture and how the Arabic culture is experienced by an American student. This new edition features video, filmed in Syria; expanded communicative activities; an updated audio program; and material designed according to proficiency principles.

    Features of the New Edition include:

    * Online video, filmed in Syria
    * Expanded communicative activities
    * Updated audio program
    * Material designed according to proficiency principles

    Components of the New Edition include:

    * A full-color Student Textbook with access to an online video and audio program included
    * Annotated Instructor's Edition
    * Sound and Script Workbook
    * Online, interactive exercises

  • Two Centuries of American Still-Life Painting: The Frank and Michelle Hevrdejs Collection

    Showcasing a treasured private collection amassed over several decades, this publication represents the beauty and complexity of still-life painting in the United States. More than 65 works from the Hevrdejs collection, many of which have never been on public view, are accompanied by comprehensive and accessible explanations that contextualize their role in the ongoing development of the genre. Featuring works by prominent and diverse artists such as Raphaelle Peale, Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Andrew Wyeth, this study expands the overall notion of the still life by examining its use in a variety of painting styles from the 19th century to the present day. With color illustrations and an essay and entries by a distinguished scholar, this book demonstrates why the genre has been a compelling preoccupation for American artists over two centuries.

  • Concurrent Computations: Algorithms, Architecture, and Technology

    The 1987 Princeton Workshop on Algorithm, Architecture and Technology Issues for Models of Concurrent Computation was organized as an interdisciplinary work- shop emphasizing current research directions toward concurrent computing systems. With participants from several different fields of specialization, the workshop cov- ered a wide variety of topics, though by no means a complete cross section of issues in this rapidly moving field. The papers included in this book were prepared for the workshop and, taken together, provide a view of the broad range of issues and alternative directions being explored. To organize the various papers, the book has been divided into five parts. Part I considers new technology directions. Part II emphasizes underlying theoretical issues. Communication issues, which are ad- dressed in the majority of papers, are specifically highlighted in Part III. Part IV includes papers stressing the fault tolerance and reliability of systems. Finally, Part V includes systems-oriented papers, where the system ranges from VLSI circuits through powerful parallel computers. Much of the initial planning of the workshop was completed through an informal AT&T Bell Laboratories group consisting of Mehdi Hatamian, Vijay Kumar, Adri- aan Ligtenberg, Sailesh Rao, P. Subrahmanyam and myself. We are grateful to Stuart Schwartz, both for the support of Princeton University and for his orga- nizing local arrangements for the workshop, and to the members of the organizing committee, whose recommendations for participants and discussion topics were par- ticularly helpful. A. Rosenberg, and A. T.

  • Hieronymus Bosch, Painter and Draughtsman: Technical Studies

    Scholars have traditionally focused on the subjects and meanings of Hieronymus Bosch's works, whereas issues of painting technique, workshop participation, and condition of extant pictures have received considerably less attention. Since 2010, the Bosch Research and Conservation Project has been studying these works using modern methods. The team has documented Bosch's extant paintings with infrared reflectography and ultra high-resolution digital macro photography, both in infrared and visible light. Together with microscopic study of the paintings, this has enabled the team to write extensive and critical research reports describing the techniques and condition of the works, published in this extraordinary volume for the first time.

  • 20 Great Conventions Flipper

    Contains those conventions that have proved themselves viable and some that are new but which can significantly improve your competitive results

    Conventions come, conventions go. Those that are worth playing remain, others wither and die. This flipper contains those conventions that have proved themselves viable and some that are new but which can significantly improve your competitive results. Even if you do not play them all, you will want to know what your competitors are doing.

  • Masterpieces Of Declarer Play

    Every page of Masterpieces of Declarer Play offers a piece of wisdom on how to play as a declarer. Together with the companion book on defence, this book captures the essence of the author's extensive knowledge about and instinct for the game. It additionally features a refreshing and exciting collection of hands which will be appreciated by any bridge player. The advice is certain to improve your game while the classic hands will keep you turning the pages.

  • Coming Away: Winslow Homer & England

    A fascinating exploration of the time Winslow Homer spent in England and how it influenced his art

    Winslow Homer (1836-1910) is widely regarded as the greatest American painter of the 19th century, but it is not well known that he spent a pivotal period of time on the other side of the Atlantic. The eighteen months Homer spent in England in 1881 and 1882--studying the work of masters such as J. M. W. Turner and Lawrence Alma-Tadema, and exploring the landscape of coastal villages--irrevocably shaped his creative identity.

    This beautifully designed and produced publication explores Homer's time in England and how it influenced his art, as he attempted to reconcile his affinity for traditional subject matter with his increasingly modern aesthetic vision. Coming Away complicates our understanding of his work and convincingly argues that it has more cosmopolitan underpinnings than previously thought.

  • International Handbook of Production and Operations Management

    In this volume, international experts in the field of production and operations management provide reviews and illustrations of principle areas relating to POM. They cover modern developments, new technologies and new approaches to the subject, as well as providing reviews of current practice and proposals for improvements in procedures and practice in the area.

  • The Witch: A History of Fear, from Ancient Times to the Present

    Why have societies all across the world feared witchcraft? This book delves deeply into its context, beliefs, and origins in Europe's history

    The witch came to prominence--and often a painful death--in early modern Europe, yet her origins are much more geographically diverse and historically deep. In this landmark book, Ronald Hutton traces witchcraft from the ancient world to the early-modern stake.

    This book sets the notorious European witch trials in the widest and deepest possible perspective and traces the major historiographical developments of witchcraft. Hutton, a renowned expert on ancient, medieval, and modern paganism and witchcraft beliefs, combines Anglo-American and continental scholarly approaches to examine attitudes on witchcraft and the treatment of suspected witches across the world, including in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Australia, and North and South America, and from ancient pagan times to current interpretations. His fresh anthropological and ethnographical approach focuses on cultural inheritance and change while considering shamanism, folk religion, the range of witch trials, and how the fear of witchcraft might be eradicated.

  • David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night

    The first comprehensive and most definitive source to date on David Wojnarowicz

    This engaging and richly illustrated book comprehensively examines the life and art of David Wojnarowicz (1954-1992), who came to prominence in New York's East Village art world of the 1980s, actively embracing all media and forging an expansive range of work both fiercely political and highly personal. First displayed in raw storefront galleries, his work achieved national attention at the same moment that the AIDS epidemic was affecting a generation of artists, himself included.

    In a thoughtful overview essay, David Breslin looks at the breadth of the artist's work as well as Wojnarowicz's broad range of interests and influences, situating the artist in the art-historical canon and pushing beyond the biographical focus that has characterized much of the scholarship on Wojnarowicz to fully assess his paintings, photographs, installations, performances, and writing. A close examination of groups of works by David Kiehl sheds new light on the artist's process and the context in which the works were created. Essays by Julie Ault, Gregg Bordowitz, C. Carr, Marvin Taylor, and National Book Award finalist Hanya Yanagihara investigate the relationship between artistic production and cultural activism during the AIDS crisis, as well as provide a necessary accounting and close evaluation of divergent practices that have frequently been subsumed under broad labels like "East Village," "queer," "postmodern," and "neo-expressionist."

  • Ron Klinger Answers Your Bridge Queries

    Are you having a problem at bridge or perhaps a disagreement with your partner? Why not ask the expert? Ron Klinger replies to bridge queries from players around the world. The answers to questions that may have bothered you are also probably in this stimulating book.

  • Burn Out: The Endgame for Fossil Fuels

    An energy revolution is under way with far-reaching consequences for nations, companies, and the way we address climate change

    Low oil prices are sending shockwaves through the global economy, and longtime industry observer Dieter Helm explains how this and other shifts are the harbingers of a coming energy revolution and how the fossil fuel age will come to an end. Surveying recent surges in technological innovations, Helm's provocative new book documents how the global move toward the internet-of-things will inexorably reduce the demand for oil, gas, and renewables--and prove more effective than current efforts to avert climate change.

    Oil companies and energy utilities must begin to adapt their existing business models or face future irrelevancy. Oil-exporting nations, particularly in the Middle East, will be negatively impacted, whereas the United States and European countries that are investing in new technologies may find themselves leaders in the geopolitical game. Timely and controversial, this book concludes by offering advice on what governments and businesses can and should do now to prepare for a radically different energy future.

  • Conducting Clinical Trials

    A few years ago, two of us joined our senior colleague at Pharma- Kinetics Laboratories, a newly public contract research firm just under- taking a major expansion into the clinical trials market. The company's unique concept of clinical research held great promise and had suc- cessfully endured many of the fits and starts characteristic of entrepre- neurial organizations. With a staff of highly enthusiastic, albeit inex- perienced, field personnel located in 30-odd cities around the country, we found ourselves off and running with several critical research pro- grams for major pharmaceutical manufacturers. Our excitement with the innovation was tempered with the reality of staffing and bearing responsibility for more than 30 field offices and 300 new staff persons, more than half of whom had no previous experience in the pharma- ceutical industry. In the ensuing few years, we explored by trial and error many workable and unworkable patterns of training! delegation, data collec- tion, and auditing. The ideas expressed in this book benefited greatly from that experience and from the willingness of our co-workers and clients to share insights and problems. During those years, we also sought guidance from the works available on the clinical trials field. Although we found numerous references on research ethics, little guid- ance was available on the practical aspects of conducting a clinical trial.

  • Medical Virology 8

    No other area of biology has grown as fast and become as relevant over the last decade as virology. It is with no little amount of amaze- ment, that the more we learn about fundamental biological questions and mechanisms of diseases, the more obvious it becomes that viruses perme- ate all facets of our lives. While on one hand viruses are known to cause acute and chronic, mild and fatal, focal and generalized diseases, on the other hand, they are used as tools for gaining an understanding of the structure and function of higher organisms, and as vehicles for carrying protective or curative therapies. The wide scope of approaches to different biological and medical virological questions was well rep- resented by the speakers that participated in this year's Symposium. While the epidemic by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 continues to spread without hope for much relief in sight, intriguing questions and answers in the area of diagnostics, clinical manifestations and therapeutical approaches to viral infections are unveiled daily. Let us hope, that with the increasing awareness by our society of the role played by viruses, not only as causative agents of diseases, but also as models for better understanding basic biological principles, more efforts and resources are placed into their study. Luis M. de la Maza Irvine, California Ellena M.

  • Orthographs: The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center

    This stunning photographic essay traces the development of Renzo Piano's Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center, a multifunctional complex for arts, education, and entertainment opening in 2017 in Athens. Photographer Yiorgis Yerolymbos finds intrigue and beauty in the grit of the construction site, where for nearly a decade he has meticulously recorded the ephemeral forms that underlie and foretell the shape of the future landmark. Deriving its title from architectural orthographic drawings, Orthographs tracks the progress of the building's construction site against Piano's visionary projections and plans. This beautiful volume offers rare, behind-the-scenes access to the work performed and the land and materials moved in the service of turning vision into reality. The large format invites readers to immerse themselves in Yerolymbos's compelling photography, and texts by acclaimed architects and critics hail the importance of the Center and its role in transforming the physical and cultural topography of Athens.

  • Nonmetallic Materials and Composites at Low Temperatures

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  • Better Bridge with a Better Memory: How Mnemonics Will Improve Your Game

    Better Bridge with a Better Memory 'goes beyond ... wide-ranging advice ... and investigates one specific technique in detail. The method demonstrated is mnemonics, and the author shows how that approach, already widely in use in naming agreements and providing clues to their details, can be applied to every phase of the game. As is often the case in Klinger productions, many examples used to demonstrate the case at hand have unrelated interesting points, and the discussions thus provide a welcome variety of topics.' - The Bridge World.

  • Little Jewel

    A mesmerizing novel by Nobel Laureate Patrick Modiano, now superbly translated for English-language readers

    For long standing admirers of Modiano's luminous writing as well as those readers encountering his work for the first time, Little Jewel will be an exciting discovery. Uniquely told by a young female narrator, Little Jewel is the story of a young woman adrift in Paris, imprisoned in an imperfectly remembered past. The city itself is a major character in Modiano's work, and timeless moral ambiguities of the post-Occupation years remain hauntingly unresolved.

    One day in the corridors of the metro, nineteen-year-old Therese glimpses a woman in a yellow coat. Could this be the mother who long ago abandoned her? Is she still alive? Desperate for answers to questions that have tormented her since childhood, Therese pursues the mysterious figure on a quest through the streets of Paris. In classic Modiano style, this book explores the elusive nature of memory, the unyielding power of the past, and the deep human need for identity and connection.

  • Market Whys and Human Wherefores: Thinking Again About Markets, Politics and People

    Focusing on the effects of a free market ideology on economics, politics, and ethics, this book argues for a renewed democratic politics to counterbalance the free market. Topics include: the market as providence, evolution of the market as an information system, capital and its effects on society, and rediscovering democracy and redirecting the market. Well researched and paasionately written, it will appeal to a wide audience of readers.

  • Mass Transport in Solids

    Atomic transport in solids is a field of growing importance in solid state physics and chemistry, and one which, moreover, has important implications in several areas of materials science. This growth is due first to an increase in the understanding of the fund- amentals of transport processes in solids. Of equal importance, however, have been the improvements in the last decade in the experi- mental techniques available for the investigation of transport phenomena. The advances in technique have stimulated studies of a wider range of materials; and expansion of the field has been strong- ly encouraged by the increasing range of applied areas where transport processes play an essential role. For example, mass transport phenomena play a critical role in the technology of fabrication of components in the electronics industry. Transport processes are involved both during the fabrication and operation of devices and with the growing trend to miniaturisation there are increasing demands on accurate control of diffusion processes. The present book (which is based on a NATO sponsored Advanced Study Institute held in 1981 at Lannion, France) aims to present a general survey of the subject, highlighting those areas where work has been especially active in recent years.

  • Short-Term Bioassays in the Analysis of Complex Environmental Mixtures, Part IV

    With this proceedings of the fourth symposium on complex mixtures, we continue to revise and extend our knowledge of genetic methods for the evaluation of chemical mixtures in the environment. The early chapters of this volume are devoted to new bioassay techniques that are directly applicable to the monitoring of environments contaminated with genotoxic chemicals. Microbiological methods have been further refined to meet the special needs of atmospheric monitoring so that very small samples may now be efficiently tested. New in situ methods utilizing green plants actually avoid many of the usual difficulties of sample collection and preparation and offer special advantages in monitoring wastewater, sludges, and hazardous wastes. Insects also are being employed very effectively in the evaluation of gaseous air pollutants in controlled laboratory investigations. Increased emphasis has been placed on a comprehensive assessment of the potential of complex mixtures t9 cause various kinds of genetic damage. New assays for chromosome structural and numerical aberrations in mammalian cells in vitro have been developed and are being applied in laboratory studies. Efforts to link tests for gene mutation and cell transformation in vitro with assays for tumorigenesis in vivo are contributing to the validation of the short-term testing approach. Studies comparing in vitro and in vivo data on a coal conversion by-product, on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and on mineral fibers are reported in separate papers. Later chapters are devoted to investigations on the fractionation and biological evaluation of specific chemical components within complex mixtures.

  • Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 3

    The first volume in this series appeared in 1977, the second in 1980. From these volumes and the present one, some research trends in chemical communication can be perceived. In the 1977 volume, studies on 13 animal taxa were reported. In the present volume, the number is 25. This taxonomie diversi- fication of research since the first volume of this series demon- strates the wide variety of ecological adaptions, although no new general principles of chemical communication have ernerged. Further- more, divergences in chemical comrnunication below the species level have become more apparent. In general, more sophisticated observa- tions and techniques have led to greater awareness of the com- plexities in chemical communication. As such awareness has also developed in the field of insect chemical communication, there has been a corresponding increase in the identification of the chemical compounds involved. However, in the vertebrates, no such correlation exists; in the present volume, conclusive chemical identifications of semiochemicals are remarkable by their paucity.

  • Tarsila do Amaral

    An exploration of the innovative, quintessentially Brazilian painter who merged modernism with the brilliant energy and culture of her homeland

    Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973) was a central figure at the genesis of modern art in her native Brazil, and her influence reverberates throughout 20th- and 21st-century art. Although relatively little-known outside Latin America, her work deserves to be understood and admired by a wide contemporary audience. This publication establishes her rich background in European modernism, which included associations in Paris with artists Fernand Leger and Constantin Brancusi, dealer Ambroise Vollard, and poet Blaise Cendrars. Tarsila (as she is known affectionately in Brazil) synthesized avant-garde aesthetics with Brazilian subjects, creating stylized, exaggerated figures and landscapes inspired by her native country that were powerful emblems of the Brazilian modernist project known as Antropofagia.

    Featuring a selection of Tarsila's major paintings, this important volume conveys her vital role in the emerging modern-art scene of Brazil, the community of artists and writers (including poets Oswald de Andrade and Mario de Andrade) with whom she explored and developed a Brazilian modernism, and how she was subsequently embraced as a national cultural icon. At the same time, an analysis of Tarsila's legacy questions traditional perceptions of the 20th-century art world and asserts the significant role that Tarsila and others in Latin America had in shaping the global trajectory of modernism.

  • Fundamentals of Comparative Vertebrate Endocrinology

    Endocrinology, as a discipline, was a late arrival in the corpus of established subjects. Its growth in recent years has been prodigious, extending from mor- phology to molecular levels. Most of the major endocrine glands were noted by the early anatomists, although the adrenal glands were not described until 1563 by Bartholomaeus Eustachius (1520-1574). On the other hand, elucidation of the function of these glands was extremely slow. Key work by A. A. Berthold (1849), although overlooked at the time, showed that comb atrophy in castrated fowl was prevented by testis transplantation. The idea that glands produced substances reach- ing the bloodstream directly and not via excretory ducts stemmed from Claude Bernard, who first used the term internal secretion in 1855. The clinical observa- tions of Thomas Addison at Guy's Hospital-published as a monograph in 1855 entitled The Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules -were seminal. However, the stimulus of this early research did not bring imme- diate widespread further investigations. Upon the discovery of secretin in 1902, Bayliss and Starling considered the term "internal secretion" to be clumsy, and the term "hormone" was coined (from OQ[!UW-1 excite or arouse) and it was first used by Starling in his Croonian of 1905.

  • When the Sun Bursts - The Enigma of Schizophrenia

    A leading psychoanalyst shares his experiences working with schizophrenic patients to show how effective talk therapy can be as a treatment

    Many schizophrenics experience their condition as one of radical incarceration, mind-altering medications, isolation, and dehumanization. At a time when the treatment of choice is anti-psychotic medication, world-renowned psychoanalyst Christopher Bollas asserts that schizophrenics can be helped by much more humane treatments, and that they have a chance to survive and even reverse the process if they have someone to talk to them regularly and for a sustained period, soon after their first breakdown.

    In this sensitive and evocative narrative, he draws on his personal experiences working with schizophrenics since the 1960's. He offers his interpretation of how schizophrenia develops, typically in the teens, as an adaptation in the difficult transition to adulthood.

    With tenderness, Bollas depicts schizophrenia as an understandable way of responding to our precariousness in a highly unpredictable world. He celebrates the courage of the children he has worked with and reminds us that the wisdom inherent in human beings--to turn to conversation with others when in distress--is the fundamental foundation of any cure for human conflict.

  • Clinical Disorders of Membrane Transport Processes

    Clinical Disorders of Membrane Transport Processes is a softcover book containing a portion of Physiology of Membrane Disorders (Second Edition). The parent volume contains six major sections that deal with general aspects of the physiology of transport processes and specific aspects of transport processes in cells and in organized cellular systems, namely epithelia. This text contains the last section, which deals with the application of the physiology of transport processes to the understanding of clinical disorders. We hope that this smaller volume will be helpful to individuals particularly interested in clinical derangements of membrane transport processes. THOMAS E. ANDREOLI JOSEPH F. HOFFMAN DARRELL D. FANESTIL STANLEY G. SCHULTZ Vll Preface to the Second Edition The second edition of Physiology of Membrane Disorders represents an extensive revision and a considerable expansion of the fIrst edition. Yet the purpose of the second edition is identical to that of its predecessor, namely, to provide a rational analysis of membrane transport processes in individual membranes, cells, tissues, and organs, which in tum serves as a frame of reference for rationalizing disorders in which derangements of membrane transport processes playa cardinal role in the clinical expression of disease. As in the fIrst edition, this book is divided into a number of individual, but closely related, sections. Part V represents a new section where the problem of transport across epithelia is treated in some detail. Finally, Part VI, which analyzes clinical derangements, has been enlarged appreciably.

  • Joy: 100 Poems

    One hundred of the most evocative modern poems on joy, selected by an award-winning contemporary poet

    Christian Wiman, a poet known for his meditations on mortality, has long been fascinated by joy and by its relative absence in modern literature. Why is joy so resistant to language? How has it become so suspect in our times? Manipulated by advertisers, religious leaders, and politicians, joy can seem disquieting, even offensive. How does one speak of joy amid such ubiquitous injustice and suffering in the world?

    In this revelatory anthology, Wiman takes readers on a profound and surprising journey through some of the most underexplored terrain in contemporary life. Rather than define joy for readers, he wants them to experience it. Ranging from Emily Dickinson to Mahmoud Darwish and from Sylvia Plath to Wendell Berry, he brings together diverse and provocative works as a kind of counter to the old, modernist maxim "light writes white"--no agony, no art. His rich selections awaken us to the essential role joy plays in human life.

  • Language in the Judicial Process

    Legal realism is a powerful jurisprudential tradition which urges attention to sodal conditions and predicts their influence in the legal process. The rela- tively recent "sodal sdence in the law" phenomenon, in which sodal research is increasingly relied on to dedde court cases is a direct result of realistic jurisprudence, which accords much significance in law to empirical reports about sodal behavior. The empirical research used by courts has not, how- ever, commonly dealt with language as an influential variable. This volume of essays, coedited by Judith N. Levi and Anne Graffam Walker, will likely change that situation. Language in the Judicial Process is a superb collection of original work which fits weIl into the realist tradition, and by focusing on language as a key variable, it establishes a new and provocative perspective on the legal process. The perspective it offers, and the data it presents, make this volume a valuable source of information both for judges and lawyers, who may be chiefly concemed with practice, and for legal scholars and sodal sdentists who do basic research about law.

  • Quantum Metrology and Fundamental Physical Constants

    The object of this NATO Advanced Study Institute was to pre- sent a tutorial 'introduction both to the basic physics of recent spectacular advances achieved in the field of metrology and to the determination of fundamental physical constants. When humans began to qualify their description of natural phenomena, metrology, the science of measurement, developed along- side geometry and mathematics. However, flam antiquity to modern times, the role of metrology was mostly restricted to the need of commercial, social or scientific transactions of local or at most national scope. Beginning with the Renaissance, and particularly in western Europe during the last century, metrology rapidly developed an international character as a result of growing needs for more accurate measurements and common standards in the emerging indus- trial society. Although the concerns of metrology are deeply rooted to fundamental sciences, it was, until recently, perceived by much of the scientific community as mostly custodial in character.

  • Recent Advances in Thin-Layer Chromatography

    For many years TLC has suffered from the image of being a low sensitivity, low resolution, non-quantitative teehnique, suitable for chemists, but not a tool for real ehromatographers. Whilst perhaps true in the past this attitude no longer ref1eets the eapabi1ities of modern instrumenta1ized TLC in all its many forms. This volume represents the proceedings of a meeting in Brighton in 1987 whieh formed part of a eontinuing series of one and two day events on TLC organized by the Chromatographie Soeiety either alone or, like this one, in eonjunetion with other learned bodies. These meetings are designed to keep ehromatographers up to date with the latest deve10pments and help promote a more positive image of TLC. lan Wilson November 1987 v CONTENTS The Chromatographic Society xi Contemporary Thin-layer Chromatography: An introduction IoD. Wilson INSTRUMENTATION Quantitative Methods in Thin-layer Chromatography C. F. Poole, S. K. Poole and T. A. Dean 11 Fluorescence Line-narrowing Spectroscopy: A New and Highly Selective Detection Technique for Thin-layer and Liquid Chromatography J. W. Hofstraat, C. Gooijer, U. A. Th. Brinkman and N. H. Velthorst 29 Qualitative and Quantitative Image Analysis of Fluorescence from High Performance Thi. n-layer Chromatography R. M. Belchamber, S. J. Brinkworth, H. Read and J. D. M. Roberts 37 Analytical Rotation Planar Chromatography Sz. Nyiredy, K. Dallenbach-Toelke and O. Sticher 45 Analytical and Preparative Overpressured Layer Chromatography E. Mincsovics and E. Tyihak 57 Anticircular Planar Chromatography: Analytical and Preparative Aspects H. Traitler and A.

  • The Maisky Diaries: The Wartime Revelations of Stalin's Ambassador in London

    Highlights of the extraordinary wartime diaries of Ivan Maisky, Soviet ambassador to London

    The terror and purges of Stalin's Russia in the 1930s discouraged Soviet officials from leaving documentary records let alone keeping personal diaries. A remarkable exception is the unique diary assiduously kept by Ivan Maisky, the Soviet ambassador to London between 1932 and 1943. This selection from Maisky's diary, never before published in English, grippingly documents Britain's drift to war during the 1930s, appeasement in the Munich era, negotiations leading to the signature of the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact, Churchill's rise to power, the German invasion of Russia, and the intense debate over the opening of the second front.

    Maisky was distinguished by his great sociability and access to the key players in British public life. Among his range of regular contacts were politicians (including Churchill, Chamberlain, Eden, and Halifax), press barons (Beaverbrook), ambassadors (Joseph Kennedy), intellectuals (Keynes, Sidney and Beatrice Webb), writers (George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells), and indeed royalty. His diary further reveals the role personal rivalries within the Kremlin played in the formulation of Soviet policy at the time. Scrupulously edited and checked against a vast range of Russian and Western archival evidence, this extraordinary narrative diary offers a fascinating revision of the events surrounding the Second World War.

  • Josef Albers: Interaction

    "Only appearances are not deceiving."--Josef Albers

    Josef Albers (1888-1976) was one of the leading pioneers of 20th-century modernism: he was an extraordinary teacher, writer, painter, and color theorist, who is best known for the Homages to the Square (painted 1950-76) and The Interaction of Color, published by Yale University Press in 1963.

    This generously illustrated overview of Albers's work, accompanying the first major exhibition on the artist in more than thirty years, features all aspects of his long, creative career. Beginning with Albers's time at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau, the publication follows the artist to America and describes major themes of his work there as well as the importance of his frequent travels to Mexico. Paintings, prints, furniture, household objects, works in glass, photographs, and pre-Columbian sculptures are beautifully reproduced and discussed by a team of experts. The juxtaposition of Renaissance sculptures and icons with paintings by Albers underlines the intellectual and spiritual dimensions of his art, and Albers's influence on 1960s Minimalist art is also explored.

    Including a comprehensive biography, the book convincingly demonstrates how this great artist transformed modern design by using line, color, surface, and space to challenge the perception of the viewer.

  • After Caravaggio

    A revelatory study of a school of remarkable painters from one of the great art historians of the 20th century

    During the twenty years following Caravaggio's death, his revolutionary precedent inspired the creation of a remarkable body of paintings. Drawing together works by Bartolomeo Manfredi, Valentin de Boulogne, Nicolas Tournier, Nicolas Regnier, Cecco del Caravaggio, and the young Jusepe de Ribera, Michael Fried examines the nature of this later generation's engagement with Caravaggio. The magnitude and interest of their achievements have long been recognized, but existing scholarship has touched only the surface. Fried approaches his topic with seriousness and sophistication, revealing the density of meaning and sheer pictorial ambition in the works of the painters known as the Caravaggisti.

    Accessibly written, this beautifully illustrated book combines an account of works by Manfredi, Valentin, Tournier, Regnier, and Ribera with a detailed case study of Cecco del Caravaggio's Resurrection (1619-20), and concludes by surveying a group of paintings by Guercino, a painter not counted among the Caravaggisti, but whose strategies in relation to the viewer aligned him with their interests. Fried moves with agility between broad and focused fields of vision. In his final remarks, he makes a compelling case for understanding these paintings in relation to the thought of Rene Descartes.

  • Doris Salcedo: The Materiality of Mourning

    A compelling look at Doris Salcedo's works from the past fifteen years, exploring how the artist challenges not only the limits of the materials she uses but also the traditions of sculpture itself

    Colombian sculptor and installation artist Doris Salcedo (b. 1958) creates works that address political violence and oppression. This pioneering book, which focuses on Salcedo's works from 2001 to the present, examines the development and evolution of her approach. These sculptures have pushed toward new extremes, incorporating organic materials--rose petals, grass, soil--in order to blur the line between the permanent and the ephemeral.

    This insightful text illuminates the artist's practice: exhaustive personal interviews and deep research joined with painstaking acts of making that both challenge limits and set new directions in materiality. Mary Schneider Enriquez convincingly argues for viewing Salcedo's oeuvre not just through a particular theoretical lens, such as violence studies or trauma and memory studies, but for the profound way the artist engages with and expands the traditions of sculpture as a medium.

  • Classical Splendor: Painted Furniture for a Grand Philadelphia House

    This handsome book explores in depth a group of stunning painted and gilded furniture designed by the architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764-1820), best known for originating the plans for the United States Capitol. The furniture was made in Philadelphia for one of the city's finest houses--the home of William and Mary Wilcocks Waln, which Latrobe also designed. Drawing on a multiyear conservation and research project, Classical Splendor reveals new insights into the patrons, makers, and history behind these extraordinary pieces. In addition to extensively documenting each item, the book attests to Latrobe's significant contributions to American furniture design--his pieces for the Waln house introduced, and served as exemplars of, a classical style rooted in ancient Greek and Roman design.

  • No Limits: Zao Wou-Ki

    The Chinese-French painter Zao Wou-Ki (1920-2013) developed a distinctive abstract style blending the visual poetry of Chinese painting and calligraphy with European pictorial traditions. This stunning volume presents a richly woven narrative of the artist's life and work. Reintroducing Zao's work to a North American audience, the authors make a substantial contribution to scholarship on transnational art movements in the 20th and 21st centuries. Their essays consider the reception of Zao's work in the United States; his engagement with post-war abstraction; and his exploration of various artistic media. Zao Wou-Ki lived and worked at the intersection of two cultures. He blended Chinese calligraphic and ink painting aesthetics with European printmaking and abstract oil painting, becoming one of the earliest trans-cultural painters of the 20th century. His legacy reverberates in the global success of Chinese artists today.

  • An Invitation to Public Relations

    This text explores the historical roots of public relations and its place in society, providing a critical survey of its functions, and how they are used and abused. The book tackles the business of public relations in its most challenging and controversial guises: in politics, in management, in crisis, and in the worldwide creation of hype. It reviews the advances in communications technology which are creating the new environment faced by the next generation of public relations practitioners. In a blend of business practicality and scholarly research, it provides international examples across a broad range of enterprises.

  • Picasso and the Art of Drawing

    In this generously illustrated and lively book, Christopher Lloyd sets out and interprets the lifelong achievement of Picasso (1881-1973) as a draftsman. Although there have been many publications about his drawings that have tended to focus on particular periods of his career, this stunning volume specifically examines how drawing serves as the vital thread connecting all of Picasso's art, just as it also links his private world with his public persona of which he was becoming increasingly aware in his later years. Picasso and the Art of Drawing ultimately showcases how the basis of the titular artist's style as painter, sculptor, printmaker, and designer was manifestly achieved through drawing.

  • Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning: Extreme Forms of Atmospheric Electricity

    The purpose of this monograph is to review the known physical aspects of two unusual forms of atmospheric luminous phenomena, to deduce their characteristics and properties, and to promote efforts to improve their understanding. These two forms, called ball lightning and bead lightning, have visual images that differ from the linear image associated with normallightning. The terms "balliightning" and "bead lightning" are used to denote atmospheric luminous forms which are occasionally observed and have the geometrie shape suggested by their name. Vet, it is possible that neither phenomenon may in fact be a form of lightning in the sense of a continuous electrical discharge. Bead lightning has been described as the residue of a cloud-to- cloud or cloud-to-ground lightning stroke and has the appearance of aseries of luminous balls separated by dark regions, thus resembling astring of pearls, and remains visible for about one second. Ball lightning has been described as a single luminous globe appearing ne ar the ground after a lightning stroke and also remaining visible for about one second. Both phenomena remain visible far longer than normal lightning flashes.

  • The Club: Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age

    Named one of the 10 Best Books of 2019 by the New York Times Book Review

    "Damrosch brings the Club's redoubtable personalities -- the brilliant minds, the jousting wits, the tender camaraderie -- to vivid life..."--The New York Times Book Review

    In 1763, the painter Joshua Reynolds proposed to his friend Samuel Johnson that they invite a few friends to join them every Friday at the Turk's Head Tavern in London to dine, drink, and talk until midnight. Eventually the group came to include among its members Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, Edward Gibbon, and James Boswell. It was known simply as "the Club."

    In this captivating book, Leo Damrosch brings alive a brilliant, competitive, and eccentric cast of characters. With the friendship of the "odd couple" Samuel Johnson and James Boswell at the heart of his narrative, Damrosch conjures up the precarious, exciting, and often brutal world of late eighteenth-century Britain. This is the story of an extraordinary group of people whose ideas helped to shape their age, and our own.

  • Isotope Shifts in Atomic Spectra

    Atomic and nuclear physics are two flourishing but distinct branches of physics; the subject of isotope shifts in atomic spectra is one of the few that links these two branches. It is a subject that has been studied for well over fifty years, but interest in the subject, far from flagging, has been stimulated in recent years. Fast computers have enabled theoreticians to evaluate the properties of many-electron atoms, and laser spectroscopy has made it possible to measure isotope shifts in the previously unmeasurable areas of very rare isotopes, short-lived radioactive isotopes, weak transitions, and transitions involving high-lying atomic levels. Isotope shifts can now be measured with greater accuracy than before in both optical transitions and x-ray transitions of muonic atoms; this improved accuracy is revealing new facets of the subject. I am very grateful to Dr. H. G. Kuhn, F. R. S., for having introduced me to the subject in the 1950s, and for supervising my efforts to measure isotope shifts in the spectrum of ruthenium. I thus approach the subject as an experimental atomic spectroscopist. This bias is obviously apparent in my use of the spectroscopist's notation of lower-upper for a transition, rather than the nuclear physicist's upper-lower. My reasons are given in Section 1. 3 and I hope that nuclear physicists will forgive me for using this notation even for muonic x-ray transitions.

  • Orchestrating Elegance: Alma-Tadema and the Marquand Music Room

    During the 19th century, New York City's grand mansions on Fifth and Madison Avenues boasted sumptuous interiors, often with each room decorated in a different historic style. Financier, art collector, and philanthropist Henry Gurdon Marquand famously commissioned eminent British painter Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) to create the Greco-Pompeian music room for his home. This beautiful publication documents and examines the celebrated design, which included an elaborately decorated Steinway grand piano, a large suite of matching furniture, and an embroidery scheme for the upholstery and coordinated curtains. Alma-Tadema secured Frederic Leighton to create a major painting for the room's ceiling and Sir Edward Poynter to paint the piano's fallboard. One of Alma-Tadema's most famous paintings, A Reading from Homer, was painted for this room. For the first time since Marquand's death in 1902, the contents of this exceptional room have been brought together and considered in light of Marquand's patronage, Alma-Tadema's career, the firm that manufactured the furniture, and the social function of the music room.

  • The Edge of Reason: A Rational Skeptic in an Irrational World

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    An urgent defense of reason, the essential method for resolving--or even discussing--divisive issues

    Reason, long held as the highest human achievement, is under siege. According to Aristotle, the capacity for reason sets us apart from other animals, yet today it has ceased to be a universally admired faculty. Rationality and reason have become political, disputed concepts, subject to easy dismissal.

    Julian Baggini argues eloquently that we must recover our reason and reassess its proper place, neither too highly exalted nor completely maligned. Rationality does not require a sterile, scientistic worldview, it simply involves the application of critical thinking wherever thinking is needed. Addressing such major areas of debate as religion, science, politics, psychology, and economics, the author calls for commitment to the notion of a "community of reason," where disagreements are settled by debate and discussion, not brute force or political power. Baggini's insightful book celebrates the power of reason, our best hope--indeed our only hope--for dealing with the intractable quagmires of our time.

  • Killing Defence At Bridge

    Killing Defence at Bridge is one of the great classics of bridge. It carries the mark of a genius and was the first in a series of major books written by Hugh Kelsey, who became internationally recognised as a leading authority on the analysis of bridge. He coupled this incisive thinking with a brilliant skill with words and made the most complex techniques in bridge sound simple and easy to grasp. Killing Defence features a foreword by Ron Klinger, one of bridge's leading teachers.

  • Industrial Applications of the Mossbauer Effect

    As is often the case, the preface is the last task to be finished during the preparation of a large volume such as you are now holding. The first task, obtaining approval for a symposium on the industrial applications, now seems a long time ago. The idea orginated with John Stevens, probably in 1982, from his observation of papers dealing with industrial applications of the Mossbauer effect appearing in the Mossbauer Effect Reference and Data Journal. His initial suggestion for a symposium entitled "Industrial Applications of the Mossbauer Effect" to be held at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society eventually led to the symposium at the International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies which met in Honolulu, Hawaii in December 1984. This volume is the result of the symposium at the above mentioned Congress, but is not actually the 'proceedings' of the symposium because this volume does not contain all of the over one hundred Mossbauer effect papers that were pre- sented at the symposium. Rather it contains a selection of papers that the or- ganizing committee for the symposium deemed most appropriate for a volume devoted to industrial applications of the Mossbauer effect. The final volume also contains six chapters that were not a part of the symposium but which are closely related to the topic. There is another difference from many proceedings.

  • Chanel: The Complete Karl Lagerfeld Collections: Catwalk

    A comprehensive and captivating overview of Karl Lagerfeld's Chanel creations, featuring more than 150 collections presented through original catwalk photography

    The collections of Karl Lagerfeld have made headlines and dictated trends in the world of fashion ever since his first show for Chanel in 1983. This superbly illustrated and lavishly produced publication---with real cloth binding, irridescent foil stamping, and ribbons for bookmarking your favorite pages---depicts every Chanel collection created by Lagerfeld (more than 150 in all), providing a unique opportunity to chart the development of one of the world's most influential fashion brands and discover some rarely seen collections.

    Chanel opens with a brief history and analysis of the House of Chanel from its creation to the present, followed by a biographical profile of Karl Lagerfeld. The collections are explored chronologically with short texts that highlight each collection's influences and iconic looks, revealing Lagerfeld's inspired reinvention of classic Chanel style elements from season to season. Each collection is illustrated with a carefully curated selection of catwalk images, showcasing hundreds of spectacular clothes, from luxurious haute couture to trendsetting ready-to-wear, accessories, beauty looks, and set designs. Moreover, top fashion models are featured, including Cara Delevingne, Linda Evangelista, Kate Moss, and Claudia Schiffer. The runway photographs offer a rare glimpse of the original styling from head to toe, and make this book a valuable resource for Chanel connoisseurs. A rich reference section concludes this essential publication for all fashionistas, designers, and admirers of Chanel.


  • Who Is an Evangelical?: The History of a Movement in Crisis

    A leading historian of evangelicalism offers a concise history of evangelicals and how they became who they are today

    Evangelicalism is arguably America's most controversial religious movement. Nonevangelical people who follow the news may have a variety of impressions about what "evangelical" means. But one certain association they make with evangelicals is white Republicans. Many may recall that 81 percent of self-described white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump, and they may well wonder at the seeming hypocrisy of doing so.

    In this illuminating book, Thomas Kidd draws on his expertise in American religious history to retrace the arc of this spiritual movement, illustrating just how historically peculiar that political and ethnic definition (white Republican) of evangelicals is. He examines distortions in the public understanding of evangelicals, and shows how a group of "Republican insider evangelicals" aided the politicization of the movement. This book will be a must-read for those trying to better understand the shifting religious and political landscape of America today.

  • Claretta: Mussolini's Last Lover

    A master historian illuminates the tumultuous relationship of Il Duce and his young lover Claretta, whose extraordinarily intimate diaries only recently have become available

    Few deaths are as gruesome and infamous as those of Benito Mussolini, Italy's fascist dictator, and Claretta (or Clara) Petacci, his much-younger lover. Shot dead by Italian partisans after attempting to flee the country in 1945, the couple's bodies were then hanged upside down in Milan's main square in ignominious public display. This provocative book is the first to mine Clara's extensive diaries, family correspondence, and other sources to discover how the last in Mussolini's long line of lovers became his intimate and how she came to her violent fate at his side.

    R. J. B. Bosworth explores the social climbing of Claretta's family, her naive and self-interested commitment to fascism, her diary's graphically detailed accounts of sexual life with Mussolini, and much more. Brimful of new and arresting information, the book sheds intimate light not only on an ordinary-extraordinary woman living at the heart of Italy's totalitarian fascist state but also on Mussolini himself.

  • For God and Kaiser: The Imperial Austrian Army 1619 to 1918

    The definitive history of Austria's multinational army and its immense role during three centuries of European military history

    Among the finest examples of deeply researched and colorfully written military history, Richard Bassett's For God and Kaiser is a major account of the Habsburg army told for the first time in English. Bassett shows how the Imperial Austrian Army, time and again, was a decisive factor in the story of Europe, the balance of international power, and the defense of Christendom. Moreover it was the first pan-European army made up of different nationalities and faiths, counting among its soldiers not only Christians but also Muslims and Jews.

    Bassett tours some of the most important campaigns and battles in modern European military history, from the seventeenth century through World War I. He details technical and social developments that coincided with the army's story and provides fascinating portraits of the great military leaders as well as noteworthy figures of lesser renown. Departing from conventional assessments of the Habsburg army as ineffective, outdated, and repeatedly inadequate, the author argues that it was a uniquely cohesive and formidable fighting force, in many respects one of the glories of the old Europe.

  • Dispatches from Planet 3: Thirty-Two (Brief) Tales on the Solar System, the Milky Way, and Beyond

    An award-winning science writer presents a captivating collection of cosmological essays for the armchair astronomer

    The galaxy, the multiverse, and the history of astronomy are explored in this engaging compilation of cosmological tales by multiple-award-winning science writer Marcia Bartusiak. In thirty-two concise and engrossing essays, the author provides a deeper understanding of the nature of the universe and those who strive to uncover its mysteries.

    Bartusiak shares the back stories for many momentous astronomical discoveries, including the contributions of such pioneers as Beatrice Tinsley, with her groundbreaking research in galactic evolution, and Jocelyn Bell Burnell, the scientist who first discovered radio pulsars. An endlessly fascinating collection that you can dip into in any order, these pieces will transport you to ancient Mars, when water flowed freely across its surface; to the collision of two black holes, a cosmological event that released fifty times more energy than was radiating from every star in the universe; and to the beginning of time itself.

  • Dictators Without Borders: Power and Money in Central Asia

    A penetrating look into the unrecognized and unregulated links between autocratic regimes in Central Asia and centers of power and wealth throughout the West

    Weak, corrupt, and politically unstable, the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan are dismissed as isolated and irrelevant to the outside world. But are they? This hard-hitting book argues that Central Asia is in reality a globalization leader with extensive involvement in economics, politics and security dynamics beyond its borders. Yet Central Asia's international activities are mostly hidden from view, with disturbing implications for world security.

    Based on years of research and involvement in the region, Alexander Cooley and John Heathershaw reveal how business networks, elite bank accounts, overseas courts, third-party brokers, and Western lawyers connect Central Asia's supposedly isolated leaders with global power centers. The authors also uncover widespread Western participation in money laundering, bribery, foreign lobbying by autocratic governments, and the exploiting of legal loopholes within Central Asia. Riveting and important, this book exposes the global connections of a troubled region that must no longer be ignored.

  • Macromolecules

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  • Water Gardens: Everything You Need to Create a Garden

    Whether your water feature is a simple half barrel containing a single water lily or a formal fountain, this book provides guidance on selecting the right plants, pond maintenance and useful tips on how to plant and care for water plants. Including an extensive plant directory, giving full information on varieties and cultivars. A quick, authoritative reference on all aspects of planting and maintaining a garden, including advice on habitats and soil types, co-ordinating colour and foliage, identifying and dealing with pests.

  • Penicillium and Acremonium

    Biotechnology is a word that was originally coined to describe the new processes which could be derived from our ability to manipulate, in vitro, the genetic material common to all organisms. I t has now become a generic term encompassing all "applications" of living systems, including the more traditional fermentation and agricultural industries. Recombinant DNA technology has opened up new opportunities for the exploitation of microorganisms and animal and plant cells as producers or modifiers of chemical and biological products. This series of handbooks deals exclusively with microorganisms which are at the forefront of the new technologies and brings together in each of its volumes the background information necessary to appreciate the historical development of the organisms making up a particular genus, the degree to which molecular biology has opened up new opportunities, and the place they occupy in today's biotechnology industry. Our aim was to make this primarily a practical approach, with emphasis on methodology, combining for the first time information which has largely been spread across a wide literature base or only touched upon briefly in review articles. Each handbook should provide the reader with a source text, from which the importance of the genus to his or her work can be identified, and a practical guide to the handling and exploitation of the organisms included.

  • Definability and Computability

    In this book, Yurii L. Ershov posits the view that computability-in the broadest sense-can be regarded as the Sigma-definability in the suitable sets. He presents a new approach to providing the Godel incompleteness theorem based on systematic use of the formulas with the restricted quantifiers. The volume also includes a novel exposition on the foundations of the theory of admissible sets with urelements, using the Gandy theorem throughout the theory's development. Other topics discussed are forcing, Sigma-definability, dynamic logic, and Sigma-predicates of finite types.

  • Language in Psychotherapy: Strategies of Discovery

    This book of original contributions presents investigations of psycho- therapautic interaction. While the methodological strategies and the- oretical orientations of these investigations are notably diverse, the utterance-by-utterance analysis of client-therapist dialogue provides a strong commonality of interest and a particularly productive perspective from which the process of psychotherapy can be illuminated. It is hoped that the contributions selected, and the problems with which they are occupied, will make evident the rich possibilities such a perspective has to offer. It should be noted, however, that the present volume is not a com- pendium: any effort to be exhaustive would be thwarted by considera- tions of length alone. Thus, certain omissions were inevitable. It is hoped that the interested reader will use the extensive references to become acquainted with the works not here included. Whatever effort I extended as editor and contributor to this volume could not have been undertaken without the lifelong spirit of support of my parents, Selma S. and Jay F. Russell. I dedicate my contribution to them.

  • Mexico 1900-1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Jose Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-garde

    Mexico 1900-1950 offers an unprecedented survey of Mexican art from the turn of the century through the Revolution (1910-20) and until the early 1950s. It examines key works across different mediums by major Mexican artists, including Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Jose Clemente Orozco, as well as by lesser-known figures and women artists. The catalogue showcases Mexican modern art as its own distinct avant-garde, fundamentally different from that of Europe. Although many Mexican artists lived and practiced in Paris during the early decades of the 20th century, they eventually returned home and drew extensively from themes surrounding nationhood and Mexico's rich, mythical past, poignantly articulating their country's revolutionary ideals, traditions, and aspirations. Over 250 illustrations foreground this wholly original and sweeping study of Mexico as a hotbed for modernism and artistic achievement.

  • Ron Klinger's Master Class

    When the English Bridge Union invited Ron Klinger to give these lectures it could not have foreseen the extent of the response from bridge players. Ron Klinger has the enviable ability to make even the most complex bridge matters seem readily understandable, which is why he has a devoted world-wide following. This book enlarges on the lecture topics which range from bidding and opening leads to better card play and slams and is the perfect way to improve your game.

  • Fortress Malta: An Island Under Siege 1940-1943

    The extraordinary drama of Malta's WWII victory against impossible odds told through the eyes of the people who were there.

    In March and April 1942, more explosives were dropped on the tiny Mediterranean island of Malta - smaller than the Isle of Wight - than on the whole of Britain during the first year of the Blitz. Malta had become one of the most strategically important places in the world. From there, the Allies could attack Axis supply lines to North Africa; without it, Rommel would be able to march unchecked into Egypt, Suez and the Middle East. For the Allies this would have been catastrophic. As Churchill said, Malta had to be held 'at all costs'.

    FORTRESS MALTA follows the story through the eyes of those who were there: young men such as twenty-year-old fighter pilot Raoul Daddo-Langlois, anti-aircraft gunner Ken Griffiths, American Art Roscoe and submariner Tubby Crawford - who served on the most successful Allied submarine of the Second World War; cabaret dancer-turned RAF plotter Christina Ratcliffe, and her lover, the brilliant and irrepressible reconnaissance pilot, Adrian Warburton. Their stories and others provide extraordinary first-hand accounts of heroism, resilience, love, and loss, highlighting one of the most remarkable stories of World War II.

  • The Lessons of Tragedy: Statecraft and World Order

    In this timely new book, two distinguished historians remind us that American prosperity and security were built by leaders with a tragic understanding of the past. Brands and Edel argue that recovering a tragic sensibility--an understanding that the descent into violence and war has been all too common throughout human history--is necessary to address the dangers that stalk the international order today.

  • Environmental Law and American Business: Dilemmas of Compliance

    We are in the second decade of modem environmental law. By some indicators this body of regulation has matured greatly. We can point to statutes and codes at the federal, state, and local levels which address almost every conceivable form of pollution and environmental insult. Yet, despite the existence of this large body of law, despite considerable expenditures on enforcement, and despite the energetic efforts of people sympathetic to environmental objectives, violations are numerous. Serious pollution problems are commonplace. Love Canal, the Valley of the Drums, Times Beach, and Stringfellow Acid Pits epitomize the national environmental quality challenge. Daily, a major illegal disposal of haz- ardous waste is recorded; a new mismanaged dump site is discovered; a toxic substance is found in our drinking water; or a failure to meet a water or air quality standard is identified. Many of these violations involve American business. Failures to comply are of several types. A small businessman in Pennsylvania mistakenly allows a spillover of a pollutant into a protected stream. An industrialist in the Midwest adds to his fortune by illegally dumping dangerous chemicals. A series of errors by several firms, some of which no longer exist, combine to create a health- threatening conflagration on the West Coast. An automobile company interprets one of the almost innumerable air pollution rules differently from government: It produces a car which the government says fails to comply with the Clean Air Act.

  • Cy Twombly: Fifty Days at Iliam

    This revelatory publication provides a comprehensive and multifaceted account of Cy Twombly's masterpiece Fifty Days at Iliam (1978), a series of ten paintings based on Alexander Pope's 18th-century translation of Homer's Iliad. Essays by a team of both art historians and scholars of Greco-Roman studies explore topics including the paintings' literary and cultural references to antiquity and Twombly's broader engagement with the theme of the Trojan War, which first appeared in his work in the early 1960s and was a subject to which he would return throughout his career. Firsthand accounts of the artist at work complement the essays. Images of the canvases and related drawings and sculptures are joined by previously unpublished photographs showing Fifty Days at Iliam in the artist's studio at the time of their completion.

  • Six Poets: Hardy to Larkin: an Anthology

    The inimitable Alan Bennett selects and comments upon six favorite poets and the pleasures of their works

    In this candid, thoroughly engaging book, Alan Bennett creates a unique anthology of works by six well-loved poets. Freely admitting his own youthful bafflement with poetry, Bennett reassures us that the poets and poems in this volume are not only accessible but also highly enjoyable. He then proceeds to prove irresistibly that this is so.

    Bennett selects more than seventy poems by Thomas Hardy, A. E. Housman, John Betjeman, W. H. Auden, Louis MacNeice, and Philip Larkin. He peppers his discussion of these writers and their verse with anecdotes, shrewd appraisal, and telling biographical detail: Hardy lyrically recalls his first wife, Emma, in his poetry, although he treated her shabbily in real life. The fabled Auden was a formidable and off-putting figure at the lectern. Larkin, hoping to subvert snooping biographers, ordered personal papers shredded upon his death.

    Simultaneously profound and entertaining, Bennett's book is a paean to poetry and its creators, made all the more enjoyable for being told in his own particular voice. its creators, made all the more enjoyable for being told in his own particular voice.

  • Data Communications Principles

    This unique text, for both the first year graduate student and the newcomer to the field, provides in-depth coverage of the basic principles of data communications and covers material which is not treated in other texts, including phase and timing recovery and echo cancellation. Throughout the book, exercises and applications illustrate the material while up-to-date references round out the work.

  • Pedigree: A Memoir

    Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano has said that his many fictions are all variations of the same story. Pedigree, his memoir, is the theme.

    In this rare glimpse into the life of Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano, the author takes up his pen to tell his personal story. He addresses his early years--shadowy times in postwar Paris that haunt his memory and have inspired his world-cherished body of fiction. In the spare, absorbing, and sometimes dreamlike prose that translator Mark Polizzotti captures unerringly, Modiano offers a memoir of his first twenty-one years. Termed one of his "finest books" by the Guardian, Pedigree is both a personal exploration and a luminous portrait of a world gone by.

    Pedigree sheds light on the childhood and adolescence that Modiano explores in Suspended Sentences, Dora Bruder, and other novels. In this work he re-creates the louche, unstable, colorful world of his parents under the German Occupation; his childhood in a household of circus performers and gangsters; and his formative friendship with the writer Raymond Queneau. While acknowledging that memory is never assured, Modiano recalls with painful clarity the most haunting moments of his early life, such as the death of his ten-year-old brother. Pedigree, Modiano's only memoir, is a gift to his readers and a master key to the themes that have inspired his writing life.

  • Growth of Crystals: v. 19 (Growth of Crystals)

    Volume 19 includes articles on growth of crystals from the vapor, from the melt, and from fluxes, as well as a section on actual structure of crystals and films relative to growth conditions.

  • The Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Center: Structure and Dynamics

    This volume contains the contributions from the speakers at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Structure of the Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Center X-ray Crystallography and Optical Spectroscopy with Polarized Light" which was held at the "Maison d'Hotes" of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache in the South of France, 20-25 September, 1987. This meeting continued in the spirit of a previous workshop which took place in Feldafing (FRG), March 1985. Photosynthetic reaction centers are intrinsic membrane proteins which, by performing a photoinduced transmembrane charge separation, are responsible for the conversion and storage of solar energy. Since the pioneering work of Reed and Clayton (1968) on the isolation of the reaction center from photosynthetic bacteria, optical spectroscopy with polarized light has been one of the main tools used to investigate the geometrical arrangement of the various chromophores in these systems. The recent elucidation by X-ray crystallography of the structure of several bacterial reaction centers, a breakthrough initiated by Michel and Deisenhofer, has provided us with the atomic coordinates of the pigments and some details about their interactions with neighboring aminoacid residues. This essential step has given a large impetus both to experimentalists and to theoreticians who are now attempting to relate the X-ray structural model to the optical properties of the reaction center and ultimately to its primary biological function.

  • The Chessboard and the Web: Strategies of Connection in a Networked World

    From a renowned foreign-policy expert, a new paradigm for strategy in the twenty-first century

    In 1961, Thomas Schelling's The Strategy of Conflict used game theory to radically reenvision the U.S.-Soviet relationship and establish the basis of international relations for the rest of the Cold War. Now, Anne-Marie Slaughter--one of Foreign Policy's Top 100 Global Thinkers from 2009 to 2012, and the first woman to serve as director of the State Department Office of Policy Planning--applies network theory to develop a new set of strategies for the post-Cold War world. While chessboard-style competitive relationships still exist--U.S.-Iranian relations, for example--many other situations demand that we look not at individual entities but at their links to one another. We must learn to understand, shape, and build on those connections.

    Concise and accessible, based on real-world situations, on a lucid understanding of network science, and on a clear taxonomy of strategies, this will be a go-to resource for anyone looking for a new way to think about strategy in politics or business.

  • The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana

    This stunning volume showcases and explores a rich and varied collection of Asante royal regalia in the broader context of Asante art. The Asante Kingdom, founded around 1701 in the Gold Coast (now Ghana), was renowned for gold, the foundation of its wealth and power. For centuries they mined this metal and traded it with northerners on the Saharan caravan routes and Europeans along the Atlantic coast. The earliest examples of Asante gold were recovered from the wreck of the Whydah, a slave ship that sank off Cape Cod in 1717. The Power of Gold focuses on a dazzling array of adornments and implements used by Asante royals and officials during the 18th century to the present day--providing a deeper understanding of the history, traditions, and visual arts of the Asante people, one of the thriving cultures of West Africa.

  • Troubleyn / Laboratorium

    This handsome book peers into Troubleyn/Laboratorium, the workspace, collective art space, and creative incubator of Belgian multidisciplinary artist Jan Fabre (b. 1958), whose performances, staged since the 1980s, have brought him international acclaim and recognition. Expressing the collective aims of Fabre's theatre company, Troubleyn/Laboratorium functions as his workspace as well as a nurturing environment for the activities of his theater company and young artists alike, in which artists are free to develop and materialize their creative impulses. The building, situated in a progressive multicultural neighborhood in northern Antwerp, houses a uniquely integrated collection of art works from international visual artists, writers, theatre makers, and philosophers, with whom Jan Fabre feels a close affinity and whose works represent the overall cooperative spirit of the space itself. Fostering an environment that is as progressive as the artist's varied oeuvre, Troubleyn/Laboratorium provides the grounds for an idealistic hotbed of artistic activity and this publication offers a glimpse of that possible utopia.


  • The Story of Physics

    The authors discuss the history of physical science, from the ancient Greeks until modern times.

  • Sleep of Memory

    The newest best-seller by Patrick Modiano is a beautiful tapestry that brings together memory, esoteric encounters, and fragmented sensations

    Patrick Modiano's first novel since his 2014 Nobel Prize revisits moments of the author's past to produce a spare yet moving reflection on the destructive underside of love, the dreams and follies of youth, the vagaries of memory, and the melancholy of loss. Writing from the perspective of an older man, the narrator relives a key period in his life through his relationships with several enigmatic women--Genevieve, Martine, Madeleine, a certain Madame Huberson--in the process unearthing his troubled relationship with his parents, his unorthodox childhood, and the unsettled years of his youth that helped form the celebrated writer he would become. This is
    classic Modiano, utilizing his signature mix of autobiography and invention to create his most intriguing and intimate book yet.

  • The Brothers Le Nain: Painters of Seventeenth-Century France

    A beautiful volume that brings to light the forgotten Le Nain brothers, a trio of 17th-century French master painters who specialized in portraiture, religious subjects, and scenes of everyday peasant life

    In France in the 17th century, the brothers Antoine (c. 1598-1648), Louis (c. 1600/1605-1648), and Mathieu (1607-1677) Le Nain painted images of everyday life for which they became posthumously famous. They are celebrated for their depictions of middle-class leisure activities, and particularly for their representations of peasant families, who gaze out at the viewer. The uncompromising naturalism of these compositions, along with their oddly suspended action, imparts a sense of dignity to their subjects.

    Featuring more than sixty paintings highlighting the artists' full range of production, including altarpieces, private devotional paintings, portraits, and the poignant images of peasants for which the brothers are best known, this generously illustrated volume presents new research concerning the authorship, dating, and meaning of the works by well-known scholars in the field. Also groundbreaking are the results of a technical study of the paintings, which constitutes a major contribution to the scholarship on the Le Nain brothers.

  • Picasso the Line

    The first comprehensive study of Picasso's mastery of line drawing and its centrality to his artistic process

    This beautiful new study provides an insightful reevaluation of the role of line in the work of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973). Picasso pursued drawing assiduously throughout his career, ranging across media such as pen and pencil, charcoal, and papier colle. This book brings together eighty extraordinary drawings spanning the most important phases of Picasso's career. Contributors discuss the artist's intensive exploration of line in relation to three-dimensional form, both in the context of the European artistic tradition and in analyses of selected works. Drawing emerges as central to the artist's process--a creative process that reveals another facet of Picasso's genius for making art out of the simplest of means.

    The first in-depth exploration of the artist's line drawings, Picasso The Line conveys how essential these powerful works are within the artist's oeuvre. As Picasso himself stated: "line drawings are the only ones that cannot be imitated."

  • The Carbon Crunch - Revised and Updated

    In a new edition of his hard-hitting book on climate change, economist Dieter Helm looks at how and why we have failed to tackle the issue of global warming and argues for a new, pragmatic rethinking of energy policy.

    "An optimistically levelheaded book about actually dealing with global warming."--Kirkus Reviews, starred review

    "[Dieter Helm] has turned his agile mind to one of the great problems of our age: why the world's efforts to curb the carbon dioxide emissions behind global warming have gone so wrong, and how it can do better."--Pilita Clark, Financial Times

  • Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe

    A world-renowned economist offers cogent and powerful reflections on one of the great avoidable economic catastrophes of the modern era

    The economic crisis in Greece is a potential international disaster and one of the most extraordinary monetary and political dramas of our time. The financial woes of this relatively small European nation threaten the long-term viability of the Euro while exposing the flaws in the ideal of continental unity. "Solutions" proposed by Europe's combined leadership have sparked a war of prideful words and stubborn one-upmanship, and they are certain to fail, according to renowned economist James K. Galbraith, because they are designed for failure. It is this hypocrisy that prompted former finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, when Galbraith arrived in Athens as an adviser, to greet him with the words "Welcome to the poisoned chalice."

    In this fascinating, insightful, and thought-provoking collection of essays--which includes letters and private memos to both American and Greek officials, as well as other previously unpublished material--Galbraith examines the crisis, its causes, its course, and its meaning, as well as the viability of the austerity program imposed on the Greek citizenry. It is a trenchant, deeply felt commentary on what the author calls "economic policy as moral abomination," and an eye-opening analysis of a contemporary Greek tragedy much greater than the tiny economy of the nation itself.

  • Louis Vuitton: The Complete Fashion Collections

    Two decades of fashion history in the making, told through a sumptuous array of images straight from the catwalk

    Founded as a luxury leather goods house in 1854, Louis Vuitton was for many decades one of the world's leading trunk and accessories makers. It was through the launch of its first fashion collections, however, that the house reached unprecedented fame, becoming one of the most influential and valuable luxury brands in the world. This definitive publication is the first to provide an overview of Louis Vuitton's influential designs.

    It opens with a concise history of the house, followed by brief profiles of designers Marc Jacobs and Nicolas Ghesquiere, before exploring the collections themselves. Organized chronologically, each collection is introduced by a short text unveiling its influences and highlights, and illustrated with carefully curated catwalk images. The volume showcases hundreds of spectacular clothes, details, accessories, beauty looks, and set designs--and, of course, the top fashion models who wore them on the runway.

    An essential book for anyone interested in fashion, Louis Vuitton offers a complete and unrivaled picture of the collections of the world's top fashion house through original catwalk photography.

  • The Art of French Piano Music - Debussy, Ravel, Faure, Chabrier

    An essential resource for scholars and performers, this study by a world-renowned specialist illuminates the piano music of four major French composers, in comparative and reciprocal context. Howat explores the musical language and artistic ethos of this repertoire, juxtaposing structural analysis with editorial and performing issues. He also relates his four composers historically and stylistically to such predecessors as Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, the French harpsichord school, and Russian and Spanish music.

    Challenging long-held assumptions about performance practice, Howat elucidates the rhythmic vitality and invention inherent in French music. In granting Faure and Chabrier equal consideration with Debussy and Ravel, he redresses a historic imbalance and reshapes our perceptions of this entire musical tradition. Outstanding historical documentation and analysis are supported by Howat's direct references to performing traditions shaped by the composers themselves. The book balances accessibility with scholarly and analytic rigor, combining a lifetime's scholarship with practical experience of teaching and the concert platform

  • Management in France

    The main aim of this book is to provide an analysis of the nature of management in France, placing it in the social and cultural context of the country and looking at the position of French managers along with their education and career development. The formal nature of work relations and the rituals of French business life are examined and the authors look at perceptions of the changes that 1992 may bring. The corporate culture of four leading companies are looked at and throughout the book, recent research and interviews are used to provide practical insights into French management, comparing with management styles in other countries such as the UK.

  • Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India

    A beautiful book that presents nearly four centuries of artistic creation from one of the largest former princely states in India, the kingdom of Marwar-Jodhpur in southwestern Rajasthan​

    Peacock in the Desert traces the evolution of royal identity in the kingdom of Marwar-Jodhpur in southwestern Rajasthan from the 17th century to the establishment of independence after 1947, presenting the area as a microcosm of India's extraordinarily vibrant culture. An international team of contributors has contextualized these regional narratives in relation to external--and even global--forces. The book thus offers a new perspective on the acquisition and commissioning of objects through patronage, diplomacy, matrimonial alliances, trade, and conquest. It sheds fresh light on the influential role of women at the royal courts and examines monarchies as lenses onto cross-cultural relationships, the unrecognized roles of groups marginalized in earlier accounts, cultural heterodoxy, and large-scale multicultural exchange. Exploring these webs of connection, Peacock in the Desert makes a transformative contribution to scholarship. Its multidisciplinary approach to artistic and cultural exchange offers pathbreaking insights, adding crucial chapters to the story of India's royal visual splendor.

  • Hitler at Home

    A revelatory look at the residences of Adolf Hitler, illuminating their powerful role in constructing and promoting the dictator's private persona both within Germany and abroad

    Adolf Hitler's makeover from rabble-rouser to statesman coincided with a series of dramatic home renovations he undertook during the mid-1930s. This provocative book exposes the dictator's preoccupation with his private persona, which was shaped by the aesthetic and ideological management of his domestic architecture. Hitler's bachelor life stirred rumors, and the Nazi regime relied on the dictator's three dwellings--the Old Chancellery in Berlin, his apartment in Munich, and the Berghof, his mountain home on the Obersalzberg--to foster the myth of the Fuhrer as a morally upstanding and refined man. Author Despina Stratigakos also reveals the previously untold story of Hitler's interior designer, Gerdy Troost, through newly discovered archival sources.

    At the height of the Third Reich, media outlets around the world showcased Hitler's homes to audiences eager for behind-the-scenes stories. After the war, fascination with Hitler's domestic life continued as soldiers and journalists searched his dwellings for insights into his psychology. The book's rich illustrations, many previously unpublished, offer readers a rare glimpse into the decisions involved in the making of Hitler's homes and into the sheer power of the propaganda that influenced how the world saw him.

  • Amazing Rare Things - The Art of Natural History in the Age of Discovery

    A gorgeously illustrated volume devoted to the natural history drawings and watercolors of Leonardo da Vinci and other outstanding artists of the Age of Discovery

    From the fifteenth century onwards, as European explorers sailed forth on grand voyages of discovery, their encounters with exotic plants and animals fanned intense scientific interest. Scholars began to examine nature with fresh eyes, and pioneering artists transformed the way nature was seen and understood. In Amazing Rare Things, renowned naturalist and documentary-maker David Attenborough joins with expert colleagues to explore how artists portrayed the natural world during this era of burgeoning scientific interest. The book focuses on an exquisite selection of natural history drawings and watercolors by Leonardo da Vinci, Alexander Marshal, Maria Sibylla Merian, and Mark Catesby, and from the collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo--works all held in the Royal Library at Windsor Castle. Attenborough and his coauthors offer lucid commentary on topics ranging from the 30,000-year history of human drawings of the natural world, to Leonardo's fascination with natural processes, to Catesby's groundbreaking studies that introduced Europeans to the plants and animals of North America. With 160 full color illustrations, this beautiful book will appeal to readers with interests that extend from art and science to history and nature.

  • Bugles and a Tiger: My life in the Gurkhas

    The first of John Master's evocative memoirs about life in the Gurkhas in India on the cusp of WWII

    John Masters was a soldier before he became a bestselling novelist. He went to Sandhurst in 1933 at the age of eighteen and was commissioned into the 4th Gurkha Rifles in time to take part in some of the last campaigns on the turbulent north-west frontier of India.

    John Masters joined a Gurhka regiment on receiving his commission, and his depiction of garrison life and campaigning on the North-West Frontier has never been surpassed. BUGLES AND A TIGER is a matchless evocation of the British Army in India on the eve of the Second World War. Still very much the army depicted by Kipling, it stands on the threshold of a war that will transform the world. This book is the first of three volumes of autobiography that touched a chord in the post-war world.

  • Physiology of Membrane Disorders

    The second edition of Physiology of Membrane Disorders represents an extensive revision and a considerable expansion of the first edition . Yet the purpose ofthe second edition is identical to that of its predecessor, namely, to provide a rational analysis of membrane transport processes in individual membranes, cells, tissues, and organs, which in tum serves as a frame of reference for rationalizing disorders in which derangements of membrane transport processes playa cardinal role in the clinical expression of disease. As in the first edition, this book is divided into a number of individual, but closely related, sections. Part V represents a new section where the problem of transport across epithelia is treated in some detail. Finally, Part VI, which analyzes clinical derangements, has been enlarged appreciably. THE EDITORS xi Preface to the First Edition The purpose of this book is to provide the reader with a rational frame of reference for assessing the pa- thophysiology of those disorders in which derangements of membrane transport processes are a major factor responsible for the clinical manifestations of disease. In the present context, we use the term "membrane transport to refer to those molecular processes whose cardinal function, broadly speaking, is processes" in a catholic sense, the vectorial transfer of molecules-either individually or as ensembles-across biological interfaces, the latter including those interfaces which separate different intracellular compartments, the cellular and extracellular com- partments, and secreted fluids-such as glomerular filtrate-and extracellular fluids.

  • Advances in Coal Spectroscopy

    The past decade has witnessed major advances in our understanding of the chemical composition, structure, and reactivity of the complex organic-rich fossil matter known as "coal. " Nevertheless, important scientific questions concerning molecular weight distributions, degree of crosslinking, typical duster sizes, type of interconnecting bridges, the possible role of a "mobile phase," and the nature of organic sulfur forms remain topics of heated debate. Moreover, there appears to be a notable lack of consensus regarding the overall direction and goals of structural elucidation work. Is it worthwhile to study whole coal samples, or should we separate out the various, more or less well-defined, maceral and mineral constituents before attempting to describe the structural and compositional features of coal at the molecular Ievel? Second, should there be more emphasis on key structural features and average statistical parameters, or is it necessary to identify individual chemical structures in considerable detail? From the developments of the past decade it is clear that advanced spectroscopic techniques are playing an increasingly important role in resolving difficult questions with regard to the chemical structure and composition of coal. Moreover, it has become equally clear that no single spectroscopic approach can provide all the answers but multiple techniques need to be used in a highly integrated and synergistic manner.

  • The Battle of Agincourt

    Published in partnership with the Royal Armouries, this comprehensive, sumptuously illustrated volume provides a defining reassessment of England's legendary victory on the fields of Agincourt on October 25, 1415. Dramatized by William Shakespeare in Henry V, the Battle of Agincourt changed the course of the Hundred Years War and Britain's relationship with her longtime enemy, France. In a remarkable work commemorating the 600th anniversary of arguably the most iconic military engagement of the medieval era, a wide range of experts examine the battle in its political, cultural, and geographical contexts, detailing strategies, tactics, armor, weapons, and fighting techniques while exploring the battlefield experiences of commanders and ordinary soldiers alike. In addition, this all-encompassing study offers deep analyses of many artifacts and aspects of the battle and its aftermath that have rarely been covered in other histories, including the roles of faith and chivalry, the music of the times, and the experiences of women.

  • Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Elements

    Organometallic chemistry belongs to the most rapidly developing area of chemistry today. This is due to the fact that research dealing with the structure of compounds and chemical bonding has been greatly intensified in recent years. Additionally, organometallic compounds have been widely utilized in catalysis, organic synthesis, electronics, etc. This book is based on my lectures concerning basic organometallic chemistry for fourth and fifth year chemistry students and on my lectures concerning advanced organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis for Ph.D. graduate students. Many recent developments in the area of organometallic chemistry as weIl as homogeneous catalysis are presented. Essential research results dealing with a given class of organometallic compounds are discussed briefly. Results of physicochemical research methods of various organometallic compounds as weIl as their synthesis, properties, structures, reactivities, and applications are discussed more thoroughly. The selection of tabulated data is arbitrary because, often, it has been impossible to avoid omissions. Nevertheless, these data can be very helpful in understanding properties of organometaIlic compounds and their reactivities. All physical data are given in SI units; the interatomic distances are given in pm units in figures and tables. I am indebted to Professor S. A. Duraj for translating and editing this book. His remarks, discussions, and suggestions are greatly appreciated. I also express gratitude to Virginia E. Duraj for editing and proofreading.

  • The Tiger in the Smoke: Art and Culture in Post-War Britain

    Taking an interdisciplinary approach that looks at film, television, and commercial advertisements as well as more traditional media such as painting, The Tiger in the Smoke provides an unprecedented analysis of the art and culture of post-war Britain. Art historian Lynda Nead presents fascinating insights into how the Great Fogs of the 1950s influenced the newfound fashion for atmospheric cinematic effects. She also discusses how the widespread use of color in advertisements was part of an increased ideological awareness of racial differences. Tracing the parallel ways that different media developed new methods of creating images that variously harkened back to Victorian ideals, agitated for modern innovations, or redefined domesticity, this book's broad purview gives a complete picture of how the visual culture of post-war Britain expressed the concerns of a society that was struggling to forge a new identity.

  • Enraged: Why Violent Times Need Ancient Greek Myths

    An examination of remedies for violent rage rediscovered in ancient Greek myths

    Millennia ago, Greek myths exposed the dangers of violent rage and the need for empathy and self-restraint. Homer's Iliad, Euripides' Hecuba, and Sophocles' Ajax show that anger and vengeance destroy perpetrators and victims alike. Composed before and during the ancient Greeks' groundbreaking movement away from autocracy toward more inclusive political participation, these stories offer guidelines for modern efforts to create and maintain civil societies. Emily Katz Anhalt reveals how these three masterworks of classical Greek literature can teach us, as they taught the ancient Greeks, to recognize violent revenge as a marker of illogical thinking and poor leadership. These time-honored texts emphasize the costs of our dangerous penchant for glorifying violent rage and those who would indulge in it. By promoting compassion, rational thought, and debate, Greek myths help to arm us against the tyrants we might serve and the tyrants we might become.

  • The Ukrainians - Unexpected Nation, 4e

    The most acute, informed, and up-to-date account available today of Ukraine and its people, now in its fourth edition.

    "An interesting and provocative read, which will, one hopes, contribute to the Western understanding of what Ukraine is and why it matters."--Volodymyr Kulyk, Harvard Ukrainian Studies

    "A spirited and eminently learned investigation of who Ukranians say that they are, how they came to be so, and how others view them. . . . If you re add only one book of Ukraine, this should probably be it."--Elizabeth Luchka Haigh, H-Net Reviews

  • Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery

    For nearly a century British potters have invigorated traditional ceramic forms by developing or reinventing techniques, materials, and means of display. Things of Beauty Growing explores major typologies of the vessel--such as bowl, vase, and charger--that have defined studio ceramics since the early 20th century. It places British studio pottery within the context of objects from Europe, Japan, and Korea and presents essays by an international team of scholars and experts. The book highlights the objects themselves, including new works by Adam Buick, Halima Cassell, and Nao Matsunago, featured alongside works by William Staite Murray, Lucie Rie, Edmund de Waal, and others, many published here for the first time. Rounding out the beautifully illustrated volume is an interview with renowned collector John Driscoll and approximately fifty illustrated short biographies of significant makers.

  • Jasper Johns: Catalogue Raisonné of Painting and Sculpture

    The essential five-volume resource on the painting and sculpture of one of the world's foremost contemporary artists

    For more than 60 years, Jasper Johns (b. 1930) has remained a singular figure in contemporary art. His most widely influential work--depictions of everyday objects and signs such as flags, targets, flashlights, and lightbulbs--helped change the face of the art world in the 1950s by introducing subject matter that stood in contrast to the prevailing style of Abstract Expressionism. In subsequent decades, Johns's art has increasingly engaged issues of memory and mortality, often incorporating references to admired artistic predecessors.

    This definitive 5-volume catalogue raisonne documents the entire body of painting and sculpture made by Johns from 1954 through 2014, encompassing 355 paintings and 86 sculptures. Each work is illustrated with a full-page reproduction, nearly all of which were commissioned expressly for this publication. A decade of research underpins the project, with thorough documentation of each object and an overarching monograph that represents the most comprehensive study of the artist's work to date. All facets of the catalogue reflect the input of the artist, who worked closely with the author at all stages.

  • The Bookshop of the World: Making and Trading Books in the Dutch Golden Age

    The untold story of how the Dutch conquered the European book market and became the world's greatest bibliophiles

    The Dutch Golden Age has long been seen as the age of Rembrandt and Vermeer, whose paintings captured the public imagination and came to represent the marvel that was the Dutch Republic. Yet there is another, largely overlooked marvel in the Dutch world of the seventeenth century: books.

    In this fascinating account, Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen show how the Dutch produced many more books than pictures and bought and owned more books per capita than any other part of Europe. Key innovations in marketing, book auctions, and newspaper advertising brought stability to a market where elsewhere publishers faced bankruptcy, and created a population uniquely well-informed and politically engaged. This book tells for the first time the remarkable story of the Dutch conquest of the European book world and shows the true extent to which these pious, prosperous, quarrelsome, and generous people were shaped by what they read.

  • Brewer's Cabinet of Curiosities

    From the creators of "Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable," considered by many the greatest trivia collection ever, comes another cool collection of fabulous facts, quirky quotes, and unbelievable-but-true happenings. The coverage includes various historic, literary, artistic, and scientific categories--each supplying its share of the bizarre and the hilarious. Some examples: a list of royal nicknames, from William the Bastard (a.k.a. the Conqueror) to Harry Potty (today's irrepressible Prince Harry); the longest and shortest wars, from the 100 Years' War to the Thirty-eight Minutes' War; the ship's cat that won a medal; and why the planet Uranus was nearly officially named George.

  • Virus Variability, Epidemiology, and Control

    Virus Variability and Impact on Epidemiology and Control of Diseases E. Kurstak and A. Hossain I. INTRODUCTION An important number of virus infections and their epidemic developments demonstrate that ineffec- tiveness of prevention measures is often due to the mutation rate and variability of viruses (Kurstak et al., 1984, 1987). The new human immunodeficiency retroviruses and old influenza viruses are only one among several examples of virus variation that prevent, or make very difficult. the production of reliable vaccines. It could be stated that the most important factor limiting the effectiveness of vaccines against virus infections is apparently virus variation. Not much is, how- ever, known about the factors influencing and responsible for the dramatically diverse patterns of virus variability. II. MUTATION RATE AND VARIABILITY OF HUMAN AND ANIMAL VIRUSES Mutation is undoubtedly the primary source of variation, and several reports in the literature suggest that extreme variability of some viruses may be a consequence of an unusually high mutation rate (Holland et al., 1982; Domingo et al., 1985; Smith and Inglis, 1987). The mutation rate of a virus is defined as the probability that during a single replication of the virus genome a particular nucleotide position is altered through substitution, deletion, insertion. or recombination. Different techniques have been utilized to measure virus mutation rates, and these have been noted in the extent of application to different viruses.

  • Neuropsychological Function and Brain Imaging

    Over the past two decades researchers and clinicians in the neurosciences have witnessed a literal information explosion in the area of brain imaging and neuropsychological functioning. Until recently we could not view the nervous system except through the use of invasive procedures. Today, a variety of imaging techniques are available, but this technology has advanced so rapidly that it has been difficult for new information to be consolidated into a single source. The goal of this volume is to present information on technological advances along with current standards and techniques in the area of brain imaging and neuropsychological functioning. The quality of brain imaging techniques has improved dramatically. In 1975 one had to be content with a brain image that only offered a gross distinction between ventricular cavities, brain, and bone tissue. Current imaging techniques offer considerable precision and approximate gross neuroanatomy to such an extent that differentiation between brain nuclei, pathways, and white- gray matter is possible. These technological advances have progressed so rapidly that basic and clinical research have lagged behind. It is not uncommon, particularly in longitudinal research, for the technical meth- odology of a study to become obsolete while that study is still in progress. This has hampered certain aspects of systematic research and has also produced the need for a textbook that could address contemporary issues in brain imaging and neuropsychology.

  • The Wrath of the Gods - Masterpieces by Rubens, Michelangelo, and Titian

    Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) proudly described his monumental painting Prometheus Bound as first among "the flower of my stock." This singular work demonstrates how Rubens engaged with and responded to his predecessors Michelangelo and Titian, with whom he shared an interest in depictions of physical torment. The Wrath of the Gods offers an in-depth case study of the Flemish artist's creative process and aesthetic, while also demonstrating why this particular painting has appealed to viewers over time.

    Many scholars have elaborated on Rubens's affinity for Titian, but his connection to Michelangelo has received far less attention. This study presents a new interpretation of Prometheus Bound, showing how Rubens created parallels between the pagan hero Prometheus and Michelangelo's Risen Christ from the Sistine Chapel's Last Judgment. Christopher D. M. Atkins expands our understanding of artistic transmission by elucidating how Rubens synthesized the works he saw in Italy, Spain, and his native Antwerp, and how Prometheus Bound in turn influenced Dutch, Flemish, and Italian artists. By emulating Rubens's composition, these artists circulated it throughout Europe, broadening its influence from his day to ours.

  • Fourier, Hadamard, and Hilbert Transforms in Chemistry

    In virtually all types of experiments in which a response is analyzed as a function of frequency (e. g., a spectrum), transform techniques can significantly improve data acquisition and/or data reduct ion. Research-level nuclear magnet ic resonance and infra-red spectra are already obtained almost exclusively by Fourier transform methods, because Fourier transform NMR and IR spectrometers have been commercially available since the late 1960-s. Similar transform techniques are equally valuable (but less well-known) for a wide range of other chemical applications for which commercial instruments are only now becoming available: for example, the first corrmercial Fourier transform mass spectrometer was introduced this year (1981) by Nicolet Instrument Corporation. The purpose of this volume is to acquaint practicing chemists with the basis, advantages, and applica- of Fourier, Hadamard, and Hilbert transforms in chemistry. For tions almost all chapters, the author is the investigator who was the first to apply such methods in that field. The basis and advantages of transform techniques are described in Chapter 1. Many of these aspects were understood and first applied by infrared astronomers in the 1950-s, in order to improve the otherwise unacceptably poor signal-to-noise ratio of their spec- tra. However, the computations required to reduce the data were painfully slow, and required a 1 arge computer.

  • Weapons of Tomorrow

    Proceedings of an American Society Symposium held in Orlando, Florida, August 25-30 1996

  • The Empire of the Eagle: An Illustrated Natural History

    A lavishly illustrated celebration of each of the world's sixty-eight currently recognized eagle species in all their magnificence and beguiling diversity

    Eagles hold a unique allure among birds for their combination of power, grace, and predatory prowess. Captivating the human imagination, these raptors have symbolized pride, freedom, and independence of spirit since humankind's earliest times. This book, unlike any previous volume, encompasses each of the world's sixty-eight currently recognized eagle species, from the huge Steller's Sea-eagle that soars above Japan's winter ice floes to the diminutive Little Eagle that hunts over the Australian outback. Mike Unwin's vivid and authoritative descriptions combined with stunning photographs taken or curated by David Tipling deliver a fascinating and awe-inspiring volume.

    Featuring chapters organized by habitat, the book investigates the lifestyle and unique adaptations of each eagle species, as well as the significance of eagles in world cultures and the threats they face from humans. A gorgeous appreciation of eagles, this book will dazzle both eye and imagination.

  • Fundamental Problems of Gauge Field Theory

    The sixth Ettore Majorana International School of Mathematical Physics was held at the Centro della Cultura Scientifica Erice, Sicily, 1-14 July 1985. The present volume collects lecture notes on the ses- sion which was devoted to Fundamental Problems of Gauge Field Theory. The School was a NATO Advanced Study Institute sponsored by the Italian Ministry of Public Education, the Italian Ministry of Scientific and Technological Research and the Regional Sicilian Government. As a result of the experimental and theoretical developments of the last two decades, gauge field theory, in one form or another, now pro- vides the standard language for the description of Nature; QCD and the standard model of the electroweak interactions illustrate this point. It is a basic task of mathematical physics to provide a solid foundation for these developments by putting the theory in a physically transparent and mathematically rigorous form. The lectures and seminars of the school concentrated on the many unsolved problems which arise here, and on the general ideas and methods which have been proposed for their solution. In particular, we mention the use of rigorous renormalization group methods to obtain control over the continuum limit of lattice gauge field theories, the explora- tion of the extraordinary enigmatic connections between Kac-Moody- Virasoro algebras and string theory, and the systematic use of the theory of local algebras and indefinite metric spaces to classify the charged C* states in gauge field theories.

  • Radical Sacrifice

    A trenchant analysis of sacrifice as the foundation of the modern, as well as the ancient, social order

    The modern conception of sacrifice is at once cast as a victory of self-discipline over desire and condescended to as destructive and archaic abnegation. But even in the Old Testament, the dual natures of sacrifice, embodying both ritual slaughter and moral rectitude, were at odds. In this analysis, Terry Eagleton makes a compelling argument that the idea of sacrifice has long been misunderstood.

    Pursuing the complex lineage of sacrifice in a lyrical discourse, Eagleton focuses on the Old and New Testaments, offering a virtuosic analysis of the crucifixion, while drawing together a host of philosophers, theologians, and texts--from Hegel, Nietzsche, and Derrida to the Aeneid and The Wings of the Dove. Brilliant meditations on death and eros, Shakespeare and St. Paul, irony and hybridity explore the meaning of sacrifice in modernity, casting off misperceptions of barbarity to reconnect the radical idea to politics and revolution.

  • Mary Cassatt: An American Impressionist in Paris

    A beautifully illustrated rediscovery of a distinguished American artist

    Acclaimed and beloved for her paintings of women and children in intimate, informal settings, Mary Cassatt (1844-1926) was the only American artist to exhibit with the French Impressionists in Paris. Cassatt celebrated women in an age of rapid female advancement, and she explained her affinity for depicting children, saying they are "natural and truthful," two of the qualities that her generation of artists was energetically pursuing. This beautiful book, edited by a preeminent Cassatt scholar, brings together more than sixty important works that span the entirety of Cassatt's career. Included here are works across all media in which Cassatt worked--oils, pastels, drawings, and prints--as well as numerous documentary sources that combine to convey a full and nuanced account of Cassatt as an American artist in Paris.

    Some of these works, such as Little Girl in a Blue Armchair (1878) and Woman Bathing (1890-91) are familiar; others are from private collections and have been reproduced rarely, if ever. The result is a fresh look at Cassatt that reaffirms her importance to French Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, celebrates her resilience in the male-dominated worlds of French and American art, and demonstrates her ability to reconcile the different realms in which she lived and worked.

  • William the Conqueror

    Fifteen years in the making, a landmark reinterpretation of the life of a pivotal figure in British and European history

    In this magisterial addition to the Yale English Monarchs series, David Bates combines biography and a multidisciplinary approach to examine the life of a major figure in British and European history. Using a framework derived from studies of early medieval kingship, he assesses each phase of William's life to establish why so many trusted William to invade England in 1066 and the consequences of this on the history of the so-called Norman Conquest after the Battle of Hastings and for generations to come.

    A leading historian of the period, Bates is notable for having worked extensively in the archives of northern France and discovered many eleventh- and twelfth-century charters largely unnoticed by English-language scholars. Taking an innovative approach, he argues for a move away from old perceptions and controversies associated with William's life and the Norman Conquest. This deeply researched volume is the scholarly biography for our generation.

  • Reach for the Sky

    The bestselling story of Britain's most courageous and most famous flyer, the Second World War hero Sir Douglas Bader.

    In 1931, at the age of 21, Douglas Bader was the golden boy of the RAF. Excelling in everything he did he represented the Royal Air Force in aerobatics displays, played rugby for Harlequins, and was tipped to be the next England fly half. But one afternoon in December all his ambitions came to an abrupt end when he crashed his plane doing a particularly difficult and illegal aerobatic trick. His injuries were so bad that surgeons were forced to amputate both his legs to save his life. Douglas Bader did not fly again until the outbreak of the Second World War, when his undoubted skill in the air was enough to convince a desperate air force to give him his own squadron.

    The rest of his story is the stuff of legend. Flying Hurricanes in the Battle of Britain he led his squadron to kill after kill, keeping them all going with his unstoppable banter. Shot down in occupied France, his German captors had to confiscate his tin legs in order to stop him trying to escape. Bader faced it all, disability, leadership and capture, with the same charm, charisma and determination that was an inspiration to all around him.

  • Urolithiasis

    This volume comprises the proceedings of the sixth in a series of International Symposia devoted to basic and clinical aspects of urolithiasis. Previous symposia have been held at intervals of four years in Leeds, Madrid, Davos, Williamsburg, and Garmisch-Partenkirchen. The sixth symposium was held in Vancouver, British Columbia and was attended by over 250 participants from 26 countries around the world. As may be seen from the contents of this volume, the meeting covered many aspects of urolithiasis including the underlying physiology, crystal formation and the effects of inhibitors and promoters on crystallization, endocrinology and abnormalities of urinary composition, analyses, geography and epidemiology, and medical and surgical treatment with a special emphasis on extracorporeal lithotripsy. Internationally-recognized authorities gave invited talks in each of these areas, and from the submitted abstracts 30 were selected for oral presentation and the remainder were presented in either general or theme poster sessions. The nine theme-poster sessions provided a particularly valuable and successful feature of the meeting, giving an opportunity for a group of researchers working in related areas to present their posters and also to give a brief oral summary which was followed by discussion with the audience. Each of these poster sessions was chaired by two experts in the field who have provided an overview of each theme-poster session for this volume.

  • Rome 1600 - The City and the Visual Arts under Clement VIII

    In 1600 Rome was the center of the artistic world. This fascinating book offers a new look at the art and architecture of the great Baroque city at this time of major innovation--especially in painting, largely owing to the presence of Annibale Carracci (1560-1609) and Caravaggio (1571-1610). Rome was a magnet for artists and architects from all over Europe; they came to study the remains of antiquity and the works of Michelangelo, Raphael, and Bramante. The sheer variety of artists working in the city ensured a diversity of styles and innovative cross-influences. Moreover, 1600 was a Jubilee year, offering numerous opportunities for artistic patronage, whether in major projects like St. Peter's, or in lesser schemes such as the restoration of older churches. Clare Robertson examines these developments as well as the patronage of the pope and of major Roman families, drawing on a range of contemporary sources and images to reconstruct a snapshot of Rome at this thrilling time.

  • Wyeth - Andrew and Jamie in the Studio

    An essential new look at the diverse work and artistic methods of beloved American realist painters Andrew and Jamie Wyeth

    Father and son artists Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) and Jamie Wyeth (b. 1946) are among the most celebrated American realist painters of the 20th century. Despite their similar habits of mind, studio practice, and rural Pennsylvania upbringing, the two artists produced strikingly different work. However, they also employed a wide range of processes in works that parallel and complement each other. This artistic conversation is evident when considering the artists' vast output of preliminary work--much of which has remained unpublished until now--alongside their iconic paintings.

    This groundbreaking publication takes a novel approach in exploring the Wyeths' working methods and processes. Author Timothy J. Standring also provides the reader with a rare personal glimpse into the artists' world by chronicling his visits to their studios in the Brandywine Valley and Midcoast Maine over the course of four years. With over 200 color illustrations showing works in a variety of media--including pen and ink, graphite, chalk, watercolor, dry brush, tempera, and oil--this handsome book situates each artist's oeuvre in the context of their shared biographies, place, and artistic practices.

  • The Lions' Den: Zionism and the Left from Hannah Arendt to Noam Chomsky

    A lively intellectual history that explores how prominent midcentury public intellectuals approached Zionism and then the State of Israel itself and its conflicts with the Arab world

    In this lively intellectual history of the political Left, cultural critic Susie Linfield investigates how eight prominent twentieth-century intellectuals struggled with the philosophy of Zionism, and then with Israel and its conflicts with the Arab world. Constructed as a series of interrelated portraits that combine the personal and the political, the book includes philosophers, historians, journalists, and activists such as Hannah Arendt, Arthur Koestler, I. F. Stone, and Noam Chomsky. In their engagement with Zionism, these influential thinkers also wrestled with the twentieth century's most crucial political dilemmas: socialism, nationalism, democracy, colonialism, terrorism, and anti-Semitism. In other words, in probing Zionism, they confronted the very nature of modernity and the often catastrophic histories of our time. By examining these leftist intellectuals, Linfield also seeks to understand how the contemporary Left has become focused on anti-Zionism and how Israel itself has moved rightward.

  • Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable, 17th edition

    Long established as the ultimate reference for anyone with an interest in the English language, Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable features tens of thousands of encyclopedic entries examining the origins and significance of popular words, phrases, allusions and cultural references. Its delightfully diverse content includes cultural, historical and mythological references, beliefs and customs, proper names, literary characters, idioms and slang. First published in 1870 and now in its 17th edition, this ever-popular collection has moved with the times to include such up-to-date material as Beckingham Palace, Hogwarts and bling alongside wonderful stories from past and present.

  • I Think I Am a Verb: More Contributions to the Doctrine of Signs

    My writing career has been, at least in this one respect, idiosyncratic: it had to mark and chart, step by step, its own peculiar champaign. My earliest papers, beginning in 1942, were technical articles in this or that domain of Uralic linguistics, ethnography, and folklore, with a sprinkling of contributions to North and South American linguistics. In 1954, my name became fecklessly associated with psycholinguistics, then, successively, with explorations in my- thology, religious studies, and stylistic problems. It now takes special effort for me to even revive the circumstances under which I came to publish, in 1955, a hefty tome on the supernatural, another, in 1958, on games, and yet another, in 1961, utilizing a computer for extensive sorting of literary information. By 1962, I had edged my way into animal communication studies. Two years after that, I first whiffled through what Gavin Ewart evocatively called "the tulgey wood of semiotics." In 1966, I published three books which tem- porarily bluffed some of my friends into conjecturing that I was about to meta- morphose into a historiographer of linguistics. The topmost layer in my scholarly stratification dates from 1976, when I started to compile what eventually became my "semiotic tetralogy," of which this volume may supposably be the last. In the language of "Jabberwocky," the word "tulgey" is said to connote variability and evasiveness. This notwithstanding, the allusion seems to me apt.

  • That Day - Photographs in the American West

    "Rather than the proverbial melting pot, Wilson asks us to recognize a West that is at least a place where, against a backdrop of aridity and expansive space, diverse lives can and do coexist." --John Rohrbach

    Renowned photographer Laura Wilson has captured the majesty, as well as the tragedy, of her home region of Texas and the wider West for more than three decades. A former assistant to Richard Avedon, she has published her work to wide acclaim over the past twenty-five years. As seen in this extraordinary book, Wilson's subjects range from legendary West Texas cattle ranches to impoverished Plains Indian reservations to lavish border-town cotillions. Also featured are compelling portraits of artists who are associated with the region, including Donald Judd, Ed Ruscha, and Sam Shepard.

    The unforgettable images in That Day, most of which are previously unpublished, tell sharply drawn stories of the people and places that have shaped, and continue to shape, the nation's most dynamic and unyielding land. Text from Wilson's journals accompanies the photographs, recalling her personal experiences behind the camera at the moment when a particular image was captured. With her incisive eye, Wilson casts a fresh light on the West--a topic of enduring fascination.

  • Gut Reactions

    How best to deal with such benign problems as the irritable bowel syndrome, diverticula, heartburn, non-ulcer dyspepsia, and gas, among other ailments. For a general audience.

  • Atoms and Light: Interactions

    This book discusses the interaction of light with atoms, concentrating on the semiclassical descriptions of the processes. It begins by discussing the classical theory of electromagnetic radiation and its interaction with a classical charged dipole oscillator. Then, in a pivotal chapter, the interaction with a free charge is described (the Compton effect); it is shown that, in order to give agreement with observation, certain quantum rules must be introduced. The book then proceeds to discuss the interaction from this point of view-light always being described classically, atoms described quantum-mechanically, with quantum rules for the interaction. Subsequent chapters deal with stimulated emission and absorption, spontaneous emission and decay, the general problem of light stimulating and being scattered from the two-state atom, the photoelectric effect, and photoelectric counting statistics. Finally the author gives a personal view on the nature of light and his own way of looking at certain paradoxes. The writing of this book was originally conceived as a collaboration between the present author and a colleague of former years, Alan V. Durrant. Indeed, some preliminary exchange of ideas took place in the mid-1970s. But the problems of joint-authorship from antipodean positions proved too difficult and the project was abandoned. I would like to record my indebted- ness to him for the stimulation of this early association. I also acknowledge the encouragement of my colleagues at the Univer- sity of Otago. Special reference must be made to D. M.

  • The Anglo-Saxon World

    The Anglo-Saxon period, stretching from the fifth to the late eleventh century, begins with the Roman retreat from the Western world and ends with the Norman takeover of England. Between these epochal events, many of the contours and patterns of English life that would endure for the next millennium were shaped. In this authoritative work, N. J. Higham and M. J. Ryan reexamine Anglo-Saxon England in the light of new research in disciplines as wide ranging as historical genetics, paleobotany, archaeology, literary studies, art history, and numismatics. The result is the definitive introduction to the Anglo-Saxon world, enhanced with a rich array of photographs, maps, genealogies, and other illustrations. The Anglo-Saxon period witnessed the birth of the English people, the establishment of Christianity, and the development of the English language. With an extraordinary cast of characters (Alfred the Great, the Venerable Bede, King Cnut), a long list of artistic and cultural achievements (Beowulf, the Sutton Hoo ship-burial finds, the Bayeux Tapestry), and multiple dramatic events (the Viking invasions, the Battle of Hastings), the Anglo-Saxon era lays legitimate claim to having been one of the most important in Western history.

  • Foliage Plants

    Foliage plays a key part in garden design. The colour, and therefore the effect, of the plant is determined by its foliage all the time it is in leaf, whereas the flowers may last only a few days. Choosing plants for different kinds of foliage effects can mean year-round interest in the garden. This book describes the range of colour and leaf shape available, provides a detailed plant list organized by colour, recommends planting positions and gives a list of nurseries.

  • France

    Part of a series of practical guides for business travellers, combining language reference with a directory of contact addresses and facts and statistics, this volume focuses on France. The language section includes specialist words and phrases aranged by topic: eg advertising, conferences, complaints, insurance and accounting, as well as general vocabulary for everyday situations. Featured are over 150 addresses providing the contacts needed when preparing your trip, as well as hands-on references in France. There is advice on French business etiquette and customs and a number of sample letters for different business needs. It also includes a compendium of facts and statistics on the Single European Market.

  • British Silver - State Hermitage Museum Catalogue

    Despite its comparatively small size--just over 370 items, dating mainly from the 18th century--the collection of British silver in the Hermitage is renowned for its variety and quality. Over the course of the 18th and 19th centuries, the introduction of European dining habits and Russian Anglophilia contributed to the acquisition of large quantities of British silver. Most of the pieces were functional rather than decorative, such as dinner or toilet services specially commissioned by members of the imperial family and the aristocracy.

    Marking the 250th anniversary of the State Hermitage Museum, this catalogue offers a grand presentation of these glorious silver items, supported by new research and documents. In her introduction, Marina Lopato details the complexities of Russian and Hermitage history to set the scene for the objects. Sumptuous illustrations showcase the exceptional nature of the Hermitage's British silver, most evident in four monumental wine coolers that are among the best known pieces of British silver anywhere in the world.

  • Matrix Theory: A Second Course

    Linear algebra and matrix theory are essentially synonymous terms for an area of mathematics that has become one of the most useful and pervasive tools in a wide range of disciplines. It is also a subject of great mathematical beauty. In consequence of both of these facts, linear algebra has increasingly been brought into lower levels of the curriculum, either in conjunction with the calculus or separate from it but at the same level. A large and still growing number of textbooks has been written to satisfy this need, aimed at students at the junior, sophomore, or even freshman levels. Thus, most students now obtaining a bachelor's degree in the sciences or engineering have had some exposure to linear algebra. But rarely, even when solid courses are taken at the junior or senior levels, do these students have an adequate working knowledge of the subject to be useful in graduate work or in research and development activities in government and industry. In particular, most elementary courses stop at the point of canonical forms, so that while the student may have "seen" the Jordan and other canonical forms, there is usually little appreciation of their usefulness. And there is almost never time in the elementary courses to deal with more specialized topics like nonnegative matrices, inertia theorems, and so on. In consequence, many graduate courses in mathematics, applied mathe- matics, or applications develop certain parts of matrix theory as needed.

  • Secular Buddhism: Imagining the Dharma in an Uncertain World

    An essential collection of Stephen Batchelor's most probing and important work on secular Buddhism

    As the practice of mindfulness permeates mainstream Western culture, more and more people are engaging in a traditional form of Buddhist meditation. However, many of these people have little interest in the religious aspects of Buddhism, and the practice occurs within secular contexts such as hospitals, schools, and the workplace. Is it possible to recover from the Buddhist teachings a vision of human flourishing that is secular rather than religious without compromising the integrity of the tradition? Is there an ethical framework that can underpin and contextualize these practices in a rapidly changing world?

    In this collected volume of Stephen Batchelor's writings on these themes, the author explores the complex implications of Buddhism's secularization. Ranging widely--from reincarnation, religious belief, and agnosticism to the role of the arts in Buddhist practice--he offers a detailed picture of contemporary Buddhism and its attempt to find a voice in the modern world.

  • City Unseen: New Visions of an Urban Planet

    Stunning satellite images of one hundred cities show our urbanizing planet in a new light to reveal the fragile relationship between humanity and Earth

    Seeing cities around the globe in their larger environmental contexts, we begin to understand how the world shapes urban landscapes and how urban landscapes shape the world. Authors Karen Seto and Meredith Reba provide these revealing views to enhance readers' understanding of the shape, growth, and life of urban settlements of all sizes--from the remote town of Namche Bazaar in Nepal to the vast metropolitan prefecture of Tokyo, Japan.

    Using satellite data, the authors show urban landscapes in new perspectives. The book's beautiful and surprising images pull back the veil on familiar scenes to highlight the growth of cities over time, the symbiosis between urban form and natural landscapes, and the vulnerabilities of cities to the effects of climate change. We see the growth of Las Vegas and Lagos, the importance of rivers to both connecting and dividing cities like Seoul and London, and the vulnerability of Fukushima and San Juan to floods from tsunami or hurricanes. The result is a compelling book that shows cities' relationships with geography, food, and society.

  • In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and Its Ironies

    A leading contrarian thinker explores the ethical paradox at the heart of history's wounds

    The conventional wisdom about historical memory is summed up in George Santayana's celebrated phrase, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Today, the consensus that it is moral to remember, immoral to forget, is nearly absolute. And yet is this right?

    David Rieff, an independent writer who has reported on bloody conflicts in Africa, the Balkans, and Central Asia, insists that things are not so simple. He poses hard questions about whether remembrance ever truly has, or indeed ever could, "inoculate" the present against repeating the crimes of the past. He argues that rubbing raw historical wounds--whether self-inflicted or imposed by outside forces--neither remedies injustice nor confers reconciliation. If he is right, then historical memory is not a moral imperative but rather a moral option--sometimes called for, sometimes not. Collective remembrance can be toxic. Sometimes, Rieff concludes, it may be more moral to forget.

    Ranging widely across some of the defining conflicts of modern times--the Irish Troubles and the Easter Uprising of 1916, the white settlement of Australia, the American Civil War, the Balkan wars, the Holocaust, and 9/11--Rieff presents a pellucid examination of the uses and abuses of historical memory. His contentious, brilliant, and elegant essay is an indispensable work of moral philosophy.

  • Aberdeenshire: South and Aberdeen

    The second of two books exploring the buildings of the north-east of Scotland, this volume surveys Aberdeen - the nation's third-largest city - and the southern area of Aberdeenshire, including the former county of Kincardineshire. Among Aberdeen's architectural highlights are the great medieval cathedral and burgh church of St Nicholas, the buildings of King's College, and magnificent civic, commercial and domestic buildings of the Victorian and Edwardian age. In addition, the book showcases not only Aberdeenshire's greatest houses and castles including Crathes, Craigievar and Balmoral, the royal family's Scottish estate, but also buildings and monuments as varied in scale and type as prehistoric hillforts, Georgian town houses, rural churches, fishing lodges and textile mills.

    Both volumes are comprehensively illustrated with specially commissioned colour photography.

  • Atom-Molecule Collision Theory: A Guide for the Experimentalist

    The broad field of molecular collisions is one of considerable current interest, one in which there is a great deal of research activity, both experi- mental and theoretical. This is probably because elastic, inelastic, and reactive intermolecular collisions are of central importance in many of the fundamental processes of chemistry and physics. One small area of this field, namely atom-molecule collisions, is now beginning to be "understood" from first principles. Although the more general subject of the collisions of polyatomic molecules is of great im- portance and intrinsic interest, it is still too complex from the viewpoint of theoretical understanding. However, for atoms and simple molecules the essential theory is well developed, and computational methods are sufficiently advanced that calculations can now be favorably compared with experimental results. This "coming together" of the subject (and, incidentally, of physicists and chemists !), though still in an early stage, signals that the time is ripe for an appraisal and review of the theoretical basis of atom-molecule collisions. It is especially important for the experimentalist in the field to have a working knowledge of the theory and computational methods required to describe the experimentally observable behavior of the system. By now many of the alternative theoretical approaches and computational procedures have been tested and intercompared. More-or-Iess optimal methods for dealing with each aspect are emerging. In many cases working equations, even schematic algorithms, have been developed, with assumptions and caveats delineated.

  • Fishing: How the Sea Fed Civilization

    Humanity's last major source of food from the wild, and how it enabled and shaped the growth of civilization

    In this history of fishing--not as sport but as sustenance--archaeologist and best-selling author Brian Fagan argues that fishing was an indispensable and often overlooked element in the growth of civilization. It sustainably provided enough food to allow cities, nations, and empires to grow, but it did so with a different emphasis. Where agriculture encouraged stability, fishing demanded movement. It frequently required a search for new and better fishing grounds; its technologies, centered on boats, facilitated movement and discovery; and fish themselves, when dried and salted, were the ideal food--lightweight, nutritious, and long-lasting--for traders, travelers, and conquering armies. This history of the long interaction of humans and seafood tours archaeological sites worldwide to show readers how fishing fed human settlement, rising social complexity, the development of cities, and ultimately the modern world.

  • Beowulf

    A widely celebrated translator's vivid, accessible, and elegantly concise rendering of an ancient English masterpiece

    Beowulf tells the story of a Scandinavian hero who defeats three evil creatures--a huge, cannibalistic ogre named Grendel, Grendel's monstrous mother, and a dragon--and then dies, mortally wounded during his last encounter. If the definition of a superhero is "someone who uses his special powers to fight evil," then Beowulf is our first English superhero story, and arguably our best. It is also a deeply pious poem, so bold in its reverence for a virtuous pagan past that it teeters on the edge of heresy. From beginning to end, we feel we are in the hands of a master storyteller.

    Stephen Mitchell's marvelously clear and vivid rendering re-creates the robust masculine music of the original. It both hews closely to the meaning of the Old English and captures its wild energy and vitality, not just as a deep "work of literature" but also as a rousing entertainment that can still stir our feelings and rivet our attention today, after more than a thousand years. This new translation--spare, sinuous, vigorous in its narration, and translucent in its poetry--makes a masterpiece accessible to everyone.

  • Every Other Thursday - Stories and Strategies from Successful Women Scientists

    This book tells the story of a professional problem-solving group that for more than 25 years has empowered its members by providing practical and emotional support. The objective of 'Group', as Ellen Daniell and six other members call their bi-monthly gatherings, is cooperation in a competitive world. And the objective of Every Other Thursday is to encourage those who feel isolated or stressed in a work or academic setting to consider the benefits of such a group - a group in which everyone is on your side. Each of the high-achieving individuals in Group (they include members of the National Academy of Sciences, a senior scientist at a prestigious research institute, university professors and administrators) has found the support of the others to be an essential part of her own success. Daniell provides detailed examples of how members help one another navigate career setbacks or other difficulties. She shows that group support, discussion, and application of common experience bring to light practical solutions and broader perspectives. In an inspirational conclusion, the author offers advice and practical guidelines for those who would like to establish a group of their own.

  • Atomic Photoeffect

    This book is devoted to the investigation of a rather prevalent process in nature: interaction of atoms with electromagnetic radiation. Primary attention is given to the low and intermediate photon energy region, from tens to hundreds of electron-volts. It is in this region that the probability of photon absorption and photoionization is largest. Data in this energy region are very interesting and useful in astrophysics and plasma physics, solid-state physics and quantum electronics, and in a number of other branches of science and technical applications. Formulae for hydrogen atom photoionization are given in almost all textbooks on quantum mechanics. Together with the limited amounts of experimental data available up to the beginning of the sixties, the formulae gave an impression of the completeness of the study of photoionization, of the absolute clarity of the mechanism of the process, and of the possibility of calculating rather easily its probability using the formulae.

  • Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China

    A richly illustrated book featuring recent revelations about China's first emperor, Ying Zheng, and his famous burial site containing an army of life-size terracotta soldiers and other artifacts

    First discovered by a farmer in 1974, the burial site of China's first emperor, Ying Zheng, has yielded thousands of life-size terracotta figures and artifacts, and continues to be excavated today. This fascinating publication features more than 130 works including ten of these majestic terracotta figures, arms and armor, horse and chariot fittings, ritual bronze vessels, works in gold and silver, jade ornaments, precious jewelry, and ceramics.

    Dating from the Eastern Zhou dynasty (770-256 BC) through the Qin dynasty (221-206 BC), these objects represent the complex history, myths, and burial customs of ancient China. The texts introduce recent scholarship on this material culture to illuminate not only the first emperor's burial complex, but also his powerful influence in Chinese history and the myriad ways in which his political and economic reforms transformed the daily lives of the Chinese people.

  • The Golden Rules for Rubber Bridge Players

    Rubber bridge is the world's most widely played social game with a huge following of people of all ages and interests. This book aims to show how bidding and play in rubber bridge differs from duplicate, in a series of clearly expressed rules.

    Whether you want to win more often, to find playing even more enjoyable or simply to impress your friends, you can be sure that The Golden Rules for Rubber Bridge Players has something to offer you.

  • Early Chinese Jades in the Harvard Art Museums

    Showcasing Harvard's esteemed Grenville L. Winthrop Collection, this volume is a revelatory look at the history of jade and jade working in Chinese art and culture.

  • Gaugin : Artist as Alchemist

    An unprecedented exploration of Gauguin's works in various media, from works on paper to clay and furniture

    Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) was a creative force above and beyond his legendary work as a painter. Surveying the full scope of his career-spanning experiments in different media and formats--clay, works on paper, wood, and paint, as well as furniture and decorative friezes--this volume delves into his enduring interest in craft and applied arts, reflecting on their significance to his creative process. Gauguin: Artist as Alchemist draws on extensive new research into the artist's working methods, presenting him as a consummate craftsman--one whose transmutations of the ordinary yielded new and remarkable forms.

    Beautifully designed and illustrated, this book includes essays by an international team of scholars who offer a rich analysis of Gauguin's oeuvre beyond painting. By embracing other art forms, which offered fewer dominant models to guide his work, Gauguin freed himself from the burden of artistic precedent. In turn, these groundbreaking creative forays, especially in ceramics, gave new direction to his paintings. The authors' insightful emphasis on craftsmanship deepens our understanding of Gauguin's considerable achievements as a painter, draftsman, sculptor, ceramist, and printmaker within the history of modern art.

  • Cathodoluminescence Microscopy of Inorganic Solids

    Microcharacterization of materials is a rapidly advancing field. Among the many electron and ion probe techniques, the cathodoluminescence mode of an electron probe instrument has reached a certain maturity, which is reflected by an increas- ing number of publications in this field. The rapid rate of progress in applications of cathodoluminescence techniques in characterizing inorganic solids has been especially noticeable in recent years. The main purpose of the book is to outline the applications of cath- odoluminescence techniques in the assessment of optical and electronic proper- ties of inorganic solids, such as semiconductors, phosphors, ceramics, and min- erals. The assessment provides, for example, information on impurity levels derived from cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, analysis of dopant concentra- tions at a level that, in some cases, is several orders of magnitude lower than that attainable by x-ray microanalysis, the mapping of defects, and the determination of carrier lifetimes and the charge carrier capture cross sections of impurities. In order to make the book self-contained, some basic concepts of solid-state phys- ics, as well as various cathodoluminescence techniques and the processes leading to luminescence phenomena in inorganic solids, are also described. We hope that this book will be useful to both scientists and graduate students interested in microcharacterization of inorganic solids. This book, however, was not intended as a definitive account of cathodoluminescence analysis of in- organic solids. In considering the results presented here, readers should re- member that many materials have properties that vary widely as a function of preparation conditions.

  • Opioid Analgescis: Chemistry and Receptors

    The rapidly burgeoning research of the past two decades on agonist-antagonist analgesics and opioid receptors makes this exhaustive review of opioid anal- gesics particularly relevant and timely. After an introductory chapter the additional 12 chapters begin logically with morphine and congeners (4- epoxymorphinans) and end with opioid receptors. All principal chemical types of centrally acting analgesics (including endogenous opioid-like substances) and their antagonists as well as the mixed agonist-antagonists are treated thoroughly, although not always (and for good reason) in historical (chrono- logical) order. A chapter on miscellaneous types (atypical structures for the most part) includes the benzimidazoles (etonitazene), aminotetralins (dezocine), tetrahydroisoquinolines (methopholine), and so on. Important aspects and correlations of chemistry, pharmacology, and biochemistry are discussed in depth. Literature citations are numerous. For educators, practicing laboratory scientists, and physicians, this scholarly review by two authors well of opioid analgesics versed in the chemistry, pharmacology, and biochemistry will be informative, stimulating, and thought-provoking. Everette L. May Medical College of Virginia Richmond, VA 23298 v Preface The history of opium predates the written word, although knowledge of its constituents dates back less than 200 years. Over the centuries its popularity for the relief of pain has waxed and waned, until today the opiates are widely recognized as excellent analgesics but with disadvantages that have impaired their use seriously. There is a clear need for a potent analgesic with minimal effects on the respiratory centers and gastrointestinal tract and preferably devoid of dependence liability.

  • Modern Concepts in Gastroenterology

    Once again the gastroenterologists of northwestern Canada have come out with a series of essays advancing important modem concepts. As indefatigable as ever, they bring together the latest in clinical-pathophysiological considera- tions for the clinician. The topics run the gamut from the lovely liver to HIV infection, from the pathophysiology of bile flow to comments on antigens in colorectal cancer. It is always easy to publish a first volume, for enthusiasm is high and everyone is anxious to win a place. Bringing out a second volume, the carrying forward of a good idea, is so much harder. In many ways this second volume in the series marks the coming of age of Canadian gastroenterology, as 11 of the 21 contributors currently reside in Canada. Still, the contributions from the United Kingdom and the United States make this an Anglo-American festival. Reading the chapters will make you appreciate the care with which the contributors have garnered recent references to give up-to-date practical infor- mation for us all. I enjoyed all that I read. My congratulations to Drs. Shaffer and Thomson for a job well done. Howard M. Spiro, M.D. New Haven, Connecticut ix Preface This book is based on papers presented at the third symposium on Recent Ad- vances in Gastroenterology held by the Canadian Association of Gastroenter- ology. The proposed audience for this volume is the internist and the general surgeon, as well as those in the specialties of gastroenterology and hepatology.

  • The Reticuloendothelial System: A Comprehensive Treatise, Part B : Physiology

    This comprehensive treatise on the reticuloendothelial system is a project jointly shared by individual members of the Reticuloendothelial (RE) Society and bio- medical scientists in general who are interested in the intricate system of cells and molecular moieties derived from those cells which constitute the RES. It may now be more fashionable in some quarters to consider these cells as part of what is called the mononuclear phagocytic system or the lymphoreticular sys- tem. Nevertheless, because of historical developments and current interest in the subject by investigators from many diverse areas, it seems advantageous to present in one comprehensive treatise current information and knowledge con- cerning basic aspects of the RES, such as morphology, biochemistry, phylogeny and ontogeny, physiology, and pharmacology as well as clinical areas including immunopathology, cancer, infectious diseases, allergy, and hypersensitivity. It is anticipated that by presenting information concerning these apparently het- erogeneous topics under the unifying umbrella of the RES attention will be focused on the similarities as well as interactions among the cell types constitut- ing the RES from the viewpoint of various disciplines. The treatise editors and their editorial board, consisting predominantly of the editors of individual vol- umes, are extremely grateful for the enthusiastic cooperation and enormous task undertaken by members of the biomedical community in general and especially by members of the American as well as European and Japanese Reticuloen- dothelial Societies.

  • Electrochemical Synthesis of Inorganic Compounds: A Bibliography

    Electrochemical synthesis of inorganic compounds is a relatively unknown field. The successful, large industrial processes, such as chlorine-caustic production, are well known, but the large number of other compounds that have been synthesized electrochemically are much less appreciated, even by electrochemists and inorganic chemists. The last comprehensive book on this subject was published in the 1930's and no modern review or summary of the whole field is in existence. But the field is in no way dormant, as attested by the large number of publications, undiminished throughout the years, describing new syntheses and improvements of old ones. Indeed, it can be expected that practical applications of electrochemical inor- ganic syntheses will increase in the future as an increasing portion of our energy will be available in electrical form. Electrochemical processes have important advantages over chemical routes: often the selectivity of the reaction can be better controlled through the use of potential control at the electrode, and the creation of environmen- tally harmful waste material can be avoided more easily since one is using the purest reagent - the electron. In addition to development of new synthetic routes, many old ones, which were found to be un- economical in the past, are worth reexamining in light of the recent considerable advances in cell design principles, materials of construc- tion, and electrode and separator materials, together with our im- proved understanding of electrode reactions and electrocatalysis. It is in the hope of accelerating this process that this bibliography is published.

  • Mechanisms of Inorganic and Organometallic Reactions

    This series provides a continuing critical review of the literature concerned with mechanistic aspects of inorganic and organometallic reactions in solu- tion, with coverage over the whole area being complete in each volume. The format of this second volume is very similar to that of the first, with material arranged according to reaction type and compound type along generally accepted lines. Papers discussed are selected on the basis of relevance to the elucidation of reaction mechanisms but may also include results of a nonkinetic nature, such as stereochemical studies and product ratios, when useful mechanistic information can be deduced. In this volume extra space has been given to areas concerned with electron transfer processes and substitution reactions of inert complexes, and to improve convenience for the reader the text has been further divided to form three additional chapters. Electron transfer processes are discussed in three chapters: "General and Theoretical," "Reactions between Two Complexes," and "Metal-Ligand Redox Reactions," while six chapters are concerned with substitution and related reactions. Here reactions of inert chromium and cobalt complexes are discussed in separate chapters. The period of literature coverage is January 1981 through June 1982 inclusive and in a few instances, where delays in delivery of journals have been encountered, the issues not covered will be included in the next volume.

  • Maternity : Mothers and Children in the Arts of Africa

    On the African continent, images of mothers and children are found wherever the visual arts are, from early rock-art sites in Egypt and the Sahara to the contemporary arts of South Africa. Found in a variety of materials, from stone, ivory, and metals to beadwork, wood, and even paintings, images of maternity enliven virtually every type of object made in the region. Defining maternity as a biological and cultural phenomenon, the author goes beyond obvious notions of fertility to consider the importance of maternity in thought, ritual action, and worldview. Maternity images of all eras evoke deep and significant messages - well beyond what meets the eye.

  • Quality Management in Hospitality: Best Practice in Action

    This study consists of a series of case histories researched at senior levels of organizations. These case histories map the progress which the hospitality industry is making in the field of quality management. The book aims to combine a sound theoretical foundation with examples in current industry practice. Illustrating good practice in quality management in hospitality and tourism organizations, it is based on research sponsored by the National Economic Development Office. It includes a broad range of case studies, including examples from the leisure and tourism industries.

  • Mirroring China's Past: Emperors, Scholars, and Their Bronzes

    A lavishly illustrated book that offers an in-depth look at the cultural practices surrounding the tradition of collecting ancient bronzes in China during the 18th and 19th centuries

    In ancient China (2000-221 b.c.) elaborate bronze vessels were used for rituals involving cooking, drinking, and serving food. This fascinating book not only examines the cultural practices surrounding these objects in their original context, but it also provides the first in-depth study tracing the tradition of collecting these bronzes in China. Essays by international experts delve into the concerns of the specialized culture that developed around the vessels and the significant influence this culture, with its emphasis on the concept of antiquity, had on broader Chinese society. While focusing especially on bronze collections of the 18th and 19th centuries, this wide-ranging catalogue also touches on the ways in which contemporary artists continue to respond to the complex legacy of these objects. Packed with stunning photographs of exquisitely crafted vessels, Mirroring China's Past is an enlightening investigation into how the role of ancient bronzes has evolved throughout Chinese history.

  • Thin Film Solar Cells

    "You, 0 Sun, are the eye of the world You are the soul of all embodied beings You are the source of all creatures You are the discipline of all engaged in work" - Translated from Mahabharata 3rd Century BC Today, energy is the lifeline and status symbol of "civilized" societies. All nations have therefore embarked upon Research and Development pro- grams of varying magnitudes to explore and effectively utilize renewable sources of energy. Albeit a low-grade energy with large temporal and spatial variations, solar energy is abundant, cheap, clean, and renewable, and thus presents a very attractive alternative source. The direct conver- sion of solar energy to electricity (photovoltaic effect) via devices called solar cells has already become an established frontier area of science and technology. Born out of necessity for remote area applications, the first commercially manufactured solar cells - single-crystal silicon and thin film CdS/Cu2S - were available well over 20 years ago. Indeed, all space vehicles today are powered by silicon solar cells. But large-scale terrestrial applications of solar cells still await major breakthroughs in terms of discovering new and radical concepts in solar cell device structures, utilizing relatively more abundant, cheap, and even exotic materials, and inventing simpler and less energy intensive fabrication processes. No doubt, this extraordinary challenge in R/D has led to a virtual explosion of activities in the field of photovoltaics in the last several years.

  • Approaches to Archaeological Ceramics

    More than any other category of evidence, ceramics ofters archaeologists their most abundant and potentially enlightening source of information on the past. Being made primarily of day, a relatively inexpensive material that is available in every region, ceramics became essential in virtually every society in the world during the past ten thousand years. The straightfor- ward technology of preparing, forming, and firing day into hard, durable shapes has meant that societies at various levels of complexity have come to rely on it for a wide variety of tasks. Ceramic vessels quickly became essential for many household and productive tasks. Food preparation, cooking, and storage-the very basis of settled village life-could not exist as we know them without the use of ceramic vessels. Often these vessels broke into pieces, but the virtually indestructible quality of the ceramic material itself meant that these pieces would be preserved for centuries, waiting to be recovered by modem archaeologists. The ability to create ceramic material with diverse physical properties, to form vessels into so many different shapes, and to decorate them in limitless manners, led to their use in far more than utilitarian contexts. Some vessels were especially made to be used in trade, manufacturing activities, or rituals, while ceramic material was also used to make other items such as figurines, models, and architectural ornaments.

  • Encountering the Spiritual in Contemporary Art

    An in-depth and current investigation of how the spiritual is manifestly present in contemporary art

    The spiritual is everywhere evident in contemporary art, and this publication fulfills a long-awaited need. Encountering the Spiritual in Contemporary Art addresses the subject in depth for the first time in over three decades. It significantly broadens the scope of previous studies to include new media and non-Western and Indigenous art (in addition to that of the West), presents art from diverse cultures with equal status, promotes cultural specificity, and moves beyond notions of "center and periphery," celebrating the plurality and global nature of contemporary art today. Major essays based on cultural affinities are interspersed with brief thematic essays to provide diverse perspectives and expand the knowledge of academic and general audiences.

    Encountering the Spiritual provides an alternative to the main currents of presentation and interpretation prevalent in contemporary art, appealing to believers, agnostics, and inveterate skeptics alike. This essential publication demonstrates that the need to address the fundamental questions of life are both innate and ongoing.

  • The War Walk: A Journey Along the Western Front

    A tourist guide, a history and a personal story of the Western Front 1914-18

    Nigel Jones's uncle was killed in action near Ypres in 1915, aged just eighteen, and his father served on Field Marshal Haig's staff: no wonder then, that he has always been fascinated by the First World War.

    THE WAR WALK describes his pilgrimage to the Western Front battlefields: it is a compelling blend of history, travel and personal anecdotes from some of the last surviving veterans of the First World War.
    He follows the old trench networks from the Belgian coast to the Swiss frontier, bringing each battlefield to life with vivid eyewitness testimony and investigating how the sites are preserved today for modern visitors.

  • Handbook of Geriatrics

    As our population continues to age, health professionals are being called on to care for an ever-increasing number of elderly patients. A thorough understanding of what constitutes normal aging versus age-prevalent illness is essential. In addition, the atypical and nonspecific presentation of illness commonly encountered when caring for an older patient must be expected and watched for carefully. In recent years, the health professional has been exposed to an exponentially increasing number of publications attempting to teach geriatric principles. To date, few publications lend themselves to use by the busy practitioner, student, or nurse in search of immediate facts, flow sheets, and clinically applicable data. It was felt that the health professional would benefit greatly from a book based on the concept of a ready-reference "hand- book," with chapters filled with tables, flow sheets, and listings similar in scope to those in a well-presented lecture series. Our goal was to create a geriatrics handbook that would have value at the bedside as well as in the classroom. It is to this end that the contributors dedicated their efforts.

  • George Washington: The Wonder of the Age

    "The only Washington biography you need."--Wall Street Journal

    As editor of the award-winning Library of America collection of George Washington's writings and a curator of the great man's original papers, John Rhodehamel has established himself as an authority of our nation's preeminent founding father. In this "crisply written, admirably concise, and never superficial" biography (Fergus M. Bordewich, Wall Street Journal) Rhodehamel examines George Washington as a public figure, arguing that the man--who first achieved fame in his early twenties--is inextricably bound to his mythic status. Solidly grounded in Washington's papers and exemplary in its brevity, this approachable biography is a superb introduction to the leader whose name has become synonymous with America.

  • Unorthodox

    This wide-ranging and thought-provoking compilation explores the idea of nonconformity in art, religion, and philosophy. The book features 55 contemporary artists who work outside the norms of current practice, alongside both newly commissioned and previously published texts which, taken together, provide an astute sampling of recent perspectives on art and ideas. Among the artists whose work is featured are Margit Anna, Clayton Bailey, Tony Cox, Abu Bakarr Mansaray, Birgit Megerle, Philip Smith, and Keiichi Tanaami. The accompanying texts include classic works by Sigmund Freud and Leo Steinberg, reprinted with new commentary by Mark Edmundson and Joshua Decter, respectively; a recent essay on unorthodoxy in Judaism by Alan T. Levenson with a response by Jack Wertheimer; and a previously unpublished meditation on Aby Warburg's art history by Georges Didi-Huberman.

  • Issues and Reviews in Teratology

    Why Efforts to Expand the Meaning of "Teratogen" Are Unacceptable Disagreement about nomenclature in teratology is not new. Dissent even about the very fabric of the discipline-what congenital malformations consist of-has often been voiced. Time, instead of resolving such diffi- culties, has sometimes worsened them. For example, in the past it was agreed that congenital malforma- tions are abnormalities of structure present at birth, but differences of opinion concerning where the line between normal and abnormal was to be drawn prevailed. It was obvious that, in order to discover the causes of congenital malformations and cast strategies for their prevention, it would be necessary to have knowledge of the baseline of their frequency, and that this required uniformity of definition of terms. Since malfor- mations of primary social concern are those having grave outcomes (and are, paradoxically, also the commonest ones), it is logical that such condi- tions were the first consideration of investigators and were the defects whose frequency was considered to comprise the required baseline.

  • The Forgotten Soldier

    An international bestseller, this is a German soldier's first-hand account of life on Russian front during the second half of the Second World War.

    When Guy Sajer joins the infantry full of ideals in the summer of 1942, the German army is enjoying unparalleled success in Russia. However, he quickly finds that for the foot soldier the glory of military success hides a much harsher reality of hunger, fatigue and constant deprivation. Posted to the crack Grosse Deutschland division, with its sadistic instructors who shoot down those who fail to make the grade, he enters a violent and remorseless world where all youthful hope is gradually ground down, and all that matters is the brute will to survive. As the biting cold of the Russian winter sets in, and the tide begins to turn against the Germans, life becomes an endless round of pounding artillery attacks and vicious combat against a relentless and merciless Red Army. A book of stunning force, this is an unforgettable reminder of the horrors of war.

  • Mathematical Theory of Electrophoresis

    The development of contemporary molecular biology with its growing tendency toward in-depth study of the mechanisms of biological processes, structure, function, and identification of biopolymers requires application of accurate physicochemical methods. Electrophoresis occupies a key position among such methods. A wide range of phenomena fall un- der the designation of electrophoresis in the literature at the present time. One common characteristic of all such phenomena is transport by an elec- tric field of a substance whose particles take on a net charge as a result of interaction with the solution. The most important mechanisms for charge generation are dissociation of the substance into ions in solution and for- mation of electrical double layers with uncompensated charges on particles of dispersed medium in the liquid. As applied to the problem of separation, purification, and analysis of cells, cell organelles, and biopolymers, there is a broad classification of electrophoretic methods primarily according to the methodological charac- teristics of the process, the types of supporting media, etc. An extensive literature describes the use of these methods for the investigation of differ- ent systems. A number of papers are theoretical in nature. Thus, the mi- croscopic theory has been developed rather completely [13] by considering electrophoresis within the framework of electrokinetic phenomena based on the concept of the electrical double layer.

  • John Baldessari Catalogue Raisonné: 1994-2004

    The fourth volume of the John Baldessari Catalogue Raisonne comprises approximately 370 works that represent the activity of this iconic conceptual artist between 1994 and 2004. Here, John Baldessari (b. 1931) continues to interrogate the possibilities of photographic appropriation, further developing his unique strategies for the production of meaning and narrative within the picture frame. Included in this crucial volume is the landmark Goya series, which shows the artist revisiting his characteristic photo-text pieces established early in his career. In the serial trio Overlap, Intersection, and Junction, produced between 2000 and 2002, Baldessari riffs on the notion of pictorial space, with each series building on the preceding one. Along with a full chronology, an essay contributed by the eminent critic Robert Storr closely examines a selection of these works, articulating their place within the evolution of the artist's career and their much broader historical climate.

  • The Condition of Being Here: Drawings by Jasper Johns

    Arguably the most important living artist in America, Jasper Johns (b. 1930) has been a leading advocate of drawing as an artistic genre in its own right, not just a preparatory medium for other works. This catalogue brings together 41 of Johns's drawings, spanning more than 60 years of his illustrious career and, beginning in 1954, the origin of his mature practice. It encompasses his most famous recurring motifs, including flags, targets, and numbers, and an essay by David Breslin contextualizes this reiterative aspect of Johns's career. Exquisite reproductions and large-scale details reveal the touch and process of this master draftsman, imparting to the reader a feeling of being in close contact with the artist himself. As this intimate book shows, Johns's art, at once simple and enigmatic, is above all a meditation on the world around him, a constant investigation of what he calls "the condition of being here."

  • Polymeric Liquid Crystals

    This book originated in the Proceedings of the Second Symposium on Polymeric Liquid Crystals held by the Division of Polymer Chemistry in the framework of the 1983 Fall Meeting of the American Chemical Society. At the First Symposium in 1977, the literature in this field could be encompassed in a single volume. To- day, that is no longer possible. The field of Polymeric Liquid Crystals grew, and continues to grow, at a very rapid pace. At present, we know of every major mesophase in its polymeric form and of polymeric glasses, elastomers and fluids in their liquid crystalline form. Every year, new polymeric mesophases are being discovered. The aim of this book is to go beyond a compilation of papers presented at the 1983 ACS Fall Meeting. It is conceived as a learning tool for the benefit of the sci- entist interested in Polymeric Liquid Crystals. The book is divided into three sections. The first section contains articles discussing synthetic, physico- chemical, structural and rheological aspects of Polymeric Liquid Crystals in their generality. A chapter on methods currently used in this field is also included. There are also chapters on theoretical and classification aspects of PLCs. These self-contained tutorial chapters provide an introduction to this field as well as to the specific papers given in the book. They provide an exhaustive cover- age of literature on the subject from its inception to the present.

  • Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum: A Guide

    The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and its magnificent collection are enlivened through fresh insights and new photography in this updated guide

    This updated guide to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum charts new pathways through the beloved institution's superb collection. Gardner, a trail-blazing American who was among the most prominent patrons of her day, built a Venetian-inspired palazzo in Boston to share her exquisite and thought-provoking art objects from diverse cultures and eras. She hosted luminaries in the worlds of music, dance, and literature, and supported such famed artists as Henry James and John Singer Sargent. The authors look at masterpieces by Botticelli, Rembrandt, Titian, and others, as well as hidden treasures, including decorative arts, correspondence, and photographs. Rather than positioning the museum simply as a historical gem, they present it as a site for forging connections between past and present and reinforcing the founder's legacy of sustaining contemporary art, music, and education. Featuring all-new photography, the book captures the uniqueness of this museum, helping us consider anew what the museum meant in Gardner's time and what it means in ours.

  • As in Nature: Helen Frankenthaler Paintings

    Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) was a pioneer of Abstract Expressionism and of the later Color Field movement. She found inspiration in nature, including the idyllic, wooded landscapes of the northeastern United States. This beautiful publication celebrates Frankenthaler and the extraordinary holdings of her work in the collection of the late William Louis-Dreyfus. An avid admirer of Frankenthaler, Louis-Dreyfus collected more than twenty of her paintings, most from the under-studied later decades of her career when she explored techniques of layering color. With beautiful illustrations of works from Louis-Dreyfus's collection, as well as several from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, this publication makes a significant contribution to the study of works from this later period in Frankenthaler's illustrious career.

  • The Club: Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age

    Named one of the 10 Best Books of 2019 by the New York Times Book Review

    "Damrosch brings the Club's redoubtable personalities -- the brilliant minds, the jousting wits, the tender camaraderie -- to vivid life..."--The New York Times Book Review

    In 1763, the painter Joshua Reynolds proposed to his friend Samuel Johnson that they invite a few friends to join them every Friday at the Turk's Head Tavern in London to dine, drink, and talk until midnight. Eventually the group came to include among its members Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, Edward Gibbon, and James Boswell. It was known simply as "the Club."

    In this captivating book, Leo Damrosch brings alive a brilliant, competitive, and eccentric cast of characters. With the friendship of the "odd couple" Samuel Johnson and James Boswell at the heart of his narrative, Damrosch conjures up the precarious, exciting, and often brutal world of late eighteenth-century Britain. This is the story of an extraordinary group of people whose ideas helped to shape their age, and our own.

  • 100 Winning Bridge Tips

    This latest edition of an outstanding book contains some new tips which reflect the changes in the game since the original publication in 1987. Learning from bitter experience at the bridge table is a slow, painful and often costly business. The 100 winning tips are designed to cover specific situations in bidding, play and defence - the sort of problems that arise over and over again in everyday play, providing a painless substitute for experience.

  • Work / Travail / Arbeid

    This publication accompanies a newly commissioned project by the legendary Belgian choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker (b. 1960), which reimagines her stage piece Vortex Temporum for the exhibition space as a nine-week-long endeavor in technical acuity and physical prowess as much as conceptual audacity. Calling attention to and simultaneously dismantling the fundamental conditions of dance, Work / Travail / Arbeid transforms De Keersmaeker's choreography into a radically extended exhibition form, continually on display, while maintaining the meticulousness and vital relationship to music that she has long exemplified. Featuring newly commissioned essays, this multi-volume boxed catalogue mirrors the temporal structure of the exhibition, documenting the full duration of De Keersmaeker's ambitious project and parsing out its unique construction.

  • Hope Without Optimism

    In a virtuoso display of erudition, thoughtfulness and humour, Terry Eagleton teases apart the concept of hope as it has been (often mistakenly) conceptualised over six millennia, from ancient Greece to today. He distinguishes hope from simple optimism, cheeriness, desire, idealism or adherence to the doctrine of Progress, bringing into focus a standpoint that requires reflection and commitment, arises from clear-sighted rationality, can be cultivated by practice and self-discipline, and which acknowledges but refuses to capitulate to the realities of failure and defeat. Authentic hope is indubitably tragic, yet Eagleton also argues for its radical implications as 'a species of permanent revolution, whose enemy is as much political complacency as metaphysical despair'. It is a means of facing the future without devaluing the moment or obviating the past. Traversing centuries of thought about the many modes of hoping - from Ernst Bloch's monumental work through the Stoics, Aquinas, Marx and Kierkegaard, among others - this penetrating book throws new light on religious faith and political ideology as well as issues such as the problem of evil, the role of language and the meaning of the past. Hope Without Optimism is a brilliantly engaged, impassioned chronicle of human belief and desire in an increasingly uncertain world.

  • Laser Applications in Medicine and Biology

    The diversity of the chapters presented in this volume illustrates not only the many applications of lasers, but also the fact that, in many cases, these are not new uses of lasers, but rather improvements of laser techniques already widely accepted in both research and clinical situations. Biological reactions to some special aspects of laser exposure continue to show new effects, which have implications for the ever-present topic of laser safety. Such biological reactions are included in fields of research which depend on properties of electromagnetic radiation exposure only possible with lasers, for example, the short pulses necessary for the temperature-jump experiments reviewed by Reiss: Speciality lasers, such as the transverse excitation atmospheric (TEA) or excimer lasers, add new wavelengths and pulse domains to those already available for biological application. A description of these new types of lasers by Osgood is included to indicate new possibilities for future use and to avoid limiting our coverage to well-developed present-day applications. Hillenkamp and Kaufmann describe a microprobe mass spectrograph for analysis of the minute amounts of material evaporated by a laser pulse. The analytical possibilities of this instrument are far-reaching, and some of the various results are described to illustrate the power of their method, as well as to show the types of problems that are suitable for it. The initial steps in photosynthesis have become the subject of intensive investigation.

  • Urban Rage : The Revolt of the Excluded

    A timely and incisive examination of contemporary urban unrest that explains why riots will continue until citizens are equally treated and politically included.
    In the past few decades, urban riots have erupted in democracies across the world. While high profile politicians often react by condemning protestors' actions and passing crackdown measures, urban studies professor Mustafa Dikec shows how these revolts are in fact rooted in exclusions and genuine grievances which our democracies are failing to address. In this eye-opening study, he argues that global revolts may be sparked by a particular police or government action but nonetheless are expressions of much longer and deep seated rage accumulated through hardship and injustices that have become routine. Increasingly recognized as an expert on urban unrest, Dikec examines urban revolts in the United States, United Kingdom, France, Sweden, Greece, and Turkey and, in a sweeping and engaging account, makes it clear that change is only possible if we address the failures of democratic systems and rethink the established practices of policing and political decision-making.

  • Magnetospheric Physics: Achievements and Prospects

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1989 Crafoord Symposium organized by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. The scientific field for the Crafoord Prize of 1989 was decided in 1988 by the Academy to be Magnetospheric Physics. On September 27,1989 the Academy awarded the 1989 Crafoord Prize to Professor J. A. Van Allen, Iowa City, USA "for his pioneer work in space research, in particular for the discovery of the high energy charged particles that are trapped in the Earth's magnetic field and form the radiation belts -often called the Van Allen belts - around the Earth." The subject for the Crafoord Symposium, which was held on September 28-29 at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, was Magnetospheric Physics, Achievements and Prospects. Some seventy of the world's leading scientists in magnetospheric physics (see list of participants) were invited to the Symposium. The program contained only invited papers. After the ?resentation of the Crafoord Prize Laureate, Prof. J . A. Van Allen, and his specially invited lecture: "Active Experiments in Magnetospheric Physics" follows in these proceedings two papers on the achievements of magnetospheric research hitherto. The main part of the proceedings (8 papers) deal with the main theme of the Symposium: How we shall carry on magnetospheric research in the future. The Symposium was organized by five members of the Academy representing the field of space physics: Lars Block (Stockholm), Rolf Bostrom (Uppsala), Kerstin Fredga (Stockholm), Carl-Gunne Fiilthammar (Stockholm) and Bengt Hultqvist (Kiruna, Chairman).

  • Technologies of the Image: Art in 19th-Century Iran

    The diverse and beautiful art of Qajar Iran (1779-1925) has long been understudied and underappreciated. This insightful publication reassesses Qajar art, particularly its four principal mediums--lacquer, painting and drawing on paper, lithography, and photography--and their intertwined development. The Qajar era saw the rise of new technologies and the incorporation of mass-produced items imported from Europe, Russia, and India. These cultural changes sparked a shift in the Iranian art world, as artists produced printed and photographic images and also used these widely disseminated mediums as sources for their paintings on paper and in lacquer. Technologies of the Image illustrates dozens of Qajar works, including sketches and designs from Harvard's extraordinary album of artists' drawings, photographs by Ali Khan Vali, and stunning Persian lacquer from private collections. The book considers Qajar art as the product of a rapidly changing art world in which images moved across and between media, highlighting objects that span contexts of production and patronage, from royal to sub-royal.

  • The Neocortex: Ontogeny and Phylogeny

    Of the three organizers of this NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Neocortex: Onto- geny and Phylogeny," one derived most of his knowledge about neocortex from studies on birds, another had never studied any animal but the cat and could probably recognize not more than ten animal species, and the third had very limited experience with mountaineering. They had in common the belief that evolutionary thinking permeates what biologists do, but that evolution of species and structures cannot be directly experimentally addressed. Although the fossil record can provide some major insights, the inroad to the evolution of the brain is indirect, via comparative anatomy and developmental biology. By identifying similarities and differences between brain structures in the species at hand, comparative anatomy generates hypotheses of evolutionary transformations. By understanding the rules of morphological transformation, developmental biology can, in principle, estimate the likelihood that a given transformation may have actually occurred. The meeting was a way to check if this notion is viable, by gathering together scientists from these two fields. Standing, left to right: F. Ebner, V. Caviness, M. Weisskopf, B. Fritszch, N. Swindale, J. Walter, H. Karten, J. Pettigrew, E. Welker, M. Cynader, D. Frost, L. Lopez-Mascaraque, P. Katz, H. Jerison, E. Soriano, Mayor of Alagna, Dr. G. Guglielmina, and associate, H. Van der Loos, B. Finlay, H. Scheich, C. Ruela. Seated: S. Pallas, T. Lohmann, J. De Carlos, F. Valverde, G. Innocenti, M. Diamond v "Gathering" does not accurately describe what really happened.

  • The Warm South: How the Mediterranean Shaped the British Imagination

    An evocative exploration of the impact of the Mediterranean on British culture, ranging from the mid-eighteenth century to today Ever since the age of the Grand Tour in the eighteenth century, the Mediterranean has had a significant pull for Britons--including many painters and poets--who sought from it the inspiration, beauty, and fulfillment that evaded them at home. Referred to as "Magick Land" by one traveler, dreams about the Mediterranean, and responses to it, went on to shape the culture of a nation. Written by one of the world's leading historians of the Mediterranean, this book charts how a new sensibility arose from British engagement with the Mediterranean, ancient and modern. Ranging from Byron's poetry to Damien Hirst's installations, Robert Holland shows that while idealized visions and aspirations often met with disillusionment and frustration, the Mediterranean also offered a notably insular society the chance to enrich itself through an imagined world of color, carnival, and sensual self-discovery.

  • Introduction to Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    TO THE SECOND EDITION In the nine years since this book was first written, rapid progress has been made scientifically in nuclear fusion, space physics, and nonlinear plasma theory. At the same time, the energy shortage on the one hand and the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn on the other have increased the national awareness of the important applications of plasma physics to energy production and to the understanding of our space environment. In magnetic confinement fusion, this period has seen the attainment 13 of a Lawson number nTE of 2 x 10 cm -3 sec in the Alcator tokamaks at MIT; neutral-beam heating of the PL T tokamak at Princeton to KTi = 6. 5 keV; increase of average ss to 3%-5% in tokamaks at Oak Ridge and General Atomic; and the stabilization of mirror-confined plasmas at Livermore, together with injection of ion current to near field-reversal conditions in the 2XIIss device. Invention of the tandem mirror has given magnetic confinement a new and exciting dimension. New ideas have emerged, such as the compact torus, surface-field devices, and the EssT mirror-torus hybrid, and some old ideas, such as the stellarator and the reversed-field pinch, have been revived. Radiofrequency heat ing has become a new star with its promise of dc current drive. Perhaps most importantly, great progress has been made in the understanding of the MHD behavior of toroidal plasmas: tearing modes, magnetic Vll Vlll islands, and disruptions."

  • Frederic Church: A Painter's Pilgrimage

    A beautiful overview of fascinating paintings of the classical world and the Holy Land by a beloved American artist

    Frederic Church (1826-1900), one of the leading painters of 19th-century America and the Hudson River School, also journeyed around the globe to find fresh inspiration for his highly detailed compositions. Among Church's lesser-known masterpieces are his paintings of the Middle East, Italy, and Greece, produced in the late 1860s through late 1870s, which explore themes of human history and achievement.

    Taking a closer look at this geographical and thematic shift in Church's practice, this handsome book brings together the artist's major paintings of Athens, Rome, Jerusalem, and the surrounding region. The essays concentrate on a set of six major paintings of architectural and archaeological marvels; one essay also spotlights Olana, Church's home in New York State, which reflects the influence of Middle Eastern design. This impressive volume stands apart in its new approach to the artist's work and its quest to determine why and how this quintessentially American figure was drawn to scenery and themes from the other side of the globe.

  • Activity Measurement in Psychology and Medicine

    In his treatment of activity measurement in the fields of medicine and psychology, Tryon gives us a book that clearly accomplishes the three purposes set out in its preface. The reader is definitely encouraged to wrestle with the concepts ofbehavior and activity in terms of "dynamic physical quantities." Moreover, the reader cannot help but become familiarized with the technology available for performing activity measurements. Motivation to use some of this technology is enhanced by the very extensive summary of other people's uses of it provided throughout the book. Readers may find the book provocative on a number of Ievels. It is concep- tually provocative to those of us struggling with understanding basic issues in the assessment and measurement of behavior. It is practically provocative to those of us working with various forms of behavioral difference, especially in clinical popula- tions. The book provokes because it is essentially an unfinished exploration, open- ing us to numerous pathways that, when traveled, reveal still more paths to explore. In this sense the book should be heuristically useful both in the more traditional empirical sense, and in terms of its Stimulation of conceptual discussion.

  • Miniature Interiors: Inspirational Source Book of Interior Design for Dolls' Houses

    A demonstration of a range of stylistic approaches to miniature interior decorating, from the historically accurate to the highly imaginative. The author demonstrates how to co-ordinate various style elements, and provides tips on adapting and re-upholstering furniture for a particular effect.

  • Crusade and Jihad: The Thousand-Year War Between the Muslim World and the Global North

    What really happened in the centuries of conflict between Europe, Russia, China, America, and the peoples of the Muslim world

    Crusade and Jihad is the first book to encompass, in one volume, the entire history of the catastrophic encounter between the Global North--China, Russia, Europe, Britain, and America--and Muslim societies from Central Asia to West Africa. William R. Polk draws on more than half a century of experience as a historian, policy planner, diplomat, peace negotiator, and businessman to explain the deep hostilities between the Muslim world and the Global North and show how they grew over the centuries.

    Polk shows how Islam arose and spread across North Africa into Europe, climaxed in the vibrant and sophisticated caliphate of al-Andalus in medieval Spain, and was the bright light in a European Dark Age. Simultaneously, Islam spread from the Middle East into Africa, India, and Southeast Asia. But following the Mongol invasions, Islamic civilization entered a decline while Europe began its overseas expansion. Portuguese buccaneers dominated the Indian Ocean; the Dutch and the English established powerful corporations that turned India and Indonesia into colonies; Russian armies pushed down the Volga into Central Asia, destroying its city-states; and the Chinese Qing dynasty slaughtered an entire Central Asian people. Britain crushed local industry and drained off wealth throughout its vast colonies. Defeated at every turn, Muslims tried adopting Western dress, organizing Westernstyle armies, and embracing Western ideas.

    None of these efforts stopped the conquests. For Europe and Russia, the nineteenth century was an age of colonial expansion, but for the Muslim world it was an age of brutal and humiliating defeat. Millions were driven from their homes, starved, or killed, and their culture and religion came under a century-long assault.

    In the twentieth century, brutalized and and disorganized native societies, even after winning independence, fell victim to "post-imperial malaise," typified by native tyrannies, corruption, and massive poverty. The result was a furious blowback.

    A sobering, scrupulous, and frank account of imperialism, colonialism, insurgency, and terrorism, Crusade and Jihad is history for anyone who wishes to understand the civilizational conflicts of today's world.

  • One Hot Summer: Dickens, Darwin, Disraeli, and the Great Stink of 1858

    A unique, colorful view of Victorian London when residents both famous and now-forgotten endured "the Great Stink" across one hot summer​

    While 1858 in London may have been noteworthy for its broiling summer months and the related stench of the sewage-filled Thames River, the year is otherwise little remembered. And yet, historian Rosemary Ashton reveals in this compelling microhistory, 1858 was marked by significant, if unrecognized, turning points. For ordinary people, and also for the rich, famous, and powerful, the months from May to August turned out to be a summer of consequence.

    Ashton mines Victorian letters and gossip, diaries, court records, newspapers, and other contemporary sources to uncover historically crucial moments in the lives of three protagonists--Charles Dickens, Charles Darwin, and Benjamin Disraeli. She also introduces others who gained renown in the headlines of the day, among them George Eliot, Karl Marx, William Thackeray, and Edward Bulwer Lytton. Ashton reveals invisible threads of connection among Londoners at every social level in 1858, bringing the celebrated city and its citizens vibrantly to life.

  • In Search of the Sacred

    This text traces the growth and development of two related disciplines, anthropology and the study of religions. Locating these disciplines within the intellectual climate of the 19th century, the study considers the contributions of scholars such as Jame

  • The Soul of the First Amendment

    A lively and controversial overview by the nation's most celebrated First Amendment lawyer of the unique protections for freedom of speech in America

  • Measures of Complexity and Chaos

    This volume serves as a general introduction to the state of the art of quantitatively characterizing chaotic and turbulent behavior. It is the outgrowth of an international workshop on "Quantitative Measures of Dynamical Complexity and Chaos" held at Bryn Mawr College, June 22-24, 1989. The workshop was co-sponsored by the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, PA and by the NATO Scientific Affairs Programme through its special program on Chaos and Complexity. Meetings on this subject have occurred regularly since the NATO workshop held in June 1983 at Haverford College only two kilometers distant from the site of this latest in the series. At that first meeting, organized by J. Gollub and H. Swinney, quantitative tests for nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior were debated and promoted [1). In the six years since, the methods for dimension, entropy and Lyapunov exponent calculations have been applied in many disciplines and the procedures have been refined. Since then it has been necessary to demonstrate quantitatively that a signal is chaotic rather than it being acceptable to observe that "it looks chaotic." Other related meetings have included the Pecos River Ranch meeting in September 1985 of G. Mayer- Kress [2) and the reflective and forward looking gathering near Jerusalem organized by M. Shapiro and I. Procaccia in December 1986 [3). This meeting was proof that interest in measuring chaotic and turbulent signals is widespread.

  • Brazil, 1964-1985: The Military Regimes of Latin America in the Cold War

    An insightful study of the political, economic, and social changes Brazil experienced during the twenty-year rule of its Cold War military regime.

    Cuba's revolution in 1959 fueled powerful anti-Communist fears in the United States. As a result, in the years that followed, governments throughout Central and South America were toppled in U.S.-backed military coups, and by 1977 only three democratically elected leaders remained in all of Latin America. This perceptive study, coauthored by a revered historian and a prominent economist, examines how the military rulers of Brazil profoundly altered the nation's economy, politics, and society during their two decades in power, and it explores the lasting impact of these changes after democracy was restored. Comparing and contrasting the history, programs, methods, and goals of Brazil's Cold War-era authoritarian government with the military regimes of Peru, Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, and Uruguay, authors Herbert Klein and Francisco Vidal Luna offer a fascinating, detailed analysis of the Brazilian experience from 1964 to 1985, one of the darkest, most difficult periods in Latin American history.

  • Making Magnificence: Architects, Stuccatori, and the Eighteenth-Century Interior

    This book tells the remarkable story of the craftsmen of Ticino, in Italian-speaking Switzerland, who took their prodigious skills as specialist decorative plasterworkers throughout Northern Europe in the 18th century, adorning classical architecture with their rich and fluent decor. Their names are not widely known - Giuseppi Artari (c.1690-1771), Giovanni Battista Bagutti (1681-1755), and Francesco Vassalli (1701-1771) are a few - but their work transformed the interiors of magnificent buildings in Italy, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Britain, and Ireland. Among the interiors highlighted in this deeply researched, beautifully illustrated volume are Palazzo Reale in Turin, Upper Belvedere in Vienna, St. Martin in the Fields in London, the Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, Houghton Hall in Norfolk, and Carton House in Ireland.

  • Many-Particle Physics

    This textbook is for a course in advanced solid-state theory. It is aimed at graduate students in their third or fourth year of study who wish to learn the advanced techniques of solid-state theoretical physics. The method of Green's functions is introduced at the beginning and used throughout. Indeed, it could be considered a book on practical applications of Green's functions, although I prefer to call it a book on physics. The method of Green's functions has been used by many theorists to derive equations which, when solved, provide an accurate numerical description of many processes in solids and quantum fluids. In this book I attempt to summarize many of these theories in order to show how Green's functions are used to solve real problems. My goal, in writing each section, is to describe calculations which can be compared with experiments and to provide these comparisons whenever available. The student is expected to have a background in quantum mechanics at the level acquired from a graduate course using the textbook by either L. I. Schiff, A. S. Davydov, or I. Landau and E. M. Lifshiftz. Similarly, a prior course in solid-state physics is expected, since the reader is assumed to know concepts such as Brillouin zones and energy band theory. Each chapter has problems which are an important part of the lesson; the problems often provide physical insights which are not in the text. Sometimes the answers to the problems are provided, but usually not.

  • Making of the 1944 Education Act

    The 1944 Education Act was a crucial piece of British legislation - one of the most important this century. It was passed against a background of war and growing popular demand for social reform. It provided a framework for the education service which rem

  • Light, Lasers, and Synchrotron Radiation: A Health Risk Assessment

    This volume contains the formal record of the lectures presented at the 9th Course of the International School of Radiation Damage and Protection held at the "E . Majorana" International Centre for Scientific Culture in Erice (Italy) from May 9 to May 20, 1989. This course was the last of a series of 4 courses, started in 1981, that were dedicated to the assessment of risk hazard from non-ionizing radiation. The proceedings of these courses were all published by Plenum Press with the following headings: 1) M. Grandolfo, S. M. Michaelson and A. Rindi, Eds.: "Biological Effects and Dosimetry of Nonionizing Radiation; Radiofrequency and Microwave Energy", Plenum Press, New York, NATO ASI Series A Life Sciences, Vo1. 49 (1983); 2) M. Grandolfo, S. M. Michaelson and A. Rindi, Eds.: "Biological Effects and Dosimetry of Static and ELF Electromagnetic Fields", Plenum Press, New York, E. Majorana International Science Series, Life Sciences, Vol. 19 (1985); 3) M. H. Repacholi, M. Grandolfo and A. Rindi, Eds.: "Ultrasound; medical applications, biological effects and hazard potential", Plenum Press, New York (1987). We hope that all these volumes together may represent a complete textbook and a reference for the students and scientists interested in the physics, biology, measurement and dosimetry, health effects and standard setting, in short, the risk assessment of that wide field of radiation presently classified as non-ionizing radiation. We are indebted to the Associa?ione Italiana Protezione dalle Radiazioni (AIRP), The Internat: l.

  • Directory of British Scientific Instrument Makers 1550-1851

    This publication lists over 5,000 scientific instrument makers and retailers working in the British Isles, together with a further 10,000 names of apprentices and associates. The directory transforms our understanding of the history of the scientific instrument-making trades in Britain.

    Each entry includes estimated working dates, specific trades, addresses, training, apprentices, types of instruments made and brief biographical details. As such this volume not only provides essential information for collectors, dealers, museum curators and scholars, but it will also have much to offer economic, social and family historians, with its evidence about master-apprentice links, trade connections and family relationships.

  • The Living Room: Timeless Traditional Woodworking Projects

    All the furniture in this book has been carefully selected to be pleasing to the eye, simple to make and varied in design. The projects include an oak joint stool and bureau and each project comes complete with a scale plan and full instructions.

  • Applying Numbers and It in Health and Social Care

    This is a low level, introductory text which guides readers through the core skills in maths and IT which is needed to demonstrate as part of the GNVQ in Health and Social Care. The book contains practical examples, like designing a menu for a nursing home, and using spreadsheets to deal with the reception details in a hospital

  • Sustaining Lake Superior: An Extraordinary Lake in a Changing World

    A compelling exploration of Lake Superior's conservation recovery and what it can teach us in the face of climate change

    Lake Superior, the largest lake in the world, has had a remarkable history, including resource extraction and industrial exploitation that caused nearly irreversible degradation. But in the past fifty years it has experienced a remarkable recovery and rebirth. In this important book, leading environmental historian Nancy Langston offers a rich portrait of the lake's environmental and social history, asking what lessons we should take from the conservation recovery as this extraordinary lake faces new environmental threats.

    In her insightful exploration, Langston reveals hope in ecosystem resilience and the power of community advocacy, noting ways Lake Superior has rebounded from the effects of deforestation and toxic waste wrought by mining and paper manufacturing. Yet, despite the lake's resilience, threats persist. Langston cautions readers regarding new mining interests and persistent toxic pollutants that are mobilizing with climate change.

  • The Little Field Marshal: A Life of Sir John French

    The definitive biography of Sir John French, by the increasingly famous Richard Holmes.

    Sir John French is a figure who has always aroused controversy. Douglas Haig despised him, while Churchill thought his leadership qualities unsurpassed. Despite being the most capable cavalry leader of his generation, posterity has judged him an unfeeling butcher, responsible for more deaths in the first two hours of the battle of Loos than all the casualties on both sides in the 1944 D-Day landings.

    But there was another side to French, which is only revealed in his private papers. If his public life was controversial, his private life was positively scandalous: he courted dismissal after an affair with a fellow officer's wife, and had a string of beautiful and well-connected mistresses. And far from being the unfeeling butcher of popular myth, he was personally tormented by what he termed 'glory and her twin sister murder'. The lengthening casualty lists on the Western Front filled him with despair, as he envisaged his room at GHQ filled with the 'silent army' of the dead.

  • Advances in Nutritional Research

    Volume 8 of Advances in Nutritional Research deals with several topics of prime current interest in nutritional research, including the role of nutrition in hypertension, in the infections associated with protein-energy malnu- trition, and in pathological conditions associated with the generation of oxygen radicals in the tissues, as well as with topics of ongoing interest. Recent research indicates that reduction of obesity, of alcohol intake, and of sodium intake by salt-sensitive individuals, are the most effective non- pharmacological means of reducing high blood pressure. A new approach to therapy for infections caused by protein-energy malnutrition, based on restoration of immunocompetence by administration of thyroid and anti- glucocorticoid hormones, is presented. Current research into the role of nutrition in modulating tissue damage caused by oxygen radicals generated in various pathologies is reviewed. Two- chapters deal with perinatal nutrition, one with the transfer of nutrients across the placenta and the other with the energy requirements of term and preterm infants. Another dicusses methods of assessing the nutritional status of hospitalized patients. vii Contents Chapter 1. The Transfer of Nutrients across the Perfused Human Placenta ................................... . Joseph Dands 1. Introduction................................. 1 2. Comments on Comparative Placentology . . . . . . . . . . .- . . 1 . 3. The Perfusion Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 3 . . . . 4. Review of Transfer Experiments .................... 3 4.1. Transfer of Glutamic Acid .................... 3 4.2. Transfer of Riboflavin .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . 6 . . . 5. Potentials and Umltations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 9 . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 10 . . . . . .

  • Cochrane

    Bestselling account of the life of a real Horatio Hornblower

    The life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, later 10th Earl of Dundonald, was more extraordinary than that of Nelson, more far fetched than that of Hornblower or Patrick O'Brien's Jack Aubrey. Born the son of an eccentric and indigent Scottish peer, he entered the Royal Navy in 1793. In a series of outstanding and heroic actions, often against seemingly overwhelming odds, he made his name fighting Napoleon's navy as one of the most dashing and daring frigate captains of his day, before embarking on a career as a mercenary admiral.

  • The Curious World of Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn


    An intimate portrait of two pivotal Restoration figures during one of the most dramatic periods of English history Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn are two of the most celebrated English diarists. They were also extraordinary men and close friends. This first full portrait of that friendship transforms our understanding of their times.

    Pepys was earthy and shrewd, while Evelyn was a genteel aesthete, but both were drawn to intellectual pursuits. Brought together by their work to alleviate the plight of sailors caught up in the Dutch wars, they shared an inexhaustible curiosity for life and for the exotic. Willes explores their mutual interests-diary-keeping, science, travel, and a love of books-and their divergent enthusiasms, Pepys for theater and music, Evelyn for horticulture and garden design.

    Through the richly documented lives of two remarkable men, Willes revisits the history of London and of England in an age of regicide, revolution, fire, and plague to reveal it also as a time of enthralling possibility.

  • The Art of Iron: Objects from the Musée Le Secq Des Tournelles, Rouen, Normandy

    For centuries, wrought iron was worked with care and craft into objects as diverse as shop signs, balcony railings, and dog collars. This handsome volume brings together thirty-six unique pieces of wrought iron from the celebrated collection of the Musee Le Secq des Tournelles in Rouen, France, and combines stunning photography with fresh and engaging scholarship. Salvaged by the founders of the Musee Le Secq during a period when wrought iron was being rapidly discarded and replaced with modern materials, these objects tell stories of preindustrial times and highlight the importance of iron in our shared past. An essay by Kathleen M. Morris offers a contemporary perspective on these extraordinary works of art, while current and former curators of the Musee Le Secq provide fascinating insights into the magnificent holdings of the museum's renowned collection.

  • Practical Stereology

    vi on geometric probability is included, students can be expected to create a few simple programs like those shown, but for other geometries. I am indebted to Tom Hare for critical reviews of the material and an endless enthusiasm to debate and derive stereological relationships; to John Matzka at Plenum Press for patiently instructing me in the intricacies of typesetting; to Chris Russ for helping to program many of these measurement techniques; and especially to Helen Adams, both for her patience with my creative fever to write yet another book, and for pointing out that the title, which I had intended to contrast to "theoretical stereology," can also be understood as the antonym of "impractical stereology." John C. Russ Raleigh, NC July, 1986 Chapter 1: Statistics 1 Accuracy and precision 1 The mean and standard deviation 5 Distributions 7 Comparison 13 Correlation 18 Nonlinear fitting 19 Chapter 2: Image Types 23 Planar sections 23 Projected images 25 Finite sections 28 Space-filling structures and dispersed phases 29 Types of images and contrast mechanisms 31 Sampling 32 Chapter 3: Manual Methods 35 Volume fraction 35 Surface density 38 Contiguity 41 Mean intercept length 42 Line density 43 Grain size determination 55 Curvature 48 Reticles to aid counting 49 Magnification and units 51 Chapter4: Size Distributions 53 Intercept length in spheres 53 Nonspherical shapes 57 Corrections for finite section thickness 59 Lamellae 61 Measurement of profile size 62 Nonspherical particles 69 vii Contents viii Chapter 5: Computer Metlwds 7

  • Play All: A Bingewatcher's Notebook

    A world-renowned media and cultural critic offers an insightful analysis of serial TV drama and the modern art of the small screen

    Television and TV viewing are not what they once were--and that's a good thing, according to award-winning author and critic Clive James. Since serving as television columnist for the London Observer from 1972 to 1982, James has witnessed a radical change in content, format, and programming, and in the very manner in which TV is watched. Here he examines this unique cultural revolution, providing a brilliant, eminently entertaining analysis of many of the medium's most notable twenty-first-century accomplishments and their not always subtle impact on modern society--including such acclaimed serial dramas as Breaking Bad, The West Wing, Mad Men, and The Sopranos, as well as the comedy 30 Rock. With intelligence and wit, James explores a television landscape expanded by cable and broadband and profoundly altered by the advent of Netflix, Amazon, and other "cord-cutting" platforms that have helped to usher in a golden age of unabashed binge-watching.

  • Photodetectors

    x

  • Liberating Systems Theory

    Contemporary Systems Thinking is a series of texts, each of which deals comparatively and/or critically with different aspects of holistic thinking at the frontiers of the discipline. Traditionally, writings by systems thinkers have been concerned with single theme propositions such as General Systems Theory, Cybernetics, Operations Research, System Dynamics, Soft Systems Methodology and many others. Recently there have been attempts to fulfil a different yet equally important role by comparative analyses of viewpoints and approaches, each addressing disparate areas of study such as: modeling and simulation, measurement, management, 'problem solving' methods, international relations, social theory and last, but not exhaustively or least, philosophy. In a recent book these were drawn together within a multiform framework as part of an eclectic discussion -a nearly impossible task as I discovered (see Dealing With Complexity -An Introduction to the Theory and Application of Systems Science, R. L. Flood and E. R. Carson, Plenum, New York, 1988). Nevertheless, bringing many sources together led to several achievements, among which was showing a great diversity of approaches, ideas and application areas that systems thinking contributes to (although often with difficulties remaining unresolved). More important, however, while working on that manuscript I became aware of the need for and potential value in a series of books, each focusing in detail on the study areas mentioned above.

  • New Aspects of Nuclear Dynamics

    The 1988 Summer School on New Aspects of Nuclear Dynamics took place in the style that by now has become a tradition: a series of lectures by well known scientists on modem topics of nuclear physics, where special emphasis is placed on the didactic aspects of the lectures. In the past few years, we have witnessed a rapid evolution of the field of nuclear physics towards novel directions of research. This development is accompanied by the construction of some of the largest experimental facilities ever built for nuclear research. The subjects covered by the Summer School focussed on two main issues currently under active investigation and which will be pursued with the new facilities: the transition from nucleonic to quark degrees of freedom in the decription of nuclear reactions, and the behavior of nuclear matter as one approaches extreme densities and temperatures. These topics in many respects go beyond traditional nuclear physics and the speakers therefore also included high energy physicists. From the response of the participants it was clear that the program of the school filled a gap in the curriculum of many students. We wish to thank all the speakers for their well organized lectures, which were nicely geared to the level of the school, and for spending extra time on problem sessions and extensive discussions. The organization of this Summer School was made possible by substantial support from the Science Committee of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

  • Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States

    An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available that contradicts the standard narrative for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations

    Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today's states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family--all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction.

    Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the "barbarians" who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.

  • Cassell's Foreign Words and Phrases

    Over 5000 entries, from a priori to Zeitgeist Covers everyday expressions, specialist terms and tags Gives clear definitions and easy-to-use pronunciation guide Includes details of language and date of origin Highlights additional points of historical and etymological interest

  • The Kremlin Letters: Stalin's Wartime Correspondence With Churchill and Roosevelt


    A penetrating account of the dynamics of World War II's Grand Alliance through the messages exchanged by the 'Big Three'

    Stalin exchanged more than six hundred messages with Allied leaders Churchill and Roosevelt during the Second World War. In this riveting volume--the fruit of a unique British-Russian scholarly collaboration--the messages are published and also analyzed within their historical context. Ranging from intimate personal greetings to weighty salvos about diplomacy and strategy, this book offers fascinating new revelations of the political machinations and human stories behind the Allied triumvirate. Edited and narrated by two of the world's leading scholars on World War II diplomacy and based on a decade of research in British, American, and newly available Russian archives, this crucial addition to wartime scholarship illuminates an alliance that really worked while exposing its fractious limits and the issues and egos that set the stage for the Cold War that followed.

  • Devotion : Why I Write

    The National Book Award-winning author of Year of the Monkey, Just Kids, and M Train offers a rare, intimate account of her own creative process.

    A work of creative brilliance may seem like magic--its source a mystery, its impact unexpectedly stirring. How does an artist accomplish such an achievement, connecting deeply with an audience never met? In this groundbreaking book, one of our culture's beloved artists offers a detailed account of her own creative process, inspirations, and unexpected connections.

    Patti Smith first presents an original and beautifully crafted tale of obsession--a young skater who lives for her art, a possessive collector who ruthlessly seeks his prize, a relationship forged of need both craven and exalted. She then takes us on a second journey, exploring the sources of her story. We travel through the South of France to Camus's house, and visit the garden of the great publisher Gallimard where the ghosts of Mishima, Nabokov, and Genet mingle. Smith tracks down Simone Weil's grave in a lonely cemetery, hours from London, and winds through the nameless Paris streets of Patrick Modiano's novels. Whether writing in a cafe or a train, Smith generously opens her notebooks and lets us glimpse the alchemy of her art and craft in this arresting and original book on writing.

    The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham-Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University.

  • Cassell's Dictionary of Foreign Words and Phrases

    The English language is packed with imported words and phrases from languages ancient and modern and CASSELL'S FOREIGN WORDS AND PHRASES is an engrossing guide. This book goes far beyond the partial coverage of conventional dictionaries and includes a vast range of everyday vocabulary, specialist terms and famous tags and mottos. Each entry is defined and dated with details of derivation and pronunciation.

  • On the Verge of Insanity: Van Gogh and His Illness

    Accompanying the groundbreaking exhibition currently at the Van Gogh Museum, this publication features new information on Van Gogh's self-inflicted wound to his ear as well as identifying the revolver that was likely used in his suicide

    The mental state of Vincent van Gogh (1853--1890) has been a perennial source of discussion and conjecture since his death by suicide. Was he mentally ill or a genius? What was the precise nature of Van Gogh's illness? Did it influence his work? This intriguing publication examines how Van Gogh's mental condition revealed itself in 1888 and how he struggled with it throughout his life. Van Gogh's letters to his brother Theo, his artist friends, and his sister Willemien reveal that his primary reason for living was his art.

    Richly illustrated with artworks, letters, previously unpublished historical documents, and photographs, On the Verge of Insanity provides a nuanced and considered overview of an extraordinary man who had to cope with mental illness at a time when the symptoms were readily misunderstood and professional treatment was insufficient. The authors also offer a detailed account of the circumstances surrounding Van Gogh's death in Auvers-sur-Oise, and they review the many diagnoses that have been proposed since the artist's death.

  • Warhol & Mapplethorpe - Guise & Dolls

    A landmark examination of iconic and provocative portraits by Warhol and Mapplethorpe, presented side by side and in depth for the first time

    Andy Warhol (1928-1987) and Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989) are well known for significant work in portraiture and self-portraiture that challenged gender roles and notions of femininity, masculinity, and androgyny. This exciting and original book is the first to consider the two artists together, examining the powerful portraits they created during the vibrant and tumultuous era bookended by the Stonewall riots and the AIDS crisis. Several important bodies of work are featured, including Warhol's Ladies and Gentlemen series of drag queen portraits and his collaboration with Christopher Makos on Altered Image, in which Warhol was photographed in makeup and wigs, and Mapplethorpe's photographs of Patti Smith and of female body builder Lisa Lyon. These are explored alongside numerous other paintings, photographs, and films that demonstrate the artists' engagement with gender, identity, beauty, performance, and sexuality, including their own self-portraits and portraits of one another.

    Essays trace the convergences and divergences of Warhol and Mapplethorpe's work, and examine the historical context of the artists' projects as well as their lasting impact on contemporary art and queer culture. Firsthand accounts by the artists' collaborators and subjects reveal details into the making and exhibition of some of the works presented here. With an illustrated timeline highlighting key moments in the artists' careers, and more than 90 color plates of their arresting pictures, this book provides a fascinating study of two of the most compelling figures in 20th-century art.

  • Hydrometallurgical Process Fundamentals

    The mineral resources of the industrialized countries, especially the member nations of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- tion, are being depleted at such a rate that more and more of these count ries are beginning to depend on ore imported from other coun- tries. To sustain the economic and strategie well-being of these member countries, it becomes imperative that a program of developing and exploiting other non-conventional mineral resources and a con- servation program where metal values from waste dumps and scrap metals and alloys are recycled must be initiated and implemented. In order to meet this challenge, new processes and technology must be available for consideration in the design and operation of the new plants. One of the possible routes of extracting the metals from their ores, especially for multimetal complex ores and very low grade ores, is by hydrometallurgical processing. The hydrometallurgical route of metal recovery where dissolution (leaching), separation and concentration (ion exchange, solvent extraction, and membrane separation) and reduction to metal (cementation, precipitation by gaseous reduction, and electrolysis) is carried out at near ambient temperature is becoming more competi- tive with the conventional high temperature processes used in the smelting of metals from high grade and beneficiated ores.

  • Handbook of Hematologic and Oncologic Emergencies

    Oncology has developed as a subspecialty of medicine with unique and often complex clinical problems. This handbook ofhematologic and oncologic emer- gencies provides a compact, concise, yet comprehensive guide to the manage- ment of a variety of difficult clinical situations. The authors of the various chapters are all clinicians with experience in the management of these difficult patients. Their efforts provide insight and a ready source of practical infor- mation which lends itself to use in the clinic and in the inpatient ward. The authors sincerely hope that this handbook will be of service to house officers and fellows alike, as they develop skills in the management of the emergent problems of patients with hematologic and other neoplasms. Janice P. Dutcher Peter H. Wiernik Bronx, New York;; Contents 1. Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion and Hyponatremia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 000 . . . . . . . . . . . Stuart L. Marcus, M.D., Ph.D., and Joachim Z. Fuks, M.D. 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3. Etiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4. Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5. Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2. Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome: Prevention and Management . . 9 Stuart L. Marcus, M.D., Ph.D., and Avi I. Einz;ig, M.D. 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2. Risk Factors for the Development of Azotemia in Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome........................................... 10 3. Metabolic Abnormalities That Occur during Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Prevention of Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome: Management prior to Beginning Chemotherapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . 5. Posttreatment Management: Indications for Dialysis . . . . . . . . . . 14 . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • The Dictionary Of National Celebrity

    As Miles Kington recently complained in his Independent column, newspapers are increasingly full of unfamiliar names: 'Ant and Dec, Carol Smillie, Jordan, Simon Cowell, Nasty Nick, the Coughing Major, Davina McCall. 'Who are these horrible people?' asked Mr Kington. 'There should be a Dictionary of National Celebrity to keep us informed.' Indeed. For those who have no idea as to the true identity of, say, Maureen from Driving School, Charlotte the Harlot or Foxy Coxy, help is at hand! The Dictionary of National Celebrity consists of some 300 A to Z entries, running the gamut of today's celebrity culture from Jade Goody to Simon Cowell, from Lord Brocket to Emma Bunton, from Vanessa Feltz to Michael Flatley, from Christine Hamilton to Lady Victoria Hervey, from James Hewitt to Paris Hilton, and from Ricardo the Queer Barber to Richard and Judy. The volume will also include entries for a small number of seminal historical figures - Icarus, Boudicca, Lady Godiva - who may fairly be said to have blazed a trail for today's celebrities.In addition to these biographical articles, there will also be short articles on some key words and phrases in the celebrity lexicon, some key issues for the today's Celebrities ('celebrity handholding', 'cracking the American market'), and on some fascinating Celebrity phenomena (including 'Celebrity air rage'). Furthermore, special feature entries detailing Celebrity faux pas, will be accompanied by Celebrity 'top ten' charts displaying the ups and downs in popularity of various household names.

  • Hardwick Hall: A Great Old Castle of Romance

    Originally constructed in the late 16th century for the notorious Bess of Hardwick, Countess of Shrewsbury, Hardwick Hall is now among the National Trust's greatest architectural landmarks, with much of its original interior and ornamentation still intact. This splendid publication is the definitive source of scholarship on the remarkably well-preserved exemplar of late-Elizabethan style. Composed of extensive research and newly commissioned photography, this beautifully illustrated book traces the history of the house and its inhabitants through the centuries, showcasing a remarkable collection of portraiture, tapestries, furniture, and gardens, and providing readers with a genuine sense of the house's environment.

  • Seen from Behind: Perspectives on the Male Body and Renaissance Art

    Renaissance bodies, dressed and undressed, have not lacked attention in art historical literature, but scholarship on the male body has generally concentrated on phallic-oriented masculinity and been connected to issues of patriarchy and power. This original book examines the range of meaning that has been attached to the male backside in Renaissance art and culture, the transformation of the base connotation of the image to high art, and the question of homoerotic impulses or implications of admiring male figures from behind. Representations of the male body's behind have often been associated with things obscene, carnivalesque, comical, or villainous. Presenting serious scholarship with a deft hand, Seen from Behind expands our understanding of the motif of the male buttocks in Renaissance art, revealing both continuities and changes in the ways the images convey meaning and have been given meaning.

  • American Watercolor in the Age of Homer and Sargent

    The fascinating story of the transformation of American watercolor practice between 1866 and 1925

    The formation of the American Watercolor Society in 1866 by a small, dedicated group of painters transformed the perception of what had long been considered a marginal medium. Artists of all ages, styles, and backgrounds took up watercolor in the 1870s, inspiring younger generations of impressionists and modernists. By the 1920s many would claim it as "the American medium."

    This engaging and comprehensive book tells the definitive story of the metamorphosis of American watercolor practice between 1866 and 1925, identifying the artist constituencies and social forces that drove the new popularity of the medium. The major artists of the movement - Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, William Trost Richards, Thomas Moran, Thomas Eakins, Charles Prendergast, Childe Hassam, Edward Hopper, Charles Demuth, and many others - are represented with lavish color illustrations. The result is a fresh and beautiful look at watercolor's central place in American art and culture.

  • The Mystery of Sleep: Why a Good Night's Rest Is Vital to a Better, Healthier Life

    An authoritative and accessible guide to what happens when we shut our eyes at night

    We spend a third of our lives in bed, but how much do we really understand about how sleep affects us? In the past forty years, scientists have discovered that our sleep (or lack of it) can affect nearly every aspect of our waking lives. Poor sleep could be a sign of a disease, the result of a vitamin or iron deficiency, or the cause of numerous other problems, both sleeping and waking. Yet many people, even medical personnel, are unaware of the dangers of poor sleep. Enter Dr. Meir Kryger, a world authority on the science of sleep, with a comprehensive guide to the mysteries of slumber that combines detailed case studies, helpful tables, illustrations, and pragmatic advice.

    Everyone needs a good night's sleep, and many of us will experience some difficulty sleeping or staying awake over the course of our lifetimes (or know someone who does). Kryger's comprehensive text is a much-needed resource for insomniacs; for those who snore, can't stay awake, or experience disturbing dreams; and for the simply curious. Uniquely wide ranging, The Mystery of Sleep is more than a handbook; it is a guide to the world of sleep and the mysterious disorders that affect it.

  • Voices from the Warsaw Ghetto: Writing Our History

    Buried underground during World War II, these writings from the Warsaw Ghetto record the Holocaust in the words of its first interpreters, the victims themselves. These poems, reports, diaries, and sermons tell the story of the Warsaw Jews in real time, against time, and for all time.

  • Decorative Designs

    Incorporates over 100 designs for creating and decorating household objects ranging in size and scope from bookplates to garden seats. Balanced between instruction and inspiration, this book is aimed at the professional, the amateur and the browser.

  • Diamonds: An Early History of the King of Gems

    A lavishly illustrated, in-depth early history covering two thousand years of diamond jewelry and commerce, from the Indian mines to European merchants, courts, and workshops

    This richly illustrated history of diamonds illuminates myriad facets of the "king of gems," including a cast of larger-than-life characters such as Alexander the Great, the Mughal emperor Jahangir, and East India Company adventurers. It's an in-depth study tracing the story of diamonds from their early mining and trade more than two thousand years ago to the 1700s, when Brazil displaced India as the world's primary diamond supplier.

    Jack Ogden, a historian and gemologist specializing in ancient gems and jewelry, describes the early history of diamond jewelry, the development of diamond cutting, and how diamonds were assessed and valued. The book includes more than one hundred captivating images, from close-up full-color photographs of historic diamond-set jewelry (some previously unpublished), to photomicrographs of individual gems and illustrations of medieval manuscripts, as well as diagrams depicting historical methods of cutting and polishing diamonds.

  • Biochemistry of Copper

    Copper has long been known as essential to living systems, in part through its fundamental role in electron transport and respiration. Over the years into the present, its involvement in an ever increasing number of processes in all kinds of organisms has become apparent, and new and exciting vistas of its roles in such areas as the central nervous system, and in humoral functions, are appearing on the horizon. Although the biochemistry of this element has not been studied nearly as much as that of many others, a for- midable amount of work has been carried out. It has thus been a challenge to produce a summary of what has been found that provides both breadth and depth. My goal has been to try to be as comprehensive as possible, within some limitations. I have tried to provide basic information and basic data that should continue to be useful for a long time. The goal has also been to interpret where we currently stand in our knowledge of the structure, function, regulation, and metabolism of Cu-dependent processes and sub- stances, especially proteins. Thus, I have tried to make this a source book for historic as well as current information on all aspects of copper bio- chemistry, and a summary of our current knowledge of copper-dependent proteins and processes. Most of the research on copper has been carried out on vertebrates, especially mammals. This has played a role in the organization of the book.

  • The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe

    A fascinating exploration of the visual culture of mortality in Renaissance Europe

    We often imagine the Renaissance as an age of exceptional human progress and artistic achievement. But, intriguingly, macabre images proliferated in precisely this period: unsettling depictions of Death personified, of decaying bodies, of young lovers struck down in their prime. These morbid themes run riot in the remarkable array of artworks featured in The Ivory Mirror. Nearly 200 illustrated artworks--from ivory prayer beads to gem-encrusted jewelry to exquisitely carved small sculptures--present us with an aspect of this era that is at once darker and more familiar than we might have expected. Focused on the challenge of making choices in an increasingly complex and uncertain world, Renaissance artists turned to poignant, often macabre imagery to address the critical human concern of acknowledging death, while striving to create a personal legacy that might outlast it. The essays gathered here discuss the development and significance of this transformative art of the past, while exploring themes that are still relevant today: how does one navigate the implicit tension between mortality and morality and seek to balance individual pleasure with the pursuit of a greater good?

  • The Fall of Carthage: The Punic Wars 265-146BC

    The greatest conflict of antiquity, the struggle for supremacy between Rome and Carthage.

    The struggle between Rome and Carthage in the Punic Wars was arguably the greatest and most desperate conflict of antiquity. The forces involved and the casualties suffered by both sides were far greater than in any wars fought before the modern era, while the eventual outcome had far-reaching consequences for the history of the Western World, namely the ascendancy of Rome. An epic of war and battle, this is also the story of famous generals and leaders: Hannibal, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, and his grandson Scipio Aemilianus, who would finally bring down the walls of Carthage.

  • Sales and Service for the Wine Professional

    Specifically tailored to meet the needs of students of liquor studies, and those employed in the service of drinks, this book covers everything from customer service to corkscrew design. The sommelier (the drinks server in the restaurant) needs to have a comprehensive knowledge of all drinks products, an understanding of their taste characteristics, and the ability and skills necessary for their high quality service. This book provides the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to underpin a successful career in bartending, waitering, and the restaurant business.

  • Churches - An Architectural Guide


    '...it's great achievement is to make the English parish church not just comprehensible, but revelatory, to the interested visitor, and to remind us that even in the smallest village there are marvellous artistic treasures that we either do not notice, or whose significance and rarity we fail to grasp. A measure of a good book is that it should open our eyes, and this one genuinely does.'--Simon Heffer, Daily Telegraph.
    This accessible book is for anyone who would like to understand more about the architectural history of English churches. Clear and easy to use, the text explains the key components of church architecture-stylistic developments, functional requirements, regional variations, and arcane vocabulary. Readers can equip themselves to explore historic churches knowledgeably, evaluate dates and restoration phases, interpret stained glass and monuments, and make their own discoveries. Written by one of the editors of the Pevsner Architectural Guides and distilling years of experience visiting churches, the book includes explanations of how to learn more from building plans, tips for further research, searching for clues, and analyzing the evidence.

  • William Eggleston Portraits

    "So many people take those simple snapshots of life, but there's something about Eggleston that no one can match." --Sofia Coppola

    The eminent American photographer William Eggleston (b. 1939) was a pioneer in exploring the artistic potential of color photography. Eggleston made a name for himself with his eccentric, unexpected compositions of everyday life that were nonetheless rife with implied narrative, elevating the commonplace to art. This sumptuously illustrated book features Eggleston's masterful portraits, including the artist's first color photograph--a study of a young clerk pushing shopping carts at a supermarket--from his Los Alamos series. There are many other familiar and beloved images as well as some previously unseen photographs from his long and productive career.

    Many of Eggleston's poetic photographs portray life in his home state of Tennessee, and the people he encountered there. Eggleston frequented the 1970s Memphis club scene, where he met, befriended, and photographed musicians such as fellow Southerners Alex Chilton and Ike Turner. He also photographed celebrities including Dennis Hopper, Walter Hopps, and Eudora Welty, and became a fixture of Andy Warhol's Factory scene, dating the Warhol protege Viva. Over the past half century, he has created a powerful and enduring body of work featuring friends and family, musicians, artists, and strangers. In addition to the lavish reproductions of Eggleston's portraits, this volume includes an essay and chronology, plus an interview with Eggleston and his close family members that gives new insights into his images and artistic process.

  • The Green State in Africa

    A provocative reassessment of the relationship between states and environmental politics in Africa

    From climate-related risks such as crop failure and famine to longer-term concerns about sustainable urbanization, environmental justice, and biodiversity conservation, African states face a range of environmental issues. As Carl Death demonstrates, the ways in which they are addressing them have important political ramifications, and challenge current understandings of green politics. Death draws on almost a decade of research to reveal how central African environmental politics are to the transformation of African states.

  • Mossbauer Spectroscopy Applied to Inorganic Chemistry

    When presented with a new compound or material, the inorganic chemist will usually have several questions in mind about its composition and structure. Although a simple elemental analysis may answer many questions about its composition, the chemist will still have questions about its structure, and, ifthe material contains a metal atom, he will often want to know its oxidation state, coordination number and geometry. Further, at an increasingly frequent rate, the chemist may need details of the spin- state, magnetic and perhaps dynamic properties of the material. If the investigator is fortunate, the material or compound may contain an ele- ment such as iron, tin, antimony, iodine, gold, or one of several of the rare earth metals which are amenable to study by the Mossbauer effect. Often the Mossbauer effect can, sometimes with quite simple experiments, provide the answers to all of these questions. The goal of this book is to illustrate the effectiveness of the Mossbauer effect in providing the answers to the many questions that arise in char- acterizing new materials and, indeed, in studying known materials in more detail. Several chapters introduce the effect to the novice and provide details about the various hyperfine interactions that are the "bread and butter" of the Mossbauer spectroscopist. Three chapters deal specifically with the experimental aspects of the technique and the increasing impor- tance of sophisticated computer analysis of the resulting data.

  • Das Boot

    Filled with almost unbearable tension and excitement, DAS BOOT is one of the best stories ever written about war, a supreme novel of the Second World War and an acclaimed film and TV drama.

    It is autumn 1941 and a German U-boat commander and his crew set out on yet another hazardous patrol in the Battle of the Atlantic. Over the coming weeks they must brave the stormy waters of the Atlantic in their mission to seek out and destroy British supply ships. But the tide is beginning to turn against the Germans in the war for the North Atlantic. Their targets now travel in convoys, fiercely guarded by Royal Navy destroyers, and when contact is finally made the hunters rapidly become the hunted.

    As the U-boat is forced to hide beneath the surface of the sea a cat-and-mouse game begins, where the increasing claustrophobia of the submarine becomes an enemy just as frightening as the depth charges that explode around it. Of the 40,000 men who served on German submarines, 30,000 never returned. Written by a survivor of the U-boat fleet, DAS BOOT is a psychological drama merciless in its intensity, and a classic novel of the Second World War.

  • Western Landscapes

    Lee Friedlander (b. 1934) is best known for his images of the social landscape, in which the banal features of roadsides and city streets become a vivid backdrop for human interaction. In this extraordinary compilation, Friedlander turns his attention to the natural landscape. Western Landscapes features more than 175 images of the western United States, Canada, and Mexico, taken during the 1990s and 2000s. The selection encompasses mountains, deserts, icy plains, and forests alike, capturing the majesty of crashing waves and towering peaks as well as the humble beauty of mottled stones and tangled twigs. Friedlander also showcases in crisp black and white some of the most prominent and treasured American national parks--including Yosemite, Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, and Zion. The iconic grandeur and isolation of the west provide a counterpoint to Friedlander's portraits and scenes of modern American life, illustrating another equally compelling dimension of national identity.

  • Seapower States: Maritime Culture, Continental Empires and the Conflict That Made the Modern World

    One of the most eminent historians of our age investigates the extraordinary success of five small maritime states Andrew Lambert, author of The Challenge: Britain Against America in the Naval War of 1812 - winner of the prestigious Anderson Medal - turns his attention to Athens, Carthage, Venice, the Dutch Republic, and Britain, examining how their identities as 'seapowers' informed their actions and enabled them to achieve success disproportionate to their size. Lambert demonstrates how creating maritime identities made these states more dynamic, open, and inclusive than their lumbering continental rivals. Only when they forgot this aspect of their identity did these nations begin to decline. Recognising that the United States and China are modern naval powers - rather than seapowers - is essential to understanding current affairs, as well as the long-term trends in world history. This volume is a highly original 'big think' analysis of five states whose success - and eventual failure - is a subject of enduring interest, by a scholar at the top of his game.

  • The World`s Oldest Church - Bible, Art, and Ritual at Dura-Europos, Syria

    Michael Peppard provides a historical and theological reassessment of the oldest Christian building ever discovered, the third-century house-church at Dura-Europos. Contrary to commonly held assumptions about Christian initiation, Peppard contends that rituals here did not primarily embody notions of death and resurrection. Rather, he portrays the motifs of the church's wall paintings as those of empowerment, healing, marriage, and incarnation, while boldly reidentifying the figure of a woman formerly believed to be a repentant sinner as the Virgin Mary. This richly illustrated volume is a breakthrough work that enhances our understanding of early Christianity at the nexus of Bible, art, and ritual.

  • Accounting and Finance: A Firm Foundation

    This text gives the reader an introduction to the subject of accounting and includes themes on the treatment of finance, accounting theory, accounting standards and techniques of funds flow analysis. Also examined are the the latest accounting systems and the use of computers. The book is recognized by the Chartered Association of Certified Accountants (CACA), the Chartered Institute of Cost and Management Accountants (CIMA) and the Associate of Accounting Technicians (AAT). A lecturer's guide and tutor's manual is available free upon request.

  • Mrs.Beeton's Book of Household Management

    An affordable and attractive edition of a culinary classic. Includes a wealth of recipes to suit every taste and budget. Gives practical advice on many different aspects of household management.

  • Trace Elements in Man and Animals 6

    This book is the published proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Trace Element Metabolism in Man and Animals. The Symposium was held at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California, U.S.A. from May 31 through June 5, 1987. The decision to hold TEMA-6 at Asilomar was made at TEMA-5 in 1985. The International Guidance Committee decided to hold the meeting in California in part to recognize the significant cont i- butions made to the field of trace element metabolism by Professor Lucille S. Hurley. As such, she was the obvious choice as chair of the local organ- izing committee. One of the principal goals of Professor Hurley was that TEMA-6 serve as a forum for discussing the use and application of newer methodologies, such as molecular biology, computer modelling and stable isotopes, in studies of trace element metabolism. Based on the comments which the local organizing committee has received, this goal was achieved. The Symposium was attended by 275 scientists from 32 countries covering 6 continents. Twenty-five speakers were chosen for our plenary sessions.

  • The Golden Rules of Opening Leads

    The Golden Rules of Opening Leads is an excellent book covering a vital but often neglected part of bridge. Some of the oldest golden rules about the game, such as 'fourth highest of your longest and strongest' and 'top of a sequence' govern opening leads. Here you can find all of the rules, with examples relevant to bridge today. If you study this book carefully, you will find that the way to pick killing leads derives from what you hear in the auction and in relating that to what you see in your hand. All bridge players will benefit greatly from reading this book, whether they play rubber bridge or duplicate.

  • Hitler's Spy Chief: The Wilhelm Canaris Mystery

    How Hitler's spy chief sabotaged the German war effort.

    Wilhelm Canaris was appointed by Hitler to head the Abwehr (the German secret service) 18 months after the Nazis came to power. But Canaris turned against the Fuhrer and the Nazi regime, believing that Hitler would start a war Germany could not win. In 1938 he was involved in an attempted coup, undermined by British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain. In 1940 he sabotaged the German plan to invade England, and fed General Franco vital information that helped him keep Spain out of the war.

    For years he played a dangerous double game, desperately trying to keep one step ahead of the Gestapo. The SS chief, Heinrich Himmler, became suspicious of the Abwehr and by 1944, when Abwehr personnel were involved in the attempted assassination of Hitler, he had the evidence to arrest Canaris himself. Canaris was executed a few weeks before the end of the war.

  • Cognitive-Behavior Modification: An Integrative Approach

    This book is an account of a personal journey through a research program. A number of people have helped guide my way. To them I am deeply grateful. Special thanks are offered to my students, whose constant stimulation and provocation were incentives to write this book. Moreover, in the belief that they would never show the initiative to put together a festschrift for me (Le., a book dedicated to someone for his contributions), I decided to do it myself. Several people cared enough to offer editorial criticisms, namely, Myles Genest, Barney Gilmore, Roy Cameron, Sherryl Goodman, and Dennis Turk. The reader benefits from their perspicacity. Finally, to my parents, who taught me to talk to myself, and to my family, without whose constant input this book would have been completed much sooner, but would have been much less fun, I dedicate this book. D.M. 5 Contents Prologue 11 Chapter 1 17 Self-Instructional Training Hyperactive, Impulsive Children: An Illustration of a Search for a Deficit 23 Luria's Model (24), Private Speech and Mediational Skills (27) Self-Instructional Treatment of Hyperactive, Impulsive Children: A Beginning 31 Empirical Studies of Self-Instructional Training 34 Combining Self-Instructions and Operant Procedures (44), Reasoning Rediscovered (47), Importance of Attributional Style (48), Taking Stock (54) Chapter 2 The Clinical Application of Self-Instructional Training to Other Clinical Populations: Three Illustrations 55 Social Isolates 56 Creative Problem-Solving 58 Adult Schizophrenics 68 What Shall We Say to Ourselves When We Obtain Negative Results? 77 7 8 Contents Chapter 3

  • Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World

    Caroline of Ansbach (1683-1737), Augusta of Saxe-Gotha (1719-1772), and Charlotte of Mecklenberg-Strelitz (1744-1818) were three German princesses who became Queens Consort--or, in the case of Augusta, Queen in Waiting, Regent, and Princess Dowager--of Great Britain, and were linked by their early years at European princely courts, their curiosity, aspirations, and an investment in Enlightenment thought. This sumptuously illustrated book considers the ways these powerful, intelligent women left enduring marks on British culture through a wide range of activities: the promotion of the court as a dynamic forum of the Hanoverian regime; the enrichment of the royal collection of art; the advancement of science and industry; and the creation of gardens and menageries. Objects included range from spectacular state portraits to pedagogical toys to plant and animal specimens, and reveal how the new and novel intermingled with the traditional.

  • Ginkgo - The Tree That Time Forgot

    Perhaps the world's most distinctive tree, ginkgo has remained stubbornly unchanged for more than two hundred million years. A living link to the age of dinosaurs, it survived the great ice ages as a relic in China, but it earned its reprieve when people first found it useful about a thousand years ago. Today ginkgo is beloved for the elegance of its leaves, prized for its edible nuts, and revered for its longevity. This engaging book tells the rich and engaging story of a tree that people saved from extinction--a story that offers hope for other botanical biographies that are still being written. Inspired by the historic ginkgo that has thrived in London's Kew Gardens since the 1760s, renowned botanist Peter Crane explores the history of the ginkgo from its mysterious origin through its proliferation, drastic decline, and ultimate resurgence. Crane also highlights the cultural and social significance of the ginkgo: its medicinal and nutritional uses, its power as a source of artistic and religious inspiration, and its importance as one of the world's most popular street trees. Readers of this book will be drawn to the nearest ginkgo, where they can experience firsthand the timeless beauty of the oldest tree on Earth.

  • The Calculus of Variations and Optimal Control

    When the Tyrian princess Dido landed on the North African shore of the Mediterranean sea she was welcomed by a local chieftain. He offered her all the land that she could enclose between the shoreline and a rope of knotted cowhide. While the legend does not tell us, we may assume that Princess Dido arrived at the correct solution by stretching the rope into the shape of a circular arc and thereby maximized the area of the land upon which she was to found Carthage. This story of the founding of Carthage is apocryphal. Nonetheless it is probably the first account of a problem of the kind that inspired an entire mathematical discipline, the calculus of variations and its extensions such as the theory of optimal control. This book is intended to present an introductory treatment of the calculus of variations in Part I and of optimal control theory in Part II. The discussion in Part I is restricted to the simplest problem of the calculus of variations. The topic is entirely classical; all of the basic theory had been developed before the turn of the century. Consequently the material comes from many sources; however, those most useful to me have been the books of Oskar Bolza and of George M. Ewing. Part II is devoted to the elementary aspects of the modern extension of the calculus of variations, the theory of optimal control of dynamical systems.

  • The Vincent Van Gogh Atlas

    A fascinating guide to Van Gogh's itinerant life, with vibrant images and stories about the many places where he lived and worked

    This exciting publication familiarizes readers of all ages with the many fascinating facets of Vincent van Gogh (1853--1890)--artist, correspondent, traveler, and modern explorer of Europe's cities and countryside. Thanks to Van Gogh's wanderlust and the rapid expansion of the railway system in Europe in the late 19th century, Van Gogh covered thousands of miles in his lifetime. He lived and worked in more than twenty locations: from the peaceful countryside of the Netherlands and the south of France to the hustle and bustle of big cities such as London and Paris. Authors Nienke Denekamp and Rene van Blerk trace the artist's route across Europe "from Z to A," beginning in his birthplace of Zundert in the southern Netherlands and ending where he died, in Auvers-sur-Oise near Paris. Each location is described with lively and accessible texts, comprehensive timelines, city and country maps, contemporary photographs, and related artworks by Van Gogh.

    Featuring an eye-catching design, captivating excerpts from Van Gogh's vast body of letters, and hundreds of color images, The Vincent van Gogh Atlas offers a truly unique version of the enduringly compelling story of Van Gogh and instills an appreciation of the many journeys--literal and figurative--that the artist made throughout his life.

  • Art in the Age of the Internet : 1989 to Today

    Featuring essays by leading curators, scholars, and critics, this book provides an in-depth look at how the internet has impacted visual art over the past three decades. From the fall of the Berlin Wall to Black Lives Matter, the internet's promise to foster communication across borders and democratize information has evolved alongside its rapidly developing technologies. While it has introduced radical changes to how art is made, disseminated, and perceived, the internet has also inspired artists to create inventive and powerful work that addresses new conceptions of community and identity, modes of surveillance, and tactics for resistance. Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today traces the relationship between internet culture and artistic practice through the work of contemporary artists such as Ed Atkins, Camille Henrot, and Anicka Yi, and looks back to pre-internet pioneers including Nam June Paik and Lynn Hershman Leeson. Conversations between artists reveal how they have tackled similar issues using different technological tools. Touching on a variety of topics that range from emergent ideas of the body and human enhancement to the effects of digital modes of production on traditional media, and featuring more than 200 images of works including painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects, this volume is packed with insightful revelations about how the internet has affected the trajectory of contemporary art.

  • Celtic Image

    A fascinating introduction to the artistic images, motifs and artefacts of the Celtic peoples of Brittany, Cornwall, Ireland, Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales, comprising informative text and enchanting illustrations. 25 colour and 60 black-and-white illustrations.

  • Frank Stella Unbound: Literature and Printmaking

    Focusing on the vital role of literature in the development of the artistic practice of Frank Stella (b. 1936), this insightful book looks at four transformative series of prints made between 1984 and 1999. Each of these series is named after a literary work--the Had Gadya (a playful song traditionally sung at the end of the Passover Seder), Italian Folktales, compiled by Italo Calvino, Moby-Dick by Herman Melville, and The Dictionary of Imaginary Places by Alberto Manguel and Gianni Guadalupi. This investigation offers a critical new perspective on Stella: an examination of his interdisciplinary process, literary approach, and interest in the lessons of art history as crucial factors for his artistic development as a printmaker. Mitra Abbaspour, Calvin Brown, and Erica Cooke examine how Stella's dynamic engagement with literature paralleled the artist's experimentation with unconventional printmaking techniques and engendered new ways of representing spatial depth to unleash the narrative potential of abstract forms.

  • Asia in Amsterdam - The Culture of Luxury in the Golden Age

    A fascinating survey of the rich artistic and cultural impact of Asia on the Netherlands in the 17th century



    This lavishly illustrated catalogue discusses the Asian luxury goods that were imported into the Netherlands during the 17th century and demonstrates the overwhelming impact these works of art had on Dutch life and art during the Golden Age. Written by a team of 30 international scholars, this volume presents seven essays and catalogue entries on 150 works of art, including Dutch and Asian paintings, textiles, ceramics, lacquer, furniture, silver, diamonds, and jewelry.

    From the Dutch settlements throughout Asia--including Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, China, and Japan--Dutch maritime traders brought an astonishing range of luxuries back to the Netherlands. Dutch consumers were enthralled with these foreign goods, which brought new colors, patterns, and textures to their interiors and wardrobes. As seen in the book's many illustrations, Dutch artists also found inspiration in these objects and incorporated them into portraits, genre scenes, and particularly still-life paintings. Dutch artists and craftspeople also adapted distinctly Asian technologies, such as porcelain and lacquer, to create new works of art inspired by Asia. This catalogue weaves together the complex stories of these diverse works of art and presents fascinating portraits of the dynamic cities of Amsterdam and Batavia (Jakarta)--the Dutch trade center in Asia during the 17th century.

  • Examining the Submicron World

    An Institute like ours cannot help but lend credence to the notion of the late Derek J. de Solla Price of Yale University that "the scientific revolution was largely the improvement, invention and use of a series of instruments . . . . that expanded the reach of science in innumerable directions". Most of science today and in years gone by depends on the experimental observation of struc- ture on the small scale with microscopes, and on the large scale with telescopes. The first instruments to expand the observational range of the human eye were simple optical systems, designed in the case of microscopes and telescopes to magnify the image. The big breakthrough in the 17th century was not when Galileo first turned his telescope to the heavens, but when improvements in lens-grinding techniques allowed eyeglass makers to make the first telescope. Early microscopy revealed new and previously unsuspected microstruc- tures in biological and non-biological materials and thus helped to enlarge on the understanding of the relationship between structure and properties. The natural inclination of all microscopists, the desire to observe ever smaller structures, was satisfied by the construction of higher quality optical systems which reduced the aberrations limiting the usable magnification. The modem optical microscope is the result of this evolution in design and construction, and it can be operated easily to achieve close to the theoretical resolution.

  • Coffee, Tea, and Chocolate: Consuming the World

    Coffee, tea, and chocolate were all the rage in Enlightenment Europe. These fashionable beverages profoundly shaped modes of sociability and patterns of consumption, yet none of the plants required for their preparation was native to the continent: coffee was imported from the Levant, tea from Asia, and chocolate from Mesoamerica. Their introduction to 17th-century Europe revolutionized drinking habits and social customs. It also spurred an insatiable demand for specialized vessels such as hot beverage services and tea canisters, coffee cups and chocolate pots.

    This beautiful book demonstrates how the paraphernalia associated with coffee, tea, and chocolate can eloquently evoke the culture of these new beverages and the material pleasures that surrounded them. Contributors address such topics as the politics of coffee consumption in 18th-century Germany; 18th-century visual satires on the European consumption of tea, coffee, and chocolate; and the design history of coffee pots in the United States between the colonial period and the present.

  • Spin Labeling: Theory and Applications

    We present this special topics volume on an area which has not received thorough coverage for over 12 years. Spin Labeling: Theory and Applications represents a complete update on new theoretical aspects and applications of the spin-label method. In the "line-shape theory" sections, we are especially pleased to include an IBM-compatible diskette supplied by David Schneider and Jack Freed which contains fast, accurate, ready-to-use software for slow-motion simulations. Barney Bales discusses inhomogeneous broadening phenomena in detail. Several developments in techniques and interpretation in saturation transfer spectroscopy have appeared since the publica- tion of Spin Labeling II: Theory and Applications (L. J. Berliner, ed., Academic Press, 1979). We have included an up-to-date chapter on spin-label applications by M. A. Hemminga and P. A. de Jager. By incorporating 15N and deuterium into nitroxide spin labels, several unique advantages are derived in line-shape analysis. Albert Beth and Bruce Robinson have contributed a detailed chapter on the analysis of these labels in the slow-motion regime while Jane Park and Wolfgang Trommer present the advantages for specific biochemical examples in our "applications" section. Derek Marsh's contri- bution on spin-label spectral analysis may be regarded as a summary chapter which touches on several of the detailed spectral analysis methods described in the earlier chapters.

  • The Book of Whispers

    A harrowing account of the Armenian Genocide documented through the stories of those who managed to survive and descendants who refuse to forget

    The grandchild of Armenians who escaped widespread massacres during the Ottoman Empire a century ago, Varujan Vosganian grew up in Romania hearing firsthand accounts of those who had witnessed horrific killings, burned villages, and massive deportations. In this moving chronicle of the Armenian people's almost unimaginable tragedy, the author transforms true events into a work of fiction firmly grounded in survivor testimonies and historical documentation.

    Across Syrian desert refugee camps, Russian tundra, and Romanian villages, the book chronicles individual lives destroyed by ideological and authoritarian oppression. But this novel tells an even wider human story. Evocative of all the great sufferings that afflicted the twentieth century--world wars, concentration camps, common graves, statelessness, and others--this book belongs to all peoples whose voices have been lost. Hailed for its documentary value and sensitive authenticity, Vosganian's work has become an international phenomenon.

  • Heterochrony in Evolution: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    ... an adult poet is simply an individual in a state of arrested development-in brief, a sort of moron. Just as all of us, in utero, pass through a stage in which we are tadpoles, ... so all of us pass through a state, in our nonage, when we are poets. A youth of seventeen who is not a poet is simply a donkey: his development has been arrested even anterior to that of the tadpole. But a man of fifty who still writes poetry is either an unfortunate who has never developed, intellectually, beyond his teens, or a conscious buffoon who pretends to be something he isn't-something far younger and juicier than he actually is. -H. 1. Mencken, High and Ghostly Matters, Prejudices: Fourth Series (1924) Where would evolution be, Without this thing, heterochrony? -M. L. McKinney (1987) One of the joys of working in a renascent field is that it is actually possible to keep up with the literature. So it is with mixed emotions that we heterochronists (even larval forms like myself) view the recent "veritable explosion of interest in heterochrony" (in Gould's words in this volume). On the positive side, it is ob- viously necessary and desirable to extend and expand the inquiry; but one regrets that already we are beginning to talk past, lose track of, and even ignore each other as we carve out individual interests.

  • Jasper Johns and Edvard Munch: Inspiration and Transformation

    A rich study exploring the connections, creative processes, and themes shared by two world- renowned artists

    At a crucial point midway through his career, American painter and printmaker Jasper Johns (b. 1930) looked to the art of Norwegian Expressionist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) for inspiration. Munch's innovative working methods and defining themes of love, anxiety, illness, and death infused Johns's work with new meaning, allowing him a broadened range of expression that propelled his return to recognizable imagery after a decade of abstraction.

    This groundbreaking publication is the first to describe precisely how and when Johns began to explore Munch's imagery and ideas. At the same time, it takes a comprehensive view of each artist's career, giving readers a deeper understanding of Johns's connection to his predecessor. Through new scholarship and copious illustration, Ravenal makes the persuasive case that Munch should be considered one of the catalysts for the sea change that occurred in Johns's art of the early 1980s.

  • The Lost World of Byzantium

    A fresh, concise, and accessible history of one of the medieval world's greatest empires

    For more than a millennium, the Byzantine Empire presided over the juncture between East and West, as well as the transition from the classical to the modern world. Jonathan Harris, a leading scholar of Byzantium, eschews the usual run-through of emperors and battles and instead recounts the empire's extraordinary history by focusing each chronological chapter on an archetypal figure, family, place, or event.

    Harris's action-packed introduction presents a civilization rich in contrasts, combining orthodox Christianity with paganism, and classical Greek learning with Roman power. Frequently assailed by numerous armies--including those of Islam--Byzantium nonetheless survived and even flourished by dint of its somewhat unorthodox foreign policy and its sumptuous art and architecture, which helped to embed a deep sense of Byzantine identity in its people.

    Enormously engaging and utilizing a wealth of sources to cover all major aspects of the empire's social, political, military, religious, cultural, and artistic history, Harris's study illuminates the very heart of Byzantine civilization and explores its remarkable and lasting influence on its neighbors and on the modern world.

  • Europe Isn't Working

    Europe's centre-left is rapidly falling out of love with the European single currency. Fifteen years after its creation, British journalists Larry Elliott and Dan Atkinson assess its performance to show why. Looking at a range of key indicators the authors show how the euro has failed to deliver on its promise of more jobs, more growth and greater equality. Instead it has undermined the European Union. Elliott and Atkinson compare the European Central Bank to the Federal Reserve, arguing that the architects of the euro subjugated economic measures to political considerations. Consequently, countries that didn't meet the economic convergence criteria were still allowed entry. The end result is a dysfunctional currency union that is unable to cope with difficult economic circumstances. Assessing the situations in Greece, Germany, Italy, France, Ireland, and Iceland, as well as Britain, they show that the current policy of kicking the can down the road and hoping that something will turn up is proving increasingly unpopular with the currency's one-time fans in progressive politics. This engaging and accessibly written volume will be widely read by economists, pundits, and policymakers as Britian considers its future relationship with Europe.

  • Paolo Veronese and the Practice of Painting in Late Renaissance Venice

    One of the premier artists of Renaissance Venice, Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) enjoyed a successful career creating splendid and sophisticated paintings for an elite clientele. Focusing on Veronese's materials, workshop organization, and remarkably varied techniques, this important book provides a rich examination of the artist's painting practice and how it developed throughout his career--from his initial training in Verona through the height of his fame in Venice. Diana Gisolfi's multidisciplinary approach brings together information on the physical qualities of Veronese's works discovered during recent conservation projects, a fresh look at contemporary texts from the 16th century, and a nuanced understanding of the world of Venetian artists and their patrons. This innovative approach elucidates the working life of Veronese and his circle of contemporaries in new and fascinating ways.

  • Famous Bridge Records

    Records have a perennial fascination and the authors have brought together a riveting collection of record-breaking deals from the history of bridge. What is the fewest high-card points on which someone has made 3NT, 4 Spades, 5 Clubs, 6 Diamonds, 6NT or 7NT? What is the biggest penalty ever suffered or the worst adverse swing? How about the longest auction ever, the most costly opening lead, the greatest number of redoubled overtricks or the greatest number of redoubled undertricks? The answers are all here.

    As ever with David Bird's books, you will be greatly entertained and painlessly instructed at the same time.

  • Size and Scaling in Primate Biology

    In very general terms, "scaling" can be defined as the structural and func- tional consequences of differences in size (or scale) among organisms of more or less similar design. Interest in certain aspects of body size and scaling in primate biology (e. g., relative brain size) dates to the turn of the century, and scientific debate and dialogue on numerous aspects of this general subject have continued to be a primary concern of primatologists, physical an- thropologists, and other vertebrate biologists up to the present. Indeed, the intensity and scope of such research on primates have grown enormously in the past decade or so. Information continues to accumulate rapidly from many different sources, and the task of synthesizing the available data and theories on any given topic is becoming increasingly formidable. In addition to the formal exchange of new ideas and information among scientific experts in specific areas of scaling research, two of the major goals of this volume are an assessment of our progress toward understanding various size-related phe- nomena in primates and the identification of future prospects for continuing advances in this realm. Although the subject matter and specific details of the issues considered in the 20 chapters that follow are very diversified, all topics share the same fundamental and unifying biological theme: body size variation in primates and its implications for behavior and ecology, anatomy and physiology, and evolution.

  • Heretics and Believers: A History of the English Reformation

    WINNER OF THE 2018 WOLFSON HISTORY PRIZE

    Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall's sweeping new history--the first major overview for general readers in a generation--argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of "reform" in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora's Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life.

    With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of "religion" itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

  • Small-great Objects: Anni and Josef Albers in the Americas

    Small-Great Objects presents a remarkable look into the art-collecting practices of two of modern art's most widely influential figures, Anni (1899-1994) and Josef (1888-1976) Albers. Their impressive collection of over 1,400 objects from Latin America, namely Mexico and Peru, represents a conscious endeavor that goes well beyond that of a casual hobby, displaying a deep appreciation for the art, textiles, and overall ingenuity of the ancient American world. This insightful book draws on primary-source materials such as the couple's letters, personal papers, and archival photographs--many never before published--and demonstrates their conviction that these Prehispanic objects displayed a formal sophistication and bold abstraction that defy the prevalent conception of the works as "primitive." Moreover, it shows how the Alberses spread their appreciation of the ancient world to others, through their teachings, their writings, and their own art practices.

  • Bridge Odds for Practical Players

    Backing outsiders has ruined many a punter at the bridge table as well as at the race track. Few players have any idea of how to harness the odds to solve problems that constantly recur. Which is the best line of play? Is it better to finesse or play for the drop? Will the diamonds break? Can the chances be combined? What are the exact odds?

    Here is a simple guide to solving the problems that arise in assessing the odds in play at bridge. Keeping theory to a minimum, the authors show by means of many practical examples how to calculate the odds and how to come up with the right answer at the bridge table. Anyone who learns to apply the principles set out in this book need never again be accused of playing against the odds.

  • The Country House Library

    Beginning with new evidence that cites the presence of books in Roman villas and concluding with present day vicissitudes of collecting, this generously illustrated book presents a complete survey of British and Irish country house libraries. Replete with engaging anecdotes about owners and librarians, the book features fascinating information on acquisition bordering on obsession, the process of designing library architecture, and the care (and neglect) of collections. The author also disputes the notion that these libraries were merely for show, arguing that many of them were profoundly scholarly, assembled with meticulous care, and frequently used for intellectual pursuits. For those who love books and the libraries in which they are collected and stored, The Country House Library is an essential volume to own.

  • Napoleon: The Imperial Household

    The dazzling splendors of the court of Napoleon I (1769-1821) reflected the grandeur and ambitions of the greatest empire of the day. This luxurious volume re-creates the ambiance and captures the spirit that prevailed in the French court during the Empire through the material manifestations of the Imperial Household. The Imperial Household, a key institution during Napoleon's reign, was responsible for the daily lives of the Imperial family; it consisted of six departments, each headed by a high-ranking dignitary of the Empire: the grand chaplain, grand master of ceremonies, grand marshal of the Palace, grand master of the hunt, grand chamberlain, and grand equerry - each intimately involved with every moment of pageantry in the court. Featured here are more than 250 works of fine and decorative art, the visual magnificence of which was part of a calculated and deliberate effort to fashion a monarchic identity for the new emperor.

  • System Design Modeling and Metamodeling

    This book is a venture in the worlds of modeling and of metamodeling. At this point, I will not reveal to readers what constitutes metamodeling. Suf- fice it to say that the pitfalls and shortcomings of modeling can be cured only if we resort to a higher level of inquiry called metainquiry and metadesign. We reach this level by the process of abstraction. The book contains five chapters from my previous work, Applied General Systems Theory (Harper and Row, London and New York, First Edition 1974, Second Edition 1978). More than ten years after its publication, this material still appears relevant to the main thrust of system design. This book is dedicated to all those who are involved in changing the world for the better. In a way we all are involved in system design: from the city manager who struggles with the problems of mass transportation or the consolidation of a city and its suburbs to the social worker who tries to provide benefits to the urban poor. It includes the engineer who designs the shuttle rockets. It involves the politician engaged in drafting a bill to recycle containers, or one to prevent pesticide contamination of our food. The politician might even need system design to chart his or her own re-election campaign.

  • Growth of Crystals

    This volume, as the previous ones, consists primarily of review artic1es. However, it also contains a large quantity of original material on the growth of crystals and films. Priority is given to experimental work. Only two artic1es are concerned exc1usively with the theory of crystal growth. Theoretical aspects are treated in several others. This volume is divided into three parts. Part I, "Epitaxy and Transformations in Thin Films," stems from the current broad application of lasers and optical effects in general to crystal growth (in particular, the growth of thin films). The first three artic1es of the book are devoted to this topic. In particular, the laser pulse vaporization method, for which a comparatively slow deposition rate is typical (which should not always be viewed as a drawback), is distinguished by the unique kinetics of the initial growth stages. These are not entirely explained. However, this method is completely suitable for oriented or generally ordered growth of films under otherwise equal conditions. Another artic1e of this section is based on use of ultrashort (down to picosecond) laser pulses. It emphasizes the nonequilibrium processes of crystallization and decrystallization that are characteristic for such influences. In particular, material heated above its melting point and metastable states in the semiconductor melt exhibit these qualities.

  • Atoms in Strong Fields

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  • Grave New World: The End of Globalization, the Return of History

    A controversial look at the end of globalization and what it means for prosperity, peace, and the global economic order Globalization, long considered the best route to economic prosperity, is not inevitable. An approach built on the principles of free trade and, since the 1980s, open capital markets, is beginning to fracture. With disappointing growth rates across the Western world, nations are no longer willing to sacrifice national interests for global growth; nor are their leaders able-or willing-to sell the idea of pursuing a global agenda of prosperity to their citizens. Combining historical analysis with current affairs, economist Stephen D. King provides a provocative and engaging account of why globalization is being rejected, what a world ruled by rival states with conflicting aims might look like, and how the pursuit of nationalist agendas could result in a race to the bottom. King argues that a rejection of globalization and a return to "autarky" will risk economic and political conflict, and he uses lessons from history to gauge how best to avoid the worst possible outcomes.

  • The Nuclear Lion

    . . . human kind cannot bear very much reality. T. S. ELIOT, Four Quartets When I was a little child, I lived in an old and somewhat rickety house by the sea. When the winter wind blew, the house would shake and tremble, and cold drafts would whistle through cracks in the walls. You might have thought that lying in bed in a dark room on such cold, windy nights would have frightened me. But it had just the opposite effect: having known this en- vironment since birth, I actually found the shaking of the house, the whistling of the wind, and the crashing of the sea to be comforting, and I was lulled to sleep by these familiar sounds. They signaled to me that all was right with the world and that the forces of nature were operating in the normal way. But I did have a problem. On the dimly lit landing of the staircase leading up to my bedroom, there was a large and dark picture of a male lion, sitting as such lions do with his massive paws in front of him and his head erect, turned slightly to the right, and staring straight out at you with yellow blazing eyes. I had great difficulty getting past that lion. Someone would have to hold my hand and take me up to bed, past the dreaded picture.

  • Pretty Gentlemen: Macaroni Men and the Eighteenth-Century Fashion World

    The term "macaroni" was once as familiar a label as "punk" or "hipster" is today. In this handsomely illustrated book devoted to notable 18th-century British male fashion, award-winning author and fashion historian Peter McNeil brings together dress, biography, and historical events with the broader visual and material culture of the late 18th century. For thirty years, macaroni was a highly topical word, yielding a complex set of social, sexual, and cultural associations. Pretty Gentlemen is grounded in surviving dress, archival documents, and art spanning hierarchies and genres, from scurrilous caricature to respectful portrait painting. Celebrities hailed and mocked as macaroni include politician Charles James Fox, painter Richard Cosway, freed slave Julius "Soubise," and criminal parson Reverend Dodd. The style also rapidly spread to neighboring countries in cross-cultural exchange, while Horace Walpole, George III, and Queen Charlotte were active critics and observers of these foppish men.

  • Ji Yun-Fei: Last Days of Village Wen

    Drawing upon the Cleveland Museum of Art's world-renowned collection of Chinese paintings, this volume presents an insightful study of a newly acquired work that occasions dialogue between traditional forms of art and contemporary environmental issues. Centered on a current and highly controversial venture that involves diverting water from the country's Yangzi River, Ji Yun-fei's (b. 1963) visually complex painting, Last Days of Village Wen, uses the traditional Chinese form of the scroll to convey a fictional narrative addressing real and palpable concerns. The contentious undertaking has resulted in mass human migration and destruction of ecosystems, spurring the artist to reflect on shifting values and to use painting as a vehicle for potential change. This book explores how Ji Yun-fei's work situates itself within that tense tract between the old and the new, as he incorporates elements of both history and fantasy to highlight modern society's increasing detachment from ancient notions of harmonious human/nature relationships.

  • Sophie Podolski: Le Pays Où Tout Est Permis/The Country Where Everything Is Permitted

    This bilingual publication offers an unprecedented exploration of the work of Belgian poet and artist Sophie Podolski (1953-1974), who has lingered in obscurity since her untimely death at the age of 21. Podolski's work is emblematic of a time marked by sexual liberation, antipsychiatry, and youth disenchantment. As a self-taught writer and artist, she wrote in an uninhibited and provocative style about life, popular culture, and conformist society. While she was known primarily as a poet during her lifetime, this book places emphasis on Podolski's visual practice and highly personal iconography. As well as the original manuscript of her only book, The Country Where Everything Is Permitted (1972), this book showcases Podolski's remarkable body of graphic works, with more than 100 drawings and some of her earliest etchings.

  • Reviews of Plasma Chemistry

    The current volume includes articles on the elementary processes in nonsymmetric collisions of inert gas atoms, the parameters of gaseous dimers, and the physical properties of strongly coupled plasmas.

  • Dismissal: A Guide to Effective Management Procedures

    Dismissals that are properly dealt with show that the employer will not tolerate descipline problems and can deal with them swiftly and effectively. With reference to case law, this book charts the progress of a typical disciplinary problem at work, from the first offence onwards. It highlights good and bad employment practices. By the end, the employer will have confirmed or developed an effective procedure that will stand the test of a tribunal hearing.

  • The Future of Law and Economics: Essays in Reform and Recollection

    In a concise, compelling argument, one of the founders and most influential advocates of the law and economics movement divides the subject into two separate areas, which he identifies with Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. The first, Benthamite, strain, "economic analysis of law," examines the legal system in the light of economic theory and shows how economics might render law more effective. The second strain, law and economics, gives equal status to law, and explores how the more realistic, less theoretical discipline of law can lead to improvements in economic theory. It is the latter approach that Judge Calabresi advocates, in a series of eloquent, thoughtful essays that will appeal to students and scholars alike.

  • Anti-Pluralism: The Populist Threat to Liberal Democracy

    Present-day challenges to liberal democracy call on leaders to make growth more inclusive, address fraught social and cultural issues frankly, and manage the tensions of political life

  • Why Liberalism Failed

    "One of the most important political books of 2018."--Rod Dreher, American Conservative

    Of the three dominant ideologies of the twentieth century--fascism, communism, and liberalism--only the last remains. This has created a peculiar situation in which liberalism's proponents tend to forget that it is an ideology and not the natural end-state of human political evolution. As Patrick Deneen argues in this provocative book, liberalism is built on a foundation of contradictions: it trumpets equal rights while fostering incomparable material inequality; its legitimacy rests on consent, yet it discourages civic commitments in favor of privatism; and in its pursuit of individual autonomy, it has given rise to the most far-reaching, comprehensive state system in human history. Here, Deneen offers an astringent warning that the centripetal forces now at work on our political culture are not superficial flaws but inherent features of a system whose success is generating its own failure.

  • Pollock's Modernism

    Pollock's Modernism provides a new interpretation of the art of Jackson Pollock (1912-1956), one that is based on a phenomenological investigation of the pictorial effects of particular paintings. Focusing on major works that span the artist's career - including Mural (1943), Cathedral (1947), Number 1A, 1948, One: Number 31, 1950, and Portrait and a Dream (1953) - Michael Schreyach argues that Pollock's achievement is best understood by attending to how, technically and formally, he instituted certain modes of pictorial address and structures of beholding in his paintings. From this perspective, Pollock is shown to be an artist who transformed the means by which the phenomenological interdependence of sensation and cognition in our embodied experience could be represented. Offering a provocative counter-argument to dominant accounts of Pollock's work, this book advances bold claims about Pollock's intentions as they are expressed in his art, and illuminates what constituted the artist's unique form of modernism at mid-century.

  • The Glory of Saint George - Man, Dragon, and Death

    This book offers the first-ever survey of artistic depictions of the legend of Saint George defeating the dragon. The earliest existing references to this episode in the hagiography of Saint George date from the 11th century, and the mythical conflict has entertained the imaginations of artists ever since. Copiously illustrated, this book includes varied representations in painting, sculpture, engraving, and more by artists from Raphael and Peter Paul Rubens to Odilon Redon and Andy Warhol. In addition, the artists David Claerbout, Giuseppe Penone, Luc Tuymans, and Angel Vergara Santiago have been invited to contribute their own interpretations of the story, and these new works are also featured. The contemporary perspective is further explored in the book through essays that trace the shifting resonance of the allegory, positing that it has evolved to become symbolic of man's internal struggle as he attempts to fulfill his destiny.

  • Facture: Conservation, Science, Art History - Volume 2: Art in Context

    Facture presents the latest conservation research on masterpieces from the National Gallery of Art, Washington, spanning the early Renaissance through the present and encompassing a range of media. Volume 2 examines great art of two very different eras--the Italian Renaissance and the 20th century--and puts in new contexts works such as Giotto's Madonna and Child, bronze sculptures by Auguste Rodin, watercolors by John Marin, early paintings by Andy Warhol, and Mark Rothko's multiforms, which mark the birth of his abstraction. Seven essays are illustrated with outstandingly detailed photography and share a common approach. They each begin with meticulous material and analytical study of the work and then place the findings in a broader historical context, providing new perspectives on well-known works. A fascinating contribution to interdisciplinary scholarship on art, this publication extends a tradition of fostering dialogue among art historians, scientists, and conservators in the international community.

  • Telecommunications Switching

    The motivation for this book stems from an early exposure to the book Ap- plied Mechanics by John Perry. Professor Perry strove to encourage his readers to understand the applications and use of mathematics in engineering with- out insisting that they become immersed in pure mathematics. The following text uses this approach to the application of telecommunications switching. Readers wishing to study the derivation and proof of formulas will be able to do so using relevant references. The existence of low-cost programmable calculators frees practicing engineers from much laborious calculation, allowing more time for creative design and application of the art. The reader should not need to be able to derive formulas in order to apply them just as, to quote Professor Perry, "He should not have to be able to design a watch in order to tell time ... The material for this book has been drawn from my own experience in the field. Inevitably, however, I have used CCITT and Bell System publications for references and in some cases quotation, and I gratefully acknowledge permission for their use. I am also grateful to Stromberg Carlson Corporation for their earlier encour- agement and support without which this book would not have been possible. Thanks are also due to Fred Hadfield for his advice and assistance in the preparation of the many figures and to my wife Ada for her support and patience as I pursued the demanding but interesting task of producing the text.

  • Leading With Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People

    What every leader needs to know about dignity and how to create a culture in which everyone thrives

    This landmark book from an expert in dignity studies explores the essential but underrecognized role of dignity as part of good leadership. Extending the reach of her award-winning book Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict, Donna Hicks now contributes a specific, practical guide to achieving a culture of dignity.

    Most people know very little about dignity, the author has found, and when leaders fail to respect the dignity of others, conflict and distrust ensue. Hicks highlights three components of leading with dignity: what one must know in order to honor dignity and avoid violating it; what one must do to lead with dignity; and how one can create a culture of dignity in any organization, whether corporate, religious, governmental, healthcare, or beyond. Brimming with key research findings, real-life case studies, and workable recommendations, this book fills an important gap in our understanding of how best to be together in a conflict-ridden world.

  • Blood, Sweat and Arrogance: The Myths of Churchill's War

    Why the British forces fought so badly in World War II and who was to blame

    Gordon Corrigan's Mud, Blood and Poppycock overturned the myths that surround the First World War. Now he challenges our assumptions about the Second World War in this brilliant, caustic narrative that exposes just how close Britain came to losing. He reveals how Winston Churchill bears a heavy responsibility for the state of our forces in 1939, and how his interference in military operations caused a string of disasters. The reputations of some of our most famous generals are also overturned: above all, Montgomery, whose post-war stature owes more to his skill with a pen than talent for command. But this is not just a story of personalities.

    Gordon Corrigan investigates how the British, who had the biggest and best army in the world in 1918, managed to forget everything they had learned in just twenty years. The British invented the tank, but in 1940 it was the Germans who showed the world how to use them. After we avoided defeat, but the slimmest of margins, it was a very long haul to defeat Hitler's army, and one in which the Russians would ultimately bear the heaviest burden.

  • Moholy-Nagy: Future Present

    An unprecedented study of an important 20th-century artist and his diverse body of work
    This exceptional book offers a fresh and extensive examination of the work of pioneering artist Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946). The first major American survey of his oeuvre in nearly a half century and the most extensive English-language book on the artist in thirty years, the catalogue offers an integrated presentation of Moholy's production across a range of art forms including painting, sculpture, photography, graphic design, film, advertising, and theater.
    Distinguished scholars offer new insights into Moholy's materials and working methods; the relation among writing, administration, and art making in his practice; and his influence on contemporary art. Particular emphasis is given to Moholy's American years and his leadership of the Chicago Bauhaus as well as his reception as a painter.
    Over 300 works are illustrated in color, including the artist's early paintings and photograms, his whimsical photomontages---all of which are reproduced together here for the first time---and late works in Plexiglas. Beautifully designed and produced, with a PVC plastic jacket printed on the inside and a foil stamped casewrap, the book is a marvelous tribute to this phenomenally innovative artist.

  • Fabled Cities: Samarkand, Bukhara, Khiva

    Samarkand, Bukhara and Khiva have been known as among the most beautiful cities in the world, for being the centre, perhaps the source of Persian-Arabic civilisation. Only recently have they become accessible to western travellers. Robin Magowan gives a highly descriptive account, the first detailed portrait for many years of what life in these cities is like. Illustrated in colour by Soviet photographer Vladimir Gippenreiter - "Fabled Cities" is an evocation of the splendour and the savagery of the Central Asian tradition. Samarkand, the Rome of central Asia, is a monument to the genius of Timur (Tamerlane). Bukhara developed as a centre of pilgrimage and religious learning to become one of the great holy cities of Islam. This combination of violence and aesthetic refinement is epitomized in Khiva, which saw the last great flowering of Islamic culture in the 19th century. Beautifully designed and produced, "Fabled Cities" is the gift for armchair travellers.

  • Gather Out of Star-Dust: A Harlem Renaissance Album

    Gather Out of Star-Dust takes as its central premise that the Harlem Renaissance, known by its participants as the Negro Renaissance, relied heavily on "gatherings" of all kinds. Collaboration, friendship, partnership, and sponsorship were all central to the rise in prominence of African American publication, performance, and visual art. Most importantly, the act of collecting materials from this time subsequently enabled scholars to remember the movement. Gather Out of Star-Dust showcases fifty items from the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of African American Arts and Letters at Beinecke Library. Each of these objects--letters, journal entries, photographs, ephemera, artworks, and first editions--is accompanied by a mini-essay telling a piece of the story about this dynamic period. While numerous scholarly works have been written about this time of rebirth, this book returns us to the primary materials that have made that scholarship possible.

  • Silane Coupling Agents

    * It has been rumored that a bumble bee has such aerodynamic deficiencies that it should be incapable of flight. Fiberglass-reinforced polymer com- posites, similarly, have two (apparently) insurmountable obstacles to per- formance: 1) Water can hydrolyze any conceivable bond between organic and inorganic phase, and 2) Stresses across the interface during temperature cycling (resulting from a mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients) may exceed the strength of one of the phases. Organofunctional silanes are hybrid organic-inorganic compounds that are used as coupling agents across the organic-inorganic interface to help overcome these two obstacles to composite performance. One of their functions is to use the hydrolytic action of water under equilibrium condi- tions to relieve thermally induced stresses across the interface. If equilib- rium conditions can be maintained, the two problems act to cancel each other out. Coupling agents are defined primarily as materials that improve the practical adhesive bond of polymer to mineral. This may involve an increase in true adhesion, but it may also involve improved wetting, rheology, and other handling properties. The coupling agent may also modify the inter- phase region to strengthen the organic and inorganic boundary layers.

  • Quantum Mechanics of Fundamental Systems 1

    Il capitano generale lagrimo per allegrezza e nomino quel capo: Deseado, perehe l'avevamo gia gran tempo desiderato. Antonio Pigafetta Il Primo Viaggo in torno al Mondo I would like to take some poetic license in introducing this volume in a way that seems appropriate for a country, like Chile, that Iooks to the ocean. I believe it was Heisenberg who compared different times in physics with sailing a ship. He said that most of the time we keep our ships in port, or in the protection of a bay. But on a few occasions we go into the open sea, and those occasions are really the great times in theoretical physics, when everything can change. It does not seem totally unwarranted to hope that we are now entering one of those times. In that spirit, I would like to mention a wonderful book, which in English would be called something like Chile, Or a Crazy Geography.

  • A New American Sculpture, 1914 –1945: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach

    A New American Sculpture, 1914-1945 is the first publication to situate the individual contributions of Gaston Lachaise, Robert Laurent, Elie Nadelman, and William Zorach into a compelling constellation of artists with shared aesthetic and social concerns. Although each European-born, American artist cultivated his own distinct style, their creative priorities were all deeply rooted in quiet composition, synthetic approaches to anatomy, and architectural unity of curves and volume. At a time when abstract forms were popular, Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach were all ultimately in favor of maintaining the integrity of the human body to explore modernist styles. This handsome book underscores their unrelenting search for a novel American visual tradition at the intersection of modernism, historic visual culture, and contemporary popular imagery.

  • Classification of Finite Simple Groups: Groups on Non-Characteristic 2 Type: vol 1 (The University series in mathematics)

    Never before in the history of mathematics has there been an individual theorem whose proof has required 10,000 journal pages of closely reasoned argument. Who could read such a proof, let alone communicate it to others? But the classification of all finite simple groups is such a theorem-its complete proof, developed over a 30-year period by about 100 group theorists, is the union of some 500 journal articles covering approximately 10,000 printed pages. How then is one who has lived through it all to convey the richness and variety of this monumental achievement? Yet such an attempt must be made, for without the existence of a coherent exposition of the total proof, there is a very real danger that it will gradually become lost to the living world of mathematics, buried within the dusty pages of forgotten journals. For it is almost impossible for the uninitiated to find the way through the tangled proof without an experienced guide; even the 500 papers themselves require careful selection from among some 2,000 articles on simple group theory, which together include often attractive byways, but which serve only to delay the journey.

  • The Innovation Illusion: How So Little Is Created by So Many Working So Hard


    Financial Times Best Books of 2016: Business

    Timely, compelling, and certain to be controversial-a deeply researched study that reveals how companies and policy makers are hindering innovation-led growth Conventional wisdom holds that Western economies are on the threshold of fast-and-furious technological development. Fredrik Erixon and Bjorn Weigel refute this idea, bringing together a vast array of data and case studies to tell a very different story. With expertise spanning academia and the business world, Erixon and Weigel illustrate how innovation is being hampered by existing government regulations and corporate practices. Capitalism, they argue, has lost its mojo. Assessing the experiences of global companies, including Nokia, Uber, IBM, and Apple, the authors explore three key themes: declining economic dynamism in Western economies; growing corporate reluctance to contest markets and innovate; and excessive regulation limiting the diffusion of innovation. At a time of low growth, high unemployment, and increasing income inequality, innovation-led growth is more necessary than ever. This book unequivocally details the obstacles hindering our future prosperity.

  • The Guide to Franchising

    This fully revised fifth edition brings up to date its account of franchising and the changing area of commercial growth. It contains case studies and special sections on the legal aspects and international expansion.

  • Fundamentals of Magnetohydrodynamics

    A text for teachers and students in experimental physics and research engineering, introducing the ideas of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), showing the methods used in MHD, and preparing students for reading the original literature. Based on the mathematical study of simplified models. Annotation copyri

  • Le Gavroche Cookbook

    Classic French recipes from the leading London restaurant Le Gavroche, created and run by the Roux family for thirty years.

    The Roux family name is synonymous with quality French cooking; Michel Roux Jr selects 200 of the most popular classic recipes from the kitchen of Le Gavroche.

    Albert and Michel Roux have between them published many successful cookbooks; this is the first cookbook by Michel Roux Jr, who has worked with many of France's top chefs and as a personal chef to the President of France before taking over at Le Gavroche. The book shows how to create the atmosphere and cuisine of Le Gavroche at home, with advice on dining French style and on how to select what to drink, from aperitif to sweet wine.

  • Cassell Dictionary of English Grammar

    Over 1000 key grammatical concepts defined and described. Examples included throughout. Clearly written and easy to use. Paperback re-launch with new reference livery.

  • Stearn's Dictionary of Plant Names for Gardeners: A Handbook on the Origin and Meaning of the Botanical Names of Some Cultivated Plants

    More than 6000 botanical names, those most frequently encountered by gardeners and horticulturists, are included here, enlightened by a wealth of detail and information, the result of years of research by the author. Also listed are 3000 vernacular names, cross-indexed to their botanical name - an invaluable source for all garden writers and historians. Both the dictionary sections are prefaced by introductions.

  • Nonlinear Wave Processes in Excitable Media

    Proceedings of a NATO ARW held in Leeds, UK, September 11-15, 1989

  • Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice

    Published on the 500th anniversary of Tintoretto's birth, this unprecedented publication celebrates one of Renaissance Italy's greatest painters

    Jacopo Tintoretto (1518 or 1519-1594) was known for the remarkable energy of his work. His contemporary Giorgio Vasari described him as the "most extraordinary brain that painting has ever produced." Considered to be one of the three great painters of 16th-century Venice, along with Titian and Paolo Veronese, Tintoretto is admired for his dramatic treatments of sacred and secular narrative subjects and his insightful portraits of the Venetian aristocracy. His bold and expressive brushwork, which made his paintings seem unfinished to his contemporaries, is now recognized as a key step in the development of oil-on-canvas painting.

    This lavishly illustrated study, published to coincide with the 500th anniversary of the artist's birth, features more than forty of Tintoretto's paintings, including many large-scale pieces that convey the breadth and power of his narrative works, along with a sample of his finest drawings. An international group of scholars led by Robert Echols and Frederick Ilchman explores Tintoretto's artistic activity and situates his life and work in the context of his contemporaries' work and of the Renaissance in Italy, providing a fundamental point of reference for modern scholarship and an essential introduction to the artist's career and oeuvre.

  • Bid Better, Much Better After Opening 1 No-Trump: A New Approach

    Tackles one of the chief problem areas for bridge players
    Written by one of the world?s leading bridge teachers

  • Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved

    The contentious history of the idea of the black hole--the most fascinating and bizarre celestial object in the heavens

    For more than half a century, physicists and astronomers engaged in heated dispute over the possibility of black holes in the universe. The weirdly alien notion of a space-time abyss from which nothing escapes--not even light--seemed to confound all logic. This engrossing book tells the story of the fierce black hole debates and the contributions of Einstein and Hawking and other leading thinkers who completely altered our view of the universe.

    Renowned science writer Marcia Bartusiak shows how the black hole helped revive Einstein's greatest achievement, the general theory of relativity, after decades during which it had been pushed into the shadows. Not until astronomers discovered such surprising new phenomena as neutron stars and black holes did the once-sedate universe transform into an Einsteinian cosmos, filled with sources of titanic energy that can be understood only in the light of relativity. This book celebrates the hundredth anniversary of general relativity, uncovers how the black hole really got its name, and recounts the scientists' frustrating, exhilarating, and at times humorous battles over the acceptance of one of history's most dazzling ideas.

  • Humour

    A compelling guide to the fundamental place of humour and comedy within Western culture-by one of its greatest exponents

    Written by an acknowledged master of comedy, this study reflects on the nature of humour and the functions it serves. Why do we laugh? What are we to make of the sheer variety of laughter, from braying and cackling to sniggering and chortling? Is humour subversive, or can it defuse dissent? Can we define wit?

    Packed with illuminating ideas and a good many excellent jokes, the book critically examines various well-known theories of humour, including the idea that it springs from incongruity and the view that it reflects a mildly sadistic form of superiority to others. Drawing on a wide range of literary and philosophical sources, Terry Eagleton moves from Aristotle and Aquinas to Hobbes, Freud, and Bakhtin, looking in particular at the psychoanalytical mechanisms underlying humour and its social and political evolution over the centuries.

  • Prada: The Complete Collections

    A dazzling book that "makes the perfect coffee-table book for style-savvy bibliophiles"--Los Angeles Times

    Founded in 1913 as a leather-goods house in Milan, Prada entered the field of fashion when Miuccia Prada took the helm of the company in 1979. After initially focusing on accessories, she presented the house's first fashion collection in 1988, quickly transforming Prada into one of the world's most influential luxury brands. Her deeply personal, sophisticated, and subtly subversive approach often works against the cliches of beauty and sexy as she strives, in her own words, to be "more clever, or more difficult, or more complicated . . . or more new."

    Published in collaboration with Prada to celebrate 30 years of trend-setting creations, this stunning volume offers a comprehensive and definitive history of the house. Organized chronologically, each of Prada's collections is introduced by a description of its influences and highlights and is illustrated with stunning catwalk images of models such as Naomi Campbell, Kate Moss, and Gisele Bundchen showcasing clothing, accessories, and beauty looks. With a biographical profile of Miuccia Prada and an extensive reference section, this handsome and well-researched retrospective reflects the passion, craftsmanship, and creative spirit that define Prada.

  • The New Cosmic Story: Inside Our Awakening Universe

    A foremost thinker on science and religion argues that an adequate understanding of cosmic history requires attention to the emergence of interiority, including religious aspiration

    Over the past two centuries scientific advances have made it clear that the universe is a story still unfolding. In this thought-provoking book, John F. Haught considers the deeper implications of this discovery. He contends that many others who have written books on life and the universe--including Stephen Hawking, Stephen Jay Gould, and Richard Dawkins--have overlooked a crucial aspect of cosmic history: the drama of life's awakening to interiority and religious awareness. Science may illuminate the outside story of the universe, but a full telling of the cosmic story cannot ignore the inside development that interiority represents.

    Haught addresses two primary questions: what does the arrival of religion tell us about the universe, and what does our understanding of the cosmos as an unfinished drama tell us about religion? The history of religion may be ambiguous and sometimes even barbarous, he asserts, but its role in the story of cosmic emergence and awakening must be taken into account.

  • Applied Laser Spectroscopy

    This volume contains the lectures and seminars presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Applied Laser Spectroscopy" the fourteenth course of the Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics, held under the supervision of the Quantum Electronics Division of the European Physical Society. The Institute was held at Centro "I Cappuccini," San Miniato, Tuscany, Italy, September 3-15,1989. The Europhysics School of Quantum Electronics was started in 1970 with the aim of providing instruction for young researchers and advanced students already engaged in the area of quantum electronics or wishing to switch to this area from a different background. Presently the school is under the direction of Professors F.T. Arecchi and M Inguscio, University of Florence and Prof. H. Walther University of Munich and has the headquarters at the National Institute of Optics (INO), Firenze, Italy. Each time the directors choose a subject of particular interest, alternating fundamental topics with technological ones, and ask colleagues specifically competent in a given area to take the scientific responsibility for that course.

  • Brazil - The Troubled Rise of a Global Power

    A knowledgeable appreciation of a complex, vital South American giant, destined to be one of the world's premier economic powers

    Experts believe that Brazil, the world's fifth largest country and its seventh largest economy, will be one of the most important global powers by the year 2030. Yet far more attention has been paid to the other rising behemoths Russia, India, and China. Often ignored and underappreciated, Brazil, according to renowned, award-winning journalist Michael Reid, has finally begun to live up to its potential, but faces important challenges before it becomes a nation of substantial global significance.

    After decades of military rule, the fourth most populous democracy enjoyed effective reformist leadership that tamed inflation, opened the country up to trade, and addressed poverty and other social issues, enabling Brazil to become more of an essential participant in global affairs. But as it prepares to host the 2014 soccer World Cup and 2016 Olympics, Brazil has been rocked by mass protest. This insightful volume considers the nation's still abundant problems--an inefficient state, widespread corruption, dysfunctional politics, and violent crime in its cities--alongside its achievements to provide a fully rounded portrait of a vibrant country about to take a commanding position on the world stage.

  • The Letters of Cole Porter

    The first comprehensive collection of the letters of one of the most successful American songwriters of the twentieth century

    From Anything Goes to Kiss Me, Kate, Cole Porter left a lasting legacy of iconic songs including 'You're the Top,' 'Love For Sale,' and 'Night and Day.' Yet, alongside his professional success, Porter led an eclectic personal life which featured exuberant parties, scandalous affairs, and chronic health problems. This extensive collection of letters (most of which are published here for the first time) dates from the first decade of the twentieth century to the early 1960s and features correspondence with stars such as Irving Berlin, Ethel Merman, and Orson Welles, as well as his friends and lovers.

    Cliff Eisen and Dominic McHugh complement these letters with lively commentaries that draw together the loose threads of Porter's life and highlight the distinctions between Porter's public and private existence. This book reveals surprising insights into his attitudes toward Hollywood and Broadway, and toward money, love, and dazzling success.

  • The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C.

    The Berlin Painter was the name given by British classicist and art historian Sir John Beazley to an otherwise anonymous Athenian red-figure vase-painter. The artist's long career extended from about 505 B.C. well into the 460s, and his elegant renderings of daily life and mythological stories offer invaluable insight into the social, political, religious, and artistic workings of early 5th-century Athens.

    Since the first published identification of the artist in 1911, the Berlin Painter's oeuvre has grown to some 330 works, both complete pots and fragments, making him one of the best-known artists of his kind. This lavishly illustrated publication features nine essays by leading scholars who explore the artist's work, milieu, influence, and legacy, as well as the role of connoisseurship in art-historical scholarship. With an updated catalogue raisonne that includes many newly attributed works, it is the definitive book on this seminal artist.

  • Mark Rothko: Toward the Light in the Chapel

    A fascinating exploration of the life and work of one of America's most famous and enigmatic postwar visual artists

    Mark Rothko, one of the greatest painters of the twentieth century, was born in the Jewish Pale of Settlement in 1903. He immigrated to the United States at age ten, taking with him his Talmudic education and his memories of pogroms and persecutions in Russia. His integration into American society began with a series of painful experiences, especially as a student at Yale, where he felt marginalized for his origins and ultimately left the school. The decision to become an artist led him to a new phase in his life. Early in his career, Annie Cohen-Solal writes, "he became a major player in the social struggle of American artists, and his own metamorphosis benefited from the unique transformation of the U.S. art world during this time." Within a few decades, he had forged his definitive artistic signature, and most critics hailed him as a pioneer. The numerous museum shows that followed in major U.S. and European institutions ensured his celebrity. But this was not enough for Rothko, who continued to innovate. Ever faithful to his habit of confronting the establishment, he devoted the last decade of his life to cultivating his new conception of art as an experience, thanks to the commission of a radical project, the Rothko Chapel in Houston, Texas.

    Cohen-Solal's fascinating biography, based on considerable archival research, tells the unlikely story of how a young immigrant from Dvinsk became a crucial transforming agent of the art world--one whose legacy prevails to this day.

  • Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry

    This volume of Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry contains six chapters. The first four chapters are about phenomena of interest at the microscopic level and the last two are on phenomena at the macroscopic level. In the first chapter, Uosaki and Kita review various theoretical models that have been presented to describe the phenomena that occur at an electrolyte/ semiconductor interface under illumination. In the second chapter, Orazem and Newman discuss the same phenomena from a different point of view. In Chapter 3, Bogus- lavsky presents state-of-the-art considerations of transmembrane potentials and other aspects of active transport in biological systems. Next, Burke and Lyons present a survey of both the theoretical and the experimental work that has been done on hydrous oxide films on several metals. The last two chapters cover the topics of the production of chlorine and caustic and the phenomena of electrolytic gas evol- ution. In Chapter 5, Hine et al. describe the engineering aspects of the three processes used in the chi or-alkali industry, and in Chapter 6, Sides reviews the macroscopic phenomena of nucleation, growth, and detachment of bubbles, and the effect of bubbles on the conduc- tivity of and mass transfer in electrolytes.

  • Artisanal Enlightenment: Science and the Mechanical Arts in Old Regime France

    A groundbreaking work that places the mechanical arts and the world of making at the heart of the Enlightenment

    What would the Enlightenment look like from the perspective of artistes, the learned artisans with esprit, who presented themselves in contrast to philosophers, savants, and routine-bound craftsmen? Making a radical change of historical protagonists, Paola Bertucci places the mechanical arts and the world of making at the heart of the Enlightenment. At a time of great colonial, commercial, and imperial concerns, artistes planned encyclopedic projects and sought an official role in the administration of the French state. The Societe des Arts, which they envisioned as a state institution that would foster France's colonial and economic expansion, was the most ambitious expression of their collective aspirations.

    Artisanal Enlightenment provides the first in-depth study of the Societe, and demonstrates its legacy in scientific programs, academies, and the making of Diderot and D'Alembert's Encyclopedie. Through insightful analysis of textual, visual, and material sources, Bertucci provides a groundbreaking perspective on the politics of writing on the mechanical arts and the development of key Enlightenment concepts such as improvement, utility, and progress.

  • The Voynich Manuscript

    The first authorized copy of this mysterious, much-speculated-upon, one-of-a-kind, centuries-old puzzle. The Voynich Manuscript is produced from new photographs of the entire original and accompanied by expert essays that invite anyone to understand and explore the enigma.

    Many call the fifteenth-century codex, commonly known as the "Voynich Manuscript," the world's most mysterious book. Written in an unknown script by an unknown author, the manuscript has no clearer purpose now than when it was rediscovered in 1912 by rare books dealer Wilfrid Voynich. The manuscript appears and disappears throughout history, from the library of the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II to a secret sale of books in 1903 by the Society of Jesus in Rome. The book's language has eluded decipherment, and its elaborate illustrations remain as baffling as they are beautiful. For the first time, this facsimile, complete with elaborate folding sections, allows readers to explore this enigma in all its stunning detail, from its one-of-a-kind "Voynichese" text to its illustrations of otherworldly plants, unfamiliar constellations, and naked women swimming though fantastical tubes and green baths.

    The essays that accompany the manuscript explain what we have learned about this work--from alchemical, cryptographic, forensic, and historical perspectives--but they provide few definitive answers. Instead, as New York Times best-selling author Deborah Harkness says in her introduction, the book "invites the reader to join us at the heart of the mystery."

  • Acol Bridge Made Easy

    More and more people are finding out what a great joy it is to be able to play bridge. You can learn at any age, but one thing is sure - you will wish you had started earlier.

    Bridge is the most stimulating, most intriguing, most fascinating and most challenging of all card games. It will give you more lasting pleasure than any other recreation because of its unending variety.

    Once you start playing, you will want to play again and again...

  • The Painted House

    Designed as a pattern book for professionals and a source of ideas for home decorators, this illustrated volume shows the murals and ceiling paintings of Graham Rust, one of Britain's leading practitioners.

  • Hitler's Soldiers: The German Army in the Third Reich

    A penetrating study of the German army's military campaigns, relations with the Nazi regime, and complicity in Nazi crimes across occupied Europe

    For decades after 1945, it was generally believed that the German army, professional and morally decent, had largely stood apart from the SS, Gestapo, and other corps of the Nazi machine. Ben Shepherd draws on a wealth of primary sources and recent scholarship to convey a much darker, more complex picture. For the first time, the German army is examined throughout the Second World War, across all combat theaters and occupied regions, and from multiple perspectives: its battle performance, social composition, relationship with the Nazi state, and involvement in war crimes and military occupation.

    This was a true people's army, drawn from across German society and reflecting that society as it existed under the Nazis. Without the army and its conquests abroad, Shepherd explains, the Nazi regime could not have perpetrated its crimes against Jews, prisoners of war, and civilians in occupied countries. The author examines how the army was complicit in these crimes and why some soldiers, units, and higher commands were more complicit than others. Shepherd also reveals the reasons for the army's early battlefield successes and its mounting defeats up to 1945, the latter due not only to Allied superiority and Hitler's mismanagement as commander-in-chief, but also to the failings--moral, political, economic, strategic, and operational--of the army's own leadership.

  • Revolutionary Horizons: Art and Polemics in 1950s Cuba

    Modernism in Havana reached its climax during the turbulent years of the 1950s as a generation of artists took up abstraction as a means to advance artistic and political goals in the name of Cuba Libre. During a decade of insurrection and, ultimately, revolution, abstract art signaled the country's cultural worldliness and its purchase within the international avant-garde. This pioneering book offers the first in-depth examination of Cuban art during that time, following the intersecting trajectories of the artist groups Los Once and Los Diez against a dramatic backdrop of modernization and armed rebellion. Abigail McEwen explores the activities of a constellation of artists and writers invested in the ideological promises of abstraction, and reflects on art's capacity to effect radical social change. Featuring previously unpublished artworks, new archival research, and extensive primary sources, this remarkable volume excavates a rich cultural history with links to the development of abstraction in Europe and the Americas.






  • Revolution Against Empire: Taxes, Politics, and the Origins of American Independence

    A bold transatlantic history of American independence revealing that 1776 was about far more than taxation without representation

    Revolution Against Empire sets the story of American independence within a long and fierce clash over the political and economic future of the British Empire. Justin du Rivage traces this decades-long debate, which pitted neighbors and countrymen against one another, from the War of Austrian Succession to the end of the American Revolution.

    As people from Boston to Bengal grappled with the growing burdens of imperial rivalry and fantastically expensive warfare, some argued that austerity and new colonial revenue were urgently needed to rescue Britain from unsustainable taxes and debts. Others insisted that Britain ought to treat its colonies as relative equals and promote their prosperity. Drawing from archival research in the United States, Britain, and France, this book shows how disputes over taxation, public debt, and inequality sparked the American Revolution--and reshaped the British Empire.

  • The Physics of Submicron Lithography

    This book is devoted to the physics of electron-beam, ion-beam, optical, and x-ray lithography. The need for this book results from the following considerations. The astonishing achievements in microelectronics are in large part connected with successfully applying the relatively new technology of processing (changing the prop- erties of) a material into a device whose component dimensions are submicron, called photolithography. In this method the device is imaged as a pattern on a metal film that has been deposited onto a transparent substrate and by means of a broad stream of light is transferred to a semiconductor wafer within which the physical structure of the devices and the integrated circuit connections are formed layer by layer. The smallest dimensions of the device components are limited by the diffraction of the light when the pattern is transferred and are approximately the same as the wavelength of the light. Photolithography by light having a wavelength of A 0.4 flm has made it possible to serially produce integrated circuits having devices whose minimal size is 2-3 flm in the 4 pattern and having 10-105 transistors per circuit.

  • Introduction to Communication Science and Systems

    There are many valuable and useful books on electrical communication (References 1-5 are some examples), but they have certain disadvantages for the beginner. The more advanced books present some things in a basic way, but they are very narrow for an introduction to communica- tion. The introductory books are broader but still narrow by our stan- dards. Further, they often pick things out of thin air rather than derive them. This book is aimed at giving the beginner a basic understanding of a wide range of topics which are essential in communication systems. These include antennas and transmission, thermal noise and its consequences, Fourier transforms, modulation and noise, sampling and pulse code modulation, autocorrelation and power spectrum, optimum filtering, gauss- ian noise and errors in digital transmission, data transmission, limits on data rate including information theory and quantum limits, and source encoding. We have not included communications traffic, switching, and multiplexing, nor protocols for digital and computer communications. For these, Reference 6 is excellent. In general, our book does not discuss the circuits used for communication or the physics of radio propagation. We assume that these will be taught in specialized courses, but such courses are not prerequisites for this one. Chapter 1 introduces the transmission formula or antenna equation and antenna directivity. Only a very basic sophomore physics knowledge of electromagnetic theory is assumed. The radar equation is also treated.

  • The Pre-Raphaelites and Science

    This revelatory book traces how the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and their close associates put scientific principles into practice across their painting, poetry, sculpture, and architecture. In their manifesto, The Germ, the Pre-Raphaelites committed themselves to creating a new kind of art modeled on science, in which precise observation could lead to discoveries about nature and humanity. In Oxford and London, Victorian scientists and Pre-Raphaelite artists worked together to design and decorate natural history museums as temples to God's creation. At the same time, journals like Nature and the Fortnightly Review combined natural science with Pre-Raphaelite art theory and poetry to find meaning and coherence within a worldview turned upside down by Darwin's theory of evolution. Offering reinterpretations of well-known works by John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Ford Madox Brown, and William Morris, this major revaluation of the popular Victorian movement also considers less-familiar artists who were no less central to the Pre-Raphaelite project. These include William Michael Rossetti, Walter Deverell, James Collinson, John and Rosa Brett, John Lucas Tupper, and the O'Shea brothers, along with the architects Benjamin Woodward and Alfred Waterhouse.

  • Mathematics for Human Flourishing

    An inclusive vision of mathematics--its beauty, its humanity, and its power to build virtues that help us all flourish

    For mathematician Francis Su, a society without mathematical affection is like a city without concerts, parks, or museums. To miss out on mathematics is to live without experiencing some of humanity's most beautiful ideas.

    In this profound book, written for a wide audience but especially for those disenchanted by their past experiences, an award-winning mathematician and educator weaves parables, puzzles, and personal reflections to show how mathematics meets basic human desires--such as for play, beauty, freedom, justice, and love--and cultivates virtues essential for human flourishing. These desires and virtues, and the stories told here, reveal how mathematics is intimately tied to being human. Some lessons emerge from those who have struggled, including philosopher Simone Weil, whose own mathematical contributions were overshadowed by her brother's, and Christopher Jackson, who discovered mathematics as an inmate in a federal prison. Christopher's letters to the author appear throughout the book and show how this intellectual pursuit can--and must--be open to all.

  • John Galliano: Unseen

    A striking, sumptuous portfolio of catwalk and behind-the-scene images of John Galliano's highly creative collections for his eponymous label

    John Galliano's (b. 1960) ascent in the world of fashion design was swift and filled with acclaim for his bold, quick-witted sensibility and his theatrical flair. He became head designer for Givenchy in 1995, and then for Christian Dior in 1996, and directed his own fashion label between 1996 and 2011. He was named Designer of the Year at the British Fashion Awards four times. Currently creative director of the Paris-based fashion house Maison Margiela, Galliano has fascinated the fashion world with his often outrageous and whimsical creations, including some of the most memorable collections of the 20th century: from the iconic Suzie Sphinx collection to luxurious and edgy reinventions of Chinese, Peruvian, Yemeni, or Mongolian costumes.

    Unfolding chronologically with short texts by fashion expert Claire Wilcox introducing each collection, John Galliano: Unseen captures the designer's mesmerizing creations for his eponymous label (including rich and idiosyncratic details) and the intense backstage work of Galliano's trusted collaborators. Robert Fairer's long stint as backstage photographer for Vogue gives him a unique perspective, and his exquisite photographs of Galliano's collections, many of which are published here for the first time, offer insights into the extravagance and playfulness of one of the world's most flamboyant, innovative, and controversial fashion designers at the zenith of his career.

  • Inadvertent

    The second book in the Why I Write series provides generous insight into the creative process of the award-winning Norwegian novelist Karl Ove Knausgaard

    "Why I Write" may prove to be the most difficult question Karl Ove Knausgaard has struggled to answer yet it is central to the project of one of the most influential writers working today. To write, for the Norwegian artist, is to resist easy thinking and preconceived notions that inhibit awareness of our lives. Knausgaard writes to "erode [his] own notions about the world. . . . It is one thing to know something, another to write about it." The key to enhanced living is the ability to hit upon something inadvertently, to regard it from a position of defenselessness and unknowing. A deeply personal meditation, Inadvertent is a cogent and accessible guide to the creative process of one of our most prolific and ingenious artists.

  • Basic Acol Bridge Flipper

    This Fast Fact Finder is a guide and summary to the basics of bridge for the beginner and novice player, enabling players to check quickly important points in bidding and play. It is designed to be used in conjunction with Basic Bridge and Acol Bridge Made Easy, both by Ron Klinger.

    Other Fast Fact Finders: Acol Bridge Flipper, Duplicate Bridge Flipper, Memory-Aids and Useful Rules Flipper, Modern Losing Trick Count Flipper and Opening Leads Flipper.

  • Strange Bird: The Albatross Press and the Third Reich

    The first book about the Albatross Press, a Penguin precursor that entered into an uneasy relationship with the Nazi regime to keep Anglo-American literature alive under fascism

    The Albatross Press was, from its beginnings in 1932, a "strange bird" a cultural outsider to the Third Reich but an economic insider. It was funded by British-Jewish interests. Its director was rumored to work for British intelligence. A precursor to Penguin, it distributed both middlebrow fiction and works by edgier modernist authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway to eager continental readers. Yet Albatross printed and sold its paperbacks in English from the heart of Hitler's Reich.

    In her original and skillfully researched history, Michele K. Troy reveals how the Nazi regime tolerated Albatross--for both economic and propaganda gains--and how Albatross exploited its insider position to keep Anglo-American books alive under fascism. In so doing, Troy exposes the contradictions in Nazi censorship while offering an engaging detective story, a history, a nuanced analysis of men and motives, and a cautionary tale.

  • Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions

    BBC RADIO 4 BOOK OF THE WEEK

    A best-selling author and world-renowned bibliophile meditates on his vast personal library and champions the vital role of all libraries.

    In June 2015 Alberto Manguel prepared to leave his centuries-old village home in France's Loire Valley and reestablish himself in a one-bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Packing up his enormous, 35,000-volume personal library, choosing which books to keep, store, or cast out, Manguel found himself in deep reverie on the nature of relationships between books and readers, books and collectors, order and disorder, memory and reading. In this poignant and personal reevaluation of his life as a reader, the author illuminates the highly personal art of reading and affirms the vital role of public libraries.

    Manguel's musings range widely, from delightful reflections on the idiosyncrasies of book lovers to deeper analyses of historic and catastrophic book events, including the burning of ancient Alexandria's library and contemporary library lootings at the hands of ISIS. With insight and passion, the author underscores the universal centrality of books and their unique importance to a democratic, civilized, and engaged society.

  • Monet: The Early Years

    The first comprehensive examination of the painter's formative years, tracing the evolution of Monet's early style and personal ambitions that drove the rest of his career

    This elegant volume is the first to be devoted to the young genius of Claude Monet (1840-1926). Bringing together the greatest paintings from his early career--including his first Salon-exhibited work, the Kimbell Art Museum's La Pointe de la Heve at Low Tide; Dejeuner sur l'Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass) and The Magpie from the Musee d'Orsay; and The Green Wave and La Grenouillere from the Metropolitan Museum of Art--it features essays by distinguished scholars, focusing on the evolution of Monet's own distinctive mode of painting. Through the 1860s, the young painter absorbed and transformed a variety of influences, from the lessons of the Barbizon school and his mentor Boudin to the challenges posed by his friends Manet, Pissarro, Renoir, and Sisley. Artistic innovation and personal ambition shaped the work of the celebrated impressionist painter from the very start of his long and illustrious career.

  • Brewer's Famous Quotations

    The only quotation book that tells the stories behind the quotations has been expanded and updated. Now, readers can find important information other references neglect: the colorful anecdotes and historical incidents that provide the context, background, and wider significance of each famous saying. Did Neil Armstrong revise his famous "giant leap" quotation after he got back from the moon? Did the aeronautical engineer who coined Murphy's Law ("if anything can go wrong, it will") actually mean it as a warning about safe design? Here's the inside story on 5,000 great quotations, from ancient times to the novels of Douglas Adams.

  • Key Facts in Gastroenterology

    This book is an extraordinary achievement by Jonathan Halevy. To condense the material of three major gastrointestinal textbooks would be triumph enough, but to add a distillate of the contents of ten journals, from 1980 to 1985, requires Herculean vigor. To reorganize all the material under headings which extract concise "facts" from wheat and chaff requires a passionate interest in pa- tients together with an understanding of physiology. Fortunately, Jonathan Halevy has just the right combination of clinical and lab- oratory interest for him to select the details of what is important. Such compulsive dedication has now made it possible for the prac- ticing phYSician, gastroenterologist, or house officer, interested in preparing for board examinations or simply browsing in the field, to have at his fingertips a series of definitions and to put in his pocket the key facts for diagnosis and therapy. Of course, facts by themselves are something of which to be a little wary. Scientists first, doctors regard facts the way farmers look at sheep-to be sheared for their utility. Medicine too often is only a fact-gathering occupation (some lectures send me to wool- gathering), in which having the facts sometimes clouds clinical judgment about what is important for the individual patient. - vii viii FOREWORD tionalism and romanticism lie at the two poles of medical practice, but rationalism rules in the 1980s.

  • Beaten By The Masters

    David Bird, known world-wide for his tales of the bridge-crazy monks of St Titus, moves to a hilarious new setting. Bridge is a compulsory subject at Cholmeley school and a host of vibrant characters participate in the action. Madame Baguette, the Senior French mistress, chases any master whose hair is still where it should be. They, meanwhile, turn a roving eye towards Yvonne Guitton, the junior French mistress. And woe betide any unhappy boy (or member of staff) who finds himself partnering the irascible Headmaster.

    As with all David Bird's books, it is not just a matter of the readers being convulsed with laughter. The bridge is as brilliant as ever, and by the time the final episode is reached, much sound bridge instruction has been painlessly absorbed. Which is more than can be said for those poor unfortunates caught playing a torch-lit rubber after lights-out.

  • From Christ to Confucius: German Missionaries, Chinese Christians, and the Globalization of Christianity, 1860-1950

    A bold and original study of German missionaries in China, who catalyzed a revolution in thinking among European Christians about the nature of Christianity itself

    In this accessibly written and empirically based study, Albert Wu documents how German missionaries--chastened by their failure to convert Chinese people to Christianity--reconsidered their attitudes toward Chinese culture and Confucianism. In time, their increased openness catalyzed a revolution in thinking among European Christians about the nature of Christianity itself. At a moment when Europe's Christian population is falling behind those of South America and Africa, Wu's provocative analysis sheds light on the roots of Christianity's global shift.

  • Principles of Catalyst Development

    Successful industrial heterogeneous catalysts fulfill several key require- ments: in addition to high catalytic activity for the desired reaction, with high selectivity where appropriate, they also have an acceptable commercial life and are rugged enough for transportation and charging into plant reactors. Additional requirements include the need to come online smoothly in a short time and reproducible manufacturing procedures that involve convenient processes at acceptable cost. The development of heterogeneous catalysts that meet these (often mutually exclusive) demands is far from straightforward, and in addition much of the actual manufacturing tech- nology is kept secret for commercial reasons-thus there is no modern text that deals with the whole of this important subject. Principles of Catalyst Development, which deals comprehensively with the design, development, and manufacture of practical heterogeneous catalysts, is therefore especially valuable in meeting the long-standing needs of both industrialists and academics. As one who has worked extensively on a variety of catalyst development problems in both industry and academia, James T. Richardson is well placed to write an authoritative book covering both the theory and the practice of catalyst development. Much of the material contained in this book had its origin in a series of widely acclaimed lectures, attended mainly by industrial researchers, given over many years in the United States and Europe. All those in industry who work with catalysts, both beginners and those of considerable experience, should find this volume an essential guide.

  • The Abbot's Great Sacrifice

    In this eighth collection of stories featuring the bridge-crazy monks of St Titus, the pompous and self-important Abbot suffers more than his fair share of the game's aggravations. The world's worst house guest, Brother Herman from Australia, pays the monastery a visit. A team of attractive girls arrives at St Titus, playing unexpectedly well and unsettling the monastery novices. A disastrous start sends the Abbot to the bottom row of Swiss Teams, where he receives unwelcome advice from Josie Threlfall, a local teacher of the game.

  • Think of Them As Spaces: Brice Marden's Drawings

    An exploration of Brice Marden's draftsmanship and the catalytic role the medium of drawing plays in his larger oeuvre

    In 1979, Brice Marden (b. 1938) asked that his drawings be thought of "as spaces," reflecting the idea that drawing is a medium that is much more than its two physical dimensions. Looking closely at six series of drawings that span nearly the entirety of Marden's ongoing career, this luxuriously illustrated presentation features works spanning from 1975 to 2019, including the never-before-published Letters from Borobudur of 2010. In addition to rarely seen early monochrome works, three groups of 1979-80s drawings--Mirabelle Addenda, Shell, and Cold Mountain Studies--foreshadow the artist's mature linear work and highlight the process of invention and permutation that occurs as Marden thinks and draws on paper. A concise overview of Marden's drawing practice investigates the geographies and methods that inform his work, while an artist interview offers insight into how Marden uses the medium as a means of exploring the creation of spaces on drawing surfaces.

  • Enigma: The Battle For The Code

    The complete story of how the German Enigma codes were broken. Perfect for fans of THE IMITATION GAME, the new film on Alan Turing's Enigma code, starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

    Breaking the German Enigma codes was not only about brilliant mathematicians and professors at Bletchley Park. There is another aspect of the story which it is only now possible to tell. It takes in the exploits of spies, naval officers and ordinary British seamen who risked, and in some cases lost, their lives snatching the vital Enigma codebooks from under the noses of Nazi officials and from sinking German ships and submarines.

    This book tells the whole Enigma story: its original invention and use by German forces and how it was the Poles who first cracked - and passed on to the British - the key to the German airforce Enigma. The more complicated German Navy Enigma appeared to them to be unbreakable.

  • Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

    An insightful, engaging tour by a noted Silicon Valley insider of how accelerating developments in Artificial Intelligence will transform the way we live and work

    Selected as one of the 10 best science and technology books of 2015 by The Economist

    After billions of dollars and fifty years of effort, researchers are finally cracking the code on artificial intelligence. As society stands on the cusp of unprecedented change, Jerry Kaplan unpacks the latest advances in robotics, machine learning, and perception powering systems that rival or exceed human capabilities. Driverless cars, robotic helpers, and intelligent agents that promote our interests have the potential to usher in a new age of affluence and leisure -- but as Kaplan warns, the transition may be protracted and brutal unless we address the two great scourges of the modern developed world: volatile labor markets and income inequality. He proposes innovative, free-market adjustments to our economic system and social policies to avoid an extended period of social turmoil. His timely and accessible analysis of the promise and perils of artificial intelligence is a must-read for business leaders and policy makers on both sides of the aisle.

  • Inspired Cardplay

    If you ever sit by the elbow of a famous player, you will be surprised by many of the plays. What is going on in the great player's mind? In this exciting new book by Britain's top bridge writer, David Bird, and the world-renowned professional player, Martin Hoffman, you will find out!

    Twelve important areas of cardplay have been chosen, involving both declarer play and defence. For those not in the know, the various plays appear to be inspired. They are in fact the result of cold hard logic. Learn the correct thought processes yourself and - whatever you aspirations may be - your cardplay will improve significantly.

  • Structure and Development of Greenland-Scotland Ridge: New Methods and Concepts

    A group of geoscientists from a number of NATO countries met under NATO sponsorship in Copenhagen on February 27 and 28, 1978, and formulated a proposal entitled "EVOLUTION OF THE GREENLAND- ICELAND-FAEROE-SCOTLAND RIDGE, A KEY AREA IN MARINE GEOSCIENCE". This part of the North Atlantic Ocean is of particular interest because of its anomalously shallow bathymetry which has profoundly influenced many aspects of the evolution of the North Atlantic. The proposed investigations therefore aim to study the deep crustal structure including relationship of continental and oceanic crust, history of subsidence of the ridge including its past role as a land bridge, age of the oceanic basement along it and its history of formation, and the influence of the ridge on Tertiary and Quaternary depositional palaeoenvironments. In furtherance of this proposal, it is intended to carry out a series of seismic and drilling operations on the Ridge during the coming years. These major marine investigations will be mainly funded from national sources. An important preliminary stage to the project is the collec- tion and synthesis of available data. NATO has already approved a small budget for this purpose which has enabled a geoscientist to work partly at the Department of Geological Sciences of Durham University, UK, and partly at Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, USA, for about six months to compile the data. The most important map showing magnetic anomalies and lineations in the area, is included in a pocket at the back of this volume.

  • Informative Writing: Your Practical Guide to Effective Communication

    The second edition of a practical text that aims to turn the ordinary writer into an effective communicator. It includes tips on how to write documents, essays, papers, presentations and letters to achieve the maximum effect.

  • Derbyshire

    This is the essential guide to the architecture of Pevsner's "county of contrasts," home to an amazingly diverse assortment of landmarks. Among Derbyshire's many distinguished country houses are Haddon Hall and Hardwick Hall. 17th-century highlights include the adventurous architecture of Bolsover Castle and the Baroque splendors of Chatsworth, while the dazzling Neoclassical interiors of Kedleston Hall are the summit of the county's many Georgian achievements. Numerous spa towns, pioneering industrial settlements, and parish churches from Anglo-Saxon to modern are also included. The settings range from the Trent valley to the sublime landscape of the Peak District, making Derbyshire one of England's most visually arresting counties.

  • The Elements of Power: Gadgets, Guns, and the Struggle for a Sustainable Future in the Rare Metal Age

    A natural resource strategist investigates the growing global demand for rare metals and what it means to the environment and our future

    Our future hinges on a set of elements that few of us have even heard of. In this surprising and revealing book, David S. Abraham unveils what rare metals are and why our electronic gadgets, the most powerful armies, and indeed the fate of our planet depend on them. These metals have become the building blocks of modern society; their properties are now essential for nearly all our electronic, military, and "green" technologies. But their growing use is not without environmental, economic, and geopolitical consequences.

    Abraham traces these elements' hidden paths from mines to our living rooms, from the remote hills of China to the frozen Gulf of Finland, providing vivid accounts of those who produce, trade, and rely on rare metals. He argues that these materials are increasingly playing a significant role in global affairs, conferring strength to countries and companies that can ensure sustainable supplies.

    Just as oil, iron, and bronze revolutionized previous eras, so too will these metals. The challenges this book reveals, and the plans it proposes, make it essential reading for our rare metal age.

  • Yves Saint Laurent: The Complete Haute Couture Collections, 1962–2002

    A spectacular visual journey through 40 years of haute couture from one of the best-known and most trend-setting brands in fashion

    Founded in 1962 by Yves Saint Laurent and his partner, Pierre Berge, the fashion house Yves Saint Laurent has for more than half a century been synonymous with excellence in modern and iconic style. From Yves Saint Laurent's revolutionary and enduringly popular tuxedo suit for women, le smoking, to iconic art-inspired creations, from Mondrian dresses to precious Van Gogh embroidery and the famous Ballets Russes collection, the house's haute couture line has been hugely influential in changing the way modern women dress. This definitive publication opens with a concise history of the house before exploring the collections themselves, organized chronologically and ending in 2002, the year that Yves Saint Laurent retired from the company he started.

    Each collection is introduced by a short text elucidating its influences and highlights and is illustrated with carefully curated catwalk images, each season styled as the designer intended and worn by the world's top models. The book showcases hundreds of spectacular clothes, details, accessories, beauty looks, and set designs.

  • Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole's Trans-Atlantic Inheritance

    Landscape art in the early 19th century was guided by two rival concepts: the picturesque, which emphasized touristic pleasures and visual delight, and the sublime, an aesthetic category rooted in notions of fear and danger. British artists including J.M.W. Turner and John Constable raised landscape painting to new heights and their work reached global audiences through the circulation of engravings. Thomas Cole, born in England, emigrated to the United States in 1818, and first absorbed the picturesque and sublime through print media. Cole transformed British and continental European traditions to create a distinctive American form of landscape painting. The authors here explore the role of prints as agents of artistic transmission and look closely at how Cole's own creative process was driven by works on paper such as drawings, notebooks, letters, and manuscripts. Also considered is the importance of the parallel works of William Guy Wall, best known for his pioneering Hudson River Portfolio. Beautifully illustrated with works on paper ranging from watercolors to etchings, mezzotints, aquatints, engravings, and lithographs, as well as notable paintings, this book offers important insights into Cole's formulation of a profound new category in art--the American sublime.

  • Cassell Concise Dictionary

    This updated edition of a standard reference work offers an expanded text, with a range of new slang and technical terms, notes on grammar, and help with common mistakes and mispronunciations. The dictionary also has a misspelling guide to help locate tricky spellings.;All existing definitions have been updated where necessary in the dictionary, there is coverage of the latest words and expressions, and archaic forms and meanings are also included. Irregular and variant forms of words are recorded, and American and Australian English is covered. Notes on English usage and grammar are included throughout.

  • Jenny Kee's Needlepoint Designs

    Provides designs, charts and technical guidance for the needlepoint interpretations of Jenny Kee's bright designs. The 20 projects include cushions, a director's chair, pictures, picture frames, table mat, tote bag and foot stool.

  • Fashion in Steel: The Landsknecht Armour of Wilhelm Von Rogendorf

    A gloriously illustrated volume that looks at the remarkable armor of a key Habsburg commander and its relationship to contemporary Renaissance fashion

    This sumptuously illustrated book celebrates a curious masterpiece of German Renaissance art--the Landsknecht armor of Wilhelm von Rogendorf (1523). Recently conserved to its original glory, this magnificent suit of armor, made for a trusted courtier, diplomat, and commander of infantry units for the Habsburgs, deceives the eye: the steel sleeves drape in graceful folds, with cuts in the surface, suggesting the armor is made from cloth rather than metal. The author of this fascinating volume explores the question: why does the armor look this way?

    Stefan Krause delves back five centuries to the political, social, and cultural context in which von Rogendorf lived. Among other key venues in the Holy Roman Empire, this story takes the reader to the court of Emperor Charles V in Spain and to Augsburg, the leading center of armor making, where Rogendorf was introduced to the court armorer of Charles V, Kolman Helmschmid (1471-1532). Helmschmid was famous for his inventive and masterfully sculptured works, and this book elaborates on his unique contributions to the history of armor, and how and why von Rogendorf's suit was informed by contemporary fashion.

  • Advances in Human Genetics

    The latest volume in this respected series considers chromosome instability and overgrowth syndromes, lacticacidemia, the molecular basis of HLA disease association, and the genetics of growth hormone and its disorders. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

  • Germany and the Ottoman Railways: Art, Empire, and Infrastructure

    The complex political and cultural relationship between the German state and the Ottoman Empire is explored through the lens of the Ottoman Railway network, its architecture, and material culture

    With lines extending from Bosnia to Baghdad to Medina, the Ottoman Railway Network (1868-1919) was the pride of the empire and its ultimate emblem of modernization--yet it was largely designed and bankrolled by German corporations. This exemplifies a uniquely ambiguous colonial condition in which the interests of Germany and the Ottoman Empire were in constant flux. German capitalists and cultural figures sought influence in the Near East, including access to archaeological sites such as Tell Halaf and Mshatta. At the same time, Ottoman leaders and laborers urgently pursued imperial consolidation. Germany and the Ottoman Railways explores the impact of these political agendas as well as the railways' impact on the built environment. Relying on a trove of previously unpublished archival materials, including maps, plans, watercolors, and photographs, author Peter H. Christensen also reveals the significance of this major infrastructure project for the budding disciplines of geography, topography, art history, and archaeology.

  • The Exile's Song: Edmond Dédé and the Unfinished Revolutions of the Atlantic World

    The extraordinary story of African American composer Edmond Dede, raised in antebellum New Orleans, and his remarkable career in France

    In 1855, Edmond Dede, a free black composer from New Orleans, emigrated to Paris. There he trained with France's best classical musicians and went on to spend thirty-six years in Bordeaux leading the city's most popular orchestras. How did this African American, raised in the biggest slave market in the United States, come to compose ballets for one of the best theaters outside of Paris and gain recognition as one of Bordeaux's most popular orchestra leaders? Beginning with his birth in antebellum New Orleans in 1827 and ending with his death in Paris in 1901, Sally McKee vividly recounts the life of this extraordinary man. From the Crescent City to the City of Light and on to the raucous music halls of Bordeaux, this intimate narrative history brings to life the lost world of exiles and travelers in a rapidly modernizing world that threatened to leave the most vulnerable behind.

  • Rising Sun And Tumbling Bear: Russia's War with Japan

    The definitive history of the Russo-Japanese war

    The Russians were wrong-footed from the start, fighting in Manchuria at the end of a 5,000 mile single track railway; the Japanese were a week or so from their bases. The Russian command structure was hopelessly confused, their generals old and incompetent, the Tsar cautious and uncertain. The Russian naval defeat at Tsushima was as farcical as it was complete. The Japanese had defeated a big European power, and the lessons for the West were there for all to see, had they cared to do so. From this curious war, so unsafely ignored for the most part by the military minds of the day, Richard Connaughton has woven a fascinating narrative to appeal to readers at all levels.

  • American Silver in the Art Institute of Chicago

    The history of American silver offers invaluable insights into the economic and cultural history of the nation itself. Published here for the first time, the Art Institute of Chicago's superb collection embodies innovation and beauty from the colonial era to the present. In the 17th century, silversmiths brought the fashions of their homelands to the colonies, and in the early 18th, new forms arose as technology diversified production. Demand increased in the 19th century as the Industrial Revolution took hold. In the 20th, modernism changed the shape of silver inside and outside the home.

    This beautifully illustrated volume presents highlights from the collection with stunning photography and entries from leading specialists. In-depth essays relate a fascinating story about eating, drinking, and entertaining that spans the history of the Republic and trace the development of the Art Institute's holdings of American silver over nearly a century.

  • The Cassell Guide to Common Errors in English

    "Fewer" or "less"; "different from" or "different to"; "to boldly go" or "to go boldly". The English language is a minefield of common errors and disputed points, but this book intends to be a hand to help. Dealing with wide-ranging problems of grammar, syntax, punctuation, spelling, usage and style, all articles have examples of incorrect usage, drawn from contemporary newspapers, magazines, books, television and radio. These help pinpoint the errors common in written or spoken English, and the correct examples indicate how best to avoid these pitfalls in one's own use of the English language.

  • Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation/Volume 7, Parts A and B

    It has been shown both experimentally {2} and theoretically {2,3} that surface skimming SH waves propagating along symmetry axes of the texture have velocities that differ in proportion to the magnitude of any stress that lies along one of the symmetry axes. Specifically, the stress is directly proportional to the relative velocity difference through the equation -, --V ik=---V. -=ki) ( I) cr. = 2G (-V ik where cr. is the stress in the direction i, G is the shear modulus and Vik is the elocity of an SH wave propagating in the i direction and polarized in the k direction. This rather simple relationship is particularly useful because the constant of proportionality involves only the well known shear modulus and the velocity term can be measured directly by observing the transit time shift when a transmitter-receiver pair of SH wave transducers are rotated through 90 degrees on the surface of the part. Experimentally, Equation (I) was tested on the web of railroad rails which had been loaded by a 200,000 pound mechanical testing machine {I}. The method of exciting and detecting the necessary surface skimming SH waves used electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) that operated through a magnetostrictive mechanism at high magnetic fields {4}. Wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the rail on the web differed by the amount predicted by Equation (I) to an absolute accuracy of 30 percent in the worst case.

  • Frank Lloyd Wright and San Francisco

    An unprecedented look at the architect's storied relationship with San Francisco and the Bay Area

    Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) often spent time in San Francisco, which he called "the most charming city in America." Paul V. Turner looks at the architect's complex and evolving relationship with the city, surveying the full body of Wright's work in the Bay Area--roughly thirty projects, a third of which were built. Spanning 1900 to 1959, they include houses, a gift shop, a civic center, a skyscraper, a church, an industrial building, a mortuary, and a bridge across the San Francisco Bay. The unbuilt structures are among Wright's most innovative, and the diverse reasons for their failure counter long-held stereotypes about the architect.

    Wright's Bay Area projects are published together here for the first time, along with previously unpublished correspondence between Wright and his clients, as well as his Bay Area associate Aaron Green. Stories from San Francisco newspapers portray the media's changing positions on Wright--from his early personal scandals to his later roles as eccentric provocateur and celebrated creative genius. Beautifully illustrated with the architect's original drawings and plans, Frank Lloyd Wright and San Francisco highlights aspects of the architect's career that have never before been explored, inspiring a new understanding of Wright, his personal and client interactions, and his work.

  • Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio's Studio: Early Paintings and New Attributions

    Presents exciting, original conclusions about Leonardo da Vinci's early life as an artist and amplifies his role in Andrea del Verrocchio's studio

    This groundbreaking reexamination of the beginnings of Leonardo da Vinci's (1452-1519) life as an artist suggests new candidates for his earliest surviving work and revises our understanding of his role in the studio of his teacher, Andrea del Verrocchio (1435-1488). Anchoring this analysis are important yet often overlooked considerations about Verrocchio's studio--specifically, the collaborative nature of most works that emerged from it and the probability that Leonardo must initially have learned to paint in tempera, as his teacher did. The book searches for the young artist's hand among the tempera works from Verrocchio's studio and proposes new criteria for judging Verrocchio's own painting style. Several paintings are identified here as likely the work of Leonardo, and others long considered works by Verrocchio or his assistant Lorenzo di Credi (1457/59-1536) may now be seen as collaborations with Leonardo sometime before his departure from Florence in 1482/83. In addition to Laurence Kanter's detailed arguments, the book features three essays presenting recent scientific analysis and imaging that support the new attributions of paintings, or parts of paintings, to Leonardo.

  • The Hunt: The Outcome Is Never Certain

    An unprecedented, close-up view of predators and their prey in life-or-death conflict, from the grasslands of East Africa to the icy Arctic

    Nothing in nature is more dramatic than the exertion of a hunter in pursuit and the maneuvers of its intended prey. This breathtaking volume, spectacularly illustrated with over 250 of the most gripping and colorful nature images ever taken, reveals the dynamic relationship between predator and prey. Alastair Fothergill, Huw Cordey, and their unmatched photography team have explored the world filming killer whales, harpy eagles, Darwin's bark spiders in Madagascar, Arctic wolves, polar bears, octopuses, and dozens of other species--all engaged in potentially lethal contests between hungry pursuer and desperate quarry.

    The Hunt, developed and written during the filming of the television series--which the Wall Street Journal called "[E]xtraordinary"--dispels the myth of predator as ruthless killer. The wealth of new information uncovered during the creation of the project shows that predators are the hardest-working animals in nature, failing more often than succeeding in their attempts to capture dinner. This book focuses on the amazing diversity of predator strategies and the equally various escape techniques of their prey, highlighting the life-and-death moments when the skills of hunter and hunted are stretched to the extreme and the outcome is never certain.

  • Masterpieces of Defence

    Defence: the mere sound of the word can cause bridge players to step back a pace. Yet the fact remains that you will defend roughly twice as many hands as you declare. A truly solid grasp of what it takes to break a contract is thus a key element of winning on a regular basis.

    Happily Julian Pottage unravel some of the mysteries surrounding defensive play. He shows how players at all levels can exploit their talents by following a few simple pieces of advice.

  • Lawrence of Arabia's War : The Arabs, the British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WWI

    A wealth of new research supports this groundbreaking account of the Arab Revolt and the Palestine Campaign during WWI. The author provides insights into Lawrence's peculiar genius, the collision of tradition with modernity, and the beginnings of the insurgencies that today inflame the Middle East.

  • Soft Furnishings: The Pleasures of Home

    Use fabric with confidence and flair! Take a look around your room, determine its style, and then begin a process of marvelous transformation. Each project here features an entire room, so you can see how to add a variety of soft details designed specifically for its specific form and function--and how to create a coherent and harmonious effect. The full range of soft furnishings is covered: curtains, pelmets, blinds, loose covers, cushions, and table and bed linen. Take the expert advice on choosing appropriate colors, patterns, and end patterns for the style you prefer. Among the interiors featured here--Cottage Bedrooms and Provencal Kitchens. And beautiful cased sheer curtains add a fresh, airy look to any room. Whatever decor you prefer, you'll find a unique blend of inspiration and practical advice. 128 pages (all in color), 9 3/4 x 9 3/4.

  • Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905-2016

    A fascinating survey of pioneering work in experimental cinema and art from 1905 to the present day, revealing the high stakes and transformative potential of these forms

    This generously illustrated publication surveys the work of filmmakers and artists who have pushed the material and conceptual boundaries of cinema. Over the past century, the material, optical, abstract, spatial, and tactile properties of film have been tested at a level of experimentation and utopian ambition that is generally unrecognized. Whether creating synesthetic or 3-D environments, projective or non-projective installations, generations of leading-edge artists have explored how technology transforms experience.

    The essays published here offer an intensive look at the themes of cinematic space, formats of the screen, animation and CGI, the body and the cyborg, and the materiality of film. Contributors place particular emphasis on the idea of the cinema as a sensorium and on the ways in which it defines the human body, both through representation and in relation to the projected image. An immersive plate section brings together rarely seen and previously unpublished stills, in addition to concept drawings from historic and contemporary films.

  • Finitely Additive Measures and Relaxations of Extremal Problems

    This monograph constructs correct extensions of extremal problems, including problems of multicriteria optimization as well as more general cone optimization problems. The author obtains common conditions of stability and asymptotic nonsensitivity of extremal problems under perturbation of a part of integral restrictions for finite and infinite systems of restrictions. Features include individual chapters on nonstandard approximation of finitely additive measures by indefinite integrals and constructions of attraction sets. Professor Chentsov illustrates abstract settings by providing examples of problems of impulse control, mathematical programming, and stochastic optimization.

  • Art Can Help

    A collection of inspiring essays by the photographer Robert Adams, who advocates the meaningfulness of art in a disillusioned society

    In Art Can Help, the internationally acclaimed American photographer Robert Adams offers over two dozen meditations on the purpose of art and the responsibility of the artist. In particular, Adams advocates art that evokes beauty without irony or sentimentality, art that "encourages us to gratitude and engagement, and is of both personal and civic consequence." Following an introduction, the book begins with two short essays on the works of the American painter Edward Hopper, an artist venerated by Adams. The rest of this compilation contains texts--more than half of which have never before been published--that contemplate one or two works by an individual artist. The pictures discussed are by noted photographers such as Julia Margaret Cameron, Emmet Gowin, Dorothea Lange, Abelardo Morell, Edward Ranney, Judith Joy Ross, John Szarkowski, and Garry Winogrand. Several essays summon the words of literary figures, including Virginia Woolf and Czeslaw Milosz. Adams's voice is at once intimate and accessible, and is imbued with the accumulated wisdom of a long career devoted to making and viewing art. This eloquent and moving book champions art that fights against disillusionment and despair.

  • Materialism

    A brilliant introduction to the philosophical concept of materialism and its relevance to contemporary science and culture

    In this eye-opening, intellectually stimulating appreciation of a fascinating school of philosophy, Terry Eagleton makes a powerful argument that materialism is at the center of today's important scientific and cultural as well as philosophical debates. The author reveals entirely fresh ways of considering the values and beliefs of three very different materialists--Marx, Nietzsche, and Wittgenstein--drawing striking comparisons between their philosophies while reflecting on a wide array of topics, from ideology and history to language, ethics, and the aesthetic. Cogently demonstrating how it is our bodies and corporeal activity that make thought and consciousness possible, Eagleton's book is a valuable exposition on philosophic thought that strikes to the heart of how we think about ourselves and live in the world.

  • Methods in Computational Chemistry: Electron Correlation in Atoms and Molecules

    When, forty years ago, as a student of Charles Coulson in Oxford I began work in theoretical chemistry, I was provided with a Brunsviga calculator-a small mechanical device with a handle for propulsion, metal levers for setting the numbers, and a bell that rang to indicate overflow. What has since come to be known as computational chemistry was just beginning. There followed a long period in which the fundamental theory of the "golden age" (1925-1935) was extended and refined and in which the dreams of the early practitioners were gradually turned into hard arithmetic reality. As a still-computing survivor from the early postwar days now enjoying the benefits of unbelievably improved hardware, I am glad to contribute a foreword to this series and to have the opportunity of providing a little historical perspective. After the Brunsviga came the electromechanical machines of the late 1940s and early 1950s, and a great reduction in the burden of calculating molecular wavefunctions. We were now happy. At least for systems con- taining a few electrons it was possible to make fully ab initio calculations, even though semiempirical models remained indispensable for most molecules of everyday interest. The 1950 papers of Hall and of Roothaan represented an important milestone along the road to larger-scale non- empirical calculations, extending the prewar work of Hartree and Fock from many-electron atoms to many-electron molecules-and thus into "real chemistry.

  • Franchising in Europe

    With 1992 in mind, this book looks at how business can expand through franchising operations in Europe. Key information is contained within each chapter, concerning both general conditions and specific considerations in relation to a particular European country. Each of the 12 EC member states is profiled by a specialist in that particular country. Coverage includes statutory requirements, legal issues relating to competition, employment and copyright, tax and financial matters. Appendices supply the text of key EC legislature and the European Franchise Federation Code of Ethics. As an area with a high potential for profit, franchising is growing relatively fast, both from the point of view of franchisers (those selling franchises) and franchisees (those buying them). The book aims to provide a guide to those who are considering entry into this market.

  • Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire

    Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire are among the least-explored counties in Scotland, but no other area can lay claim to their astounding diversity of character, from the wild remote moorland of the south to the landscape of the Clyde estuary in the north-west, and from deeply rural villages to former steel and iron towns of the Lanarkshire coalfields. Renfrewshire boasts not only the medieval abbey at the centre of Paisley, but also the great port of Greenock, with one of the grandest municipal palaces of Victorian Scotland, and in the countryside Georgian houses and well-to-do Edwardian villas, including Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Windyhill. In Lanarkshire are the great medieval castles of Bothwell and Craignethan, William Adam's majestic hunting lodge at Chatelherault, and planned settlements of international significance, from the model weaving village of Robert Owen's New Lanark to the post-war New Town of Cumbernauld.

  • Parallel Processing Techniques for Simulation

    This volume provides the proceedings of the First European Workshop on Parallel Processing Techniques for Simulation which was held at the end of October 1985. The Workshop was organized within the framework of a joint project sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities under the research part of the multiannua1 programme in the field of Data Processing aming at promoting collaborative research work in the Community. The project involved collaborative work between the Complex Systems Group of the Control Systems Centre at UMIST, the Systems Reliability Service of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and the University of Bergamo, Italy. The aim of this project was to develop decomposition coordination techniques which would be of help in the simulation of complex dynamical systems on parallel processing facilities. One of the major aims of the Workshop was to report on the results produced within the project and to try to relate these to the leading work going on in this field in other centres of excellence. With this in mind, the Proceedings Volume is split up into a number of parts corresponding to the main sessions within the Workshop programme.

  • Elementary Physicochemical Processes on Solid Surfaces

    vi industrial process or a class of catalysts forms the basis of other books, with information on: fundamental science of the topic, the use of the pro- cess or catalysts, and engineering aspects. Single topics in catalysis are also treated in the series, with books giving the theory of the underlying science, and relating it to catalytic practice. We believe that this approach is giving a collection of volumes that is of value to both academic and industrial workers. The series editors welcome comments on the series and suggestions of topics for future volumes. Martyn Twigg Michael Spencer Billingham and Cardiff Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 1 . . . . . . . . Chapter 1. Vibrational Relaxation of Adsorbed Particles . . . .. . 5 1.1. General Approach to Describing Vibrational Relaxation ..... 5 1.2. Phonon Mechanism of Relaxation .................... 8 1.2.1. Relationship between the Simple Perturbation Theory and the Adiabatic Approximation .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . 9 . 1.2.2. One-Mode Approximation .................. . .. 11 1.2.3. Relaxation Caused by Correlation Potential Proportional to Displacement of Adsorbed Particle from Equilibrium ........................... 12 1.2.4. Relaxation Caused by Correlation Potential Proportional to Displacement of Surface Atom from Equilibrium ........................... 14 1.2.5. Results and Discussion ....................... 15 1.3. Vibrational Relaxation via Interaction with Conduction Electrons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 18 . . . . . . . . . 1.3.1. Dipole Approximation ......... '.' . . . . . . . . .. . . 18 .

  • Subversion and Surrealism in the Art of Honoré Sharrer

    Honore Sharrer (1920-2009) was a major art world figure in 1940s America, celebrated for exquisitely detailed paintings conveying subtly subversive critiques of the political and artistic climate of her time. This book offers the first critical reassessment of the artist: a leftist, female painter committed to figuration in an era when anti-Communist sentiment and masculine Abstract Expressionism dominated American culture. Her brightly colored, humorous, and distinctly feminine paintings combine elements of social realism and surrealism to seductive and disquieting effect. This publication is a timely reevaluation of an artist who pushed the boundaries of figurative painting with playfulness and biting wit.

  • Ahlan Wa Sahlan: Functional Modern Standard Arabic for Beginners

    The second edition of this widely used text covers the first year of instruction in Modern Standard Arabic. It will teach students to read, speak, and write Arabic, while presenting an engaging story that involves Adnan, a Syrian student studying in the United States, and Michael, an American student studying in Cairo. In diaries, letters, and postcards, the two students describe their thoughts and activities, revealing how a non-American views American culture and how the Arabic culture is experienced by an American student. This edition features online video, filmed in Syria; expanded communicative activities; an updated audio program; and material designed according to proficiency principles.

    Features of this Edition include:

    • video, filmed in Syria
    • expanded communicative activities
    • updated audio program
    • material designed according to proficiency principles

    Components of the Second Edition include:

    • A full-color Student Textbook with included online audio and video access
    • Annotated Instructor's Edition (ISBN 978-0-300-14047-7)
    • Sound and Script Workbook
    • Online, interactive exercises

  • Losing Small Wars: British Military Failure in the 9/11 Wars

    This new edition of Frank Ledwidge's eye-opening analysis of British involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan unpicks the causes and enormous costs of military failure. Updated throughout, and with fresh chapters assessing and enumerating the overall military performance since 2011--including Libya, ISIS, and the Chilcot findings--Ledwidge shows how lessons continue to go unlearned.

    "A brave and important book; essential reading for anyone wanting insights into the dysfunction within the British military today, and the consequences this has on the lives of innocent civilians caught up in war."--Times Literary Supplement

  • The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists

    Featuring the work of artists such as Fidelia Bridges and William Trost Richards, this stunning volume explores the history and historiography of the American Pre-Raphaelite movement.

  • Empress and Handmaid: Nature and Gender in the Cult of the Virgin Mary

    Medieval images of the Virgin Mary for veneration usually showed a mother and child enthroned, bearing signs of regal authority. Yet modern images show her standing alone, without signs of authority or maternity. This work argues that this and other developments in the cult of the Virgin in western Christianity must be understood against the background of our changing relationship with 'nature'. The book offers a new assessment of the significance of the cult of the Virgin in Christianity. It also includes an original account of the development of the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception. The theorectical perspective is strongly influenced by the Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School, in its critique of domination.

  • Apparitions - Frottages and Rubbings from 1860 to Now

    This fascinating publication sheds light on a medium that combines the qualities of drawing with those of sculpture, printmaking, and painting, and is the first to focus exclusively on the art technique known as frottage, derived from the French word frotter, meaning "to rub." Over 100 pieces, ranging from contemporary conceptual works to rubbings recording tombs and inscriptions, are assembled and sumptuously reproduced in color. More than 50 artists--including the famous, like Max Ernst, inventor of the term "frottage," and the relatively unknown--are presented. Four thematic sections explore different aspects of frottage: its roots in Surrealism and the practice of automatic drawing; the notion of trace, of either a place or an idea left behind in a rubbing; the "apparitions" or ghostlike attributes that can appear on the surface of an artwork; and the associations between rubbings, death, and memory.

  • On Faith and Science

    A captivating historical survey of the key debates, questions, and controversies at the intersection of science and religion

    Throughout history, scientific discovery has clashed with religious dogma, creating conflict, controversy, and sometimes violent dispute. In this enlightening and accessible volume, distinguished historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edward Larson and Michael Ruse, philosopher of science and Gifford Lecturer, offer their distinctive viewpoints on the sometimes contentious relationship between science and religion. The authors explore how scientists, philosophers, and theologians through time and today approach vitally important topics, including cosmology, geology, evolution, genetics, neurobiology, gender, and the environment. Broaching their subjects from both historical and philosophical perspectives, Larson and Ruse avoid rancor and polemic as they address many of the core issues currently under debate by the adherents of science and the advocates of faith, shedding light on the richly diverse field of ideas at the crossroads where science meets spiritual belief.

  • Plutocrats United: Campaign Money, the Supreme Court, and the Distortion of American Elections

    From a leading expert on election law, a compelling answer to the dilemmas of campaign finance reform

    Campaign financing is one of today's most divisive political issues. The left asserts that the electoral process is rife with corruption. The right protests that the real aim of campaign limits is to suppress political activity and protect incumbents. Meanwhile, money flows freely on both sides. In Plutocrats United, Richard Hasen argues that both left and right avoid the key issue of the new Citizens United era: balancing political inequality with free speech.

    The Supreme Court has long held that corruption and its appearance are the only reasons to constitutionally restrict campaign funds. Progressives often agree but have a much broader view of corruption. Hasen argues for a new focus and way forward: if the government is to ensure robust political debate, the Supreme Court should allow limits on money in politics to prevent those with great economic power from distorting the political process.

  • Theo Van Doesburg: A New Expression of Life, Art, and Technology

    This handsome catalogue presents the Dutch artist Theo Van Doesburg (1883-1931) as a nomadic propagandist on a quest for a new aesthetic that, in conjunction with contemporary science and technology, sought to reform the world. Van Doesburg was a central figure of the De Stijl movement, characterized by a pared-down aesthetic centered in basic visual elements such as geometric shapes and primary colors, and this book highlights the artist's collaborations with other leading members, including Piet Mondrian, Bart van der Leck, and Georges Vantongerloo. It also traces the stylistic trajectory of the artist's career from his Neo-Plasticist and Dadaist creations to his Elementarist and Conrete artworks and brings together art, architecture, cinema, poetry, literature, design, and typography to illuminate Van Doesburg's enduring contributions to De Stijl.

  • Guide to Better Card Play

    The world's oldest, and leading, bridge magazine, The Bridge World, said of this book:

    'Guide to Better Card Play is an elementary-through-intermediate textbook on declarer play and defence. Appropriately, the two phases of the book receive equal attention. The book can be used either as a self-teacher or as the basis of a series of lessons. In addition to the tutorial material, which is comprehensive, careful and instructive, the work is choc-a-bloc with summaries, reviews, quizzes and example deals. There is even an appendix that allows your foursome to set up the practice deals yourself. We like almost everything about this book, we especially liked the attention to partnership methods, the topic selection, and the carefully constructed lesson deals. There are other good texts at this level, but Klinger's book has twice as much material as similar works. This is a very good buy.'

  • The Hundred Years War - A People`s History

    What life was like for ordinary French and English people, embroiled in a devastating century-long conflict that changed their world

    The Hundred Years War (1337-1453) dominated life in England and France for well over a century. It became the defining feature of existence for generations. This sweeping book is the first to tell the human story of the longest military conflict in history. Historian David Green focuses on the ways the war affected different groups, among them knights, clerics, women, peasants, soldiers, peacemakers, and kings. He also explores how the long war altered governance in England and France and reshaped peoples' perceptions of themselves and of their national character.

    Using the events of the war as a narrative thread, Green illuminates the realities of battle and the conditions of those compelled to live in occupied territory; the roles played by clergy and their shifting loyalties to king and pope; and the influence of the war on developing notions of government, literacy, and education. Peopled with vivid and well-known characters--Henry V, Joan of Arc, Philippe the Good of Burgundy, Edward the Black Prince, John the Blind of Bohemia, and many others--as well as a host of ordinary individuals who were drawn into the struggle, this absorbing book reveals for the first time not only the Hundred Years War's impact on warfare, institutions, and nations, but also its true human cost.

  • Advances in X-Ray Analysis

    The 35th Annual Denver Conference on Applications of X-Ray Analysis was held August 4-8, 1986, on the campus of the University of Denver. Since the previous year's conference had emphasized x-ray diffraction, this year the Plenary Session spotlighted x-ray fluorescence, with the title "Trends in XRF: A World Perspective," featuring renowned speakers from three major areas. XRF IN NORTH AMERICA, by Prof. D. E. Leydon, from Colorado State University, dealt specifically with developments in the fields of instrumentation, data treatment and applications in that part of the world. Prof. H. Ebel, from the Technical University of Vienna, discussed XRF IN EUROPE, concentrating on subjects including total reflection, improved fundamental parameters, quantitation without standards and imaging techniques. Tomoya Arai, of the Rigaku Industrial Corporation in Japan, in considering XRF IN THE FAR EAST, described the scientific activity in XRF and the applications thereof, primarily in Japan and China. These plenary lectures were interspersed with short discussions of PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS on the subject by the co-chairmen of the SeSSion, Ron Jenkins and myself. The intent of this session was to bring the audience up-to-date on the status of the field in various parts of the world, and to give some feeling concerning where it is likely to go in the immediate future. Hopefully, the publication of the written versions of those presentations in this volume will make the authors'